Skip to main content

Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"

See other formats




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 16, 1917. 



No. 1 



M. A. C. STARTS ON SECOND 
HALF CENTURY O F WORK 

At an Epoch Making Time, Pres. 

Butterfield Welcomes Students 

Back at Opening Assembly. 

Starting mi the first lap of the second 
half eeutury of epoch making exist- 
anee, college was officially opened by 
President Butterfield at the first assem- 
bly last Wednesday afternoon, at which 
time old and new students were wel- 
comed in to a new year of progress and 
work at the institution. He gave a 
brief summary of the response the 
faculty, alumni and undergraduates 
had made in answer to the demand for 
agricultural, naval and military service 
last spring, and the creditable manner 
in which the national crisis was recog- 
nized by the men of Old Massachusetts, 
The president, however, emphasized 
the fact that there wait a great need for 
trained leaders especially for the recon- 
struction work that is bound to come in 
reorganising the status of the world's 
society for the purpose of '"making the 
world safe for. and maintaining, democ- 
racy. Leadership in agriculture is 
fully as essential, perhaps more so, than 
more thrilling branches of service. 

In el.»xiiig.all were urged to remain in 
college as far as possible and to co- 
mi. crate with the faculty in making 
these days "sublime to be living in." 



"SCHOLARSHIP" ANNOUNCED 
AS NEW AGGIE WATCHWORD 



UNCLASSIFIED ENROLLMENT 
MAKES LARGE INCREASE 

ITnclasslled students are being admit- 
ted to the college this year with a mini- 
mum age limit of 18, rather than 21 as 
usually— all with an idea to speed up 
our work in preparing leaders. Their 
passing grade baa been lowered to 00 
per cent. All told about 40 students 
have elected unclassified work. They 
have organized themselves as a student 
unit and elected the following officers: 
President, Carol E, Fuller, Portland, 
Mr.; vice-president, D. L. Stockbridge, 
Atlanta, Ga. ; secretary, W. W. Wright, 
Lowell; and treasurer, Howard E, 
Green, Wesllield. 

In addition to this the class comes 
under some Senate rules, among which 
are the following: They must salute 
senate members for the first term of the 
college year. No unclassified student 
shall smoke on the Campus at any lime 
during the first year. Ea<h man is to 
wear a recognition button in the lapel 
of his CO*t, to distinguish him from 
other students. No corduroy trousers 
can lie worn by such students, and no 
profanity shall be used under any prov- 
ocation. Certain exemption claims will 
be recognised, however. 

The students making up this group 
have come from many placet and a re 
taking varied subject*, some planning 
to stay only one year, while others will 
be at \ gg if for two years or even more. 



By President Butterfield at Monday 

Chapel. Significance of the Word. 

Past Aggie Mottoes. 

Following a custom inaugurated eight 
years ago, "Scholarship" was given as 
the watchword for the coming collegiate 
year by President Butterfield at the 
noon chapel services Monday. In pre- 
senting this sentiment or motto, em- 
bodying as it does a most aggressive 
principle, he said in part, "Real scholar- 
ship will do more for the college than 
anything else or any combination of 
things could. The scholar of today is 
perhaps a collector of facts, but they are 
important, and what is even greater 
they are red-blooded. The just "get- 
tlng-by" idea is responsible for a good 
deal of the present-day collegiate in- 
eHicieney. The man who makes marks 
in college will make bis mark in the 
world." 

"What has the faculty the right to 
expect from the students? First, stud- 
ies should be put first, for the college is 
built around studies, second, a student 

marks and scholastic endeavor should 
become as popular as that in athletic 
and other branches of extra-curriculum 
activities; third, thoughts should be 
guided in order to get fundamental 
principles; and fourth, strive for Intel- 
lectual leadership and become curious 
for the knowledge of ibe big things of 
life or in a word, aim for Intellectual 
efficiency." 

Some of the put watchwords are 
"Boost old Aggie!" in 1914, "Friend II- 
ness" in 1916 and "Leadership" in 1916. 



ENROLLMENT OF ENTERING 
CLASS DROPS TO LOW MARK 



Blessington, James B. 



REGISTRATION FIGURES 

Total Enrollment Shows Effects of 
the War, 

War baa placed its grim hand upon 
the M A. C. ••anion* and shown its 
effects perhaps greatest in the depleted 
class ranks, all of which have been 
more or less thinned out with a total 
undergraduate registration of hki stu- 
dents. This is 190 less than last year 
when there were 672 four year men and 
208 less than 11)1 A when .".!»! men were 
aspirants for the elusive sheepskin. 

However the new rules for the admit- 
tance of unclassified students, this 
year numbering 40, has raised so mew hat 
the total number. 

Comparative figures: 



Seniors, 

Juniors, 

Sophomores, 

Freshmen, 

Unclassified, 


MB. 
10M 
lit) 
Mi 
•ill 
26 


i -. • i • - . 

104 
13* 
172 
150 

n 


09 

1H7 
111 

KKl 

M 


Totals, 


fllfl 


00H 


4M 


Graduate students. 






19 


Vocational poultry 






4 


Special, 






2 



Total, 



22 



Only 107 Freshmen on Campus at 

Opening of College, Seven Co-eds. 

Fewer Out-of-State Men. 

Nineteen hundred and twenty-one, 
107 strong, has made its debut on the 
campus. Comparing this enrollment 
with 153 last fall, which itself was a de- 
crease of 25 per cent, from the previous 
year shows the effects of the war 
strongly. Only eight of the freshmen 
come from out of state places. The 
class is honored by the preseuce of 
seven young ladies. Following is the, 
1921 enrollment : 

Alger, James W. Beading 

Allen, Ralph 0. Longmeadow 

Allen, Vaughn Arlington 

Ames. Nathaniel J. Peabody 

Anderson, Charles II Medford 

Baker, Louis It. Salum 

Baker, Russell I). Marshfleld 

Barnes, Franklin A. Lyno 

Bartlett, John Westboro 

liennett, James S. Meriden, Conn, 

lilackwell, lienriette Boston 

Lynn 
' i >■ .< nam 

liowen, Wtllard Natick 

Brigham, John D. .Sutton 

Brown, Charles 11 Wintbrop 

Brown, Paul B. liroekton 

Brown, Paul W, Fiskdale 

Buck, Horace North hast on 

Cameron, Viola New Salem 

Carroll.Walter H. Boston 

Chaqnarian, George Georgetown 

Cook, Donald ii. Iladley 

Coombs, Roger C. Peabody 

Cooper, Lawrence M. Charlem.mt 

Culver, Roger Williamsburg 

Curtis, Harojd M Stougbton 

Day, Roland W. Medfield 

Dean, Herman N. Oakham 

Dinge, J. Frank Canton 

Kdman, George \V. Orange 

Evers, Joseph D, Maiden 

Fenton, James F. Amherst 

Fisher, Lesnder W. Lynn 

Fletcher, Francis S Lynn 

Fogg, Lloyd C, Topstleld 

French, Carroll B, Lynn 

Galusha, Mark U. Wllliamstown 

Geer, Herbert L. Three Rivers 

Goodstone, Sarah W. Springfield 

Gould, Robert M Shell. urne 

Hawley, Robert K. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hayes, Elmer Somervllbj 

Hemenway, Rachel T. Williamsburg 

Hodgson, Robert M. Newport, R. I. 

Howard, Wintbrop W. South Fas ton 

Jackson, lidding F. Beicbertown 

Jones, Edward C. Wrtntbam 

Kendall, Charles I > Worcester 

Kirk land , Lyle Chester 

Kokoski, Frank J. Had ley 

LabrovitK, Edward Amherst 

Lacroiz, Donald Bow ley 

Leavltt, Ralph Melrose 

Lewandowski, John Kasthampton 

Lock wood, George B. Hyde Park 

(Continued on pegs •.] 



MASS MEETING SATURDAY 
RIVALS OLD TIME RALLIES 

Despite Unusual Conditions at Col- 
lege. Seniors Stage Panto- 
mime. List of Speakers. 

Football prospects were all that kept 
the mass meeting of Saturday night 
from having the pep of former years. 
Qood live speeches, lots of cheering ami 
a pantomime mi the war staged by the 
remnants of the senior class showed 
thai the old Aggie spirit still pervades 
i he campus. "Tom" Carter as "Kaiser 
Bill," "Shorty" Schlough as all-boat, 
"Ted" Ken in ;m i n as the Americau far- 
mer, Steve Richardson, the good ship 
Lusitania, "Og" Pratt realistically tak- 
ing the part of famine, and Clark in the 
role of peace made up the cast of the 
pantomime. A nice fat duck mysteri- 
ously captured from "somewhere on 
the farm" made an ideal dove of peace. 
The affair showed the downfall of Kal- 
serism and the arrival of peace. All 
classes sang original songs as they filed 
into their respective sections. The 
speakers of the evening were Dickinson 

Batchelder '10 and Smith *20, "Sam- 
my" Sampson '1H, second lieutenant al 
Ayer, blew onto the campus during 
the program and ex tempore (old nf 
some of bis experiences as a man ■>! 
war. 

One of the most impressive parts of 
the program of the evening was tin 
taking of the pledge by the freshman 
class, admitting them formally into \l 
A. C, Standing, with bands raised, 
they took the following oath, adminis- 
tered by Russell, president of the 
senate; 

"I will, and as a class we will, be 
loyal to the traditions of the college, 
loyal to its ideals and purposes, loyal 
to oar country, to oar state and to the 
fellowship into which you now receive 
u»." 

President Butterfield then welcomed 
the newly initiated class into the fellow- 
ship of Aggie men. 



SOPHS WIN ROPE PULL 

Nineteen hundred and twenty put tin- 
finishing touches on a week of victories 
when they pulled Ihn freshmen through 
the pond Saturday afternoon in the 
annual sophomore-freshman rope poll. 
1911 resisted stubbornly during the first 
few minutes, but the soph, nores got 
the jnmp with the gun a„,\ held this 
advantage, pulling the first year men 
faster and faster, until at the final gnu 
Blanchard, 1OTQ anchor man, was am** 
the ravine and behind Flint Lab. ami 
the last freshman was across the pond 
and well up the other bank. It was 
conceded to be one of the worst defeats, 
as well as one of the easiest victories, 
in the history of the contest. 

*1J.— Higgini Is in France. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917. 



:::: 



AGGIE HONOR ROLL 



List of Men in Service for Country 
and the College 
No oue can honestly Bay that Aggie 
mt ii are not doing their little hit in 
the great world struggle. Prac- 
tically 12"> of the undergraduate 
body of the past two years are al- 
ready in the service of the nation or 
uwaitiug to be called. They may he 
found in every branch of the service. 
Hollowing is a list of some of the men 
ami the branch they are connected 
with. This is only a starter. Morewill 
follow in each issue. 

Aggie Ken in U. 8. Service 
lUlti 
I). F. Banes, Aviation Corps 
John Cardarelli, 1st Lt. (). K. O. 
('. II. Fernald, enlisted Naval Reserve 
B. A. Gilmore, drafted 
r. B. Hathaway, 2nd Lt. l'rov. Reg. 

A nny 
f, B. Haskell, 2nd Lt. l'rov. Ueg. Anny 
.1. S. Hemmenway, 2nd Lt. Prov. Ueg. 

Army 
Herbert H. Walkden, drafted 
Henry M. Walker, National Army 

P, ii. Uabcock, 1st Lt. Aviation Corps 
K. S. Boles, Navy 
F. H. Hay, 2nd Lt. Prov. Army 
1>. S. DiiiHinore. 2nd Lt. <>. H. C. 
(. < . Everbeck, 2nd Lt. O, H. C. 
Frank Kd wards, Capt. O. B. 0. 
"Bud" Fisher, National Army 
\v. u. brrlnf, tad Lt. <>. R. C. 

C (iurshin, Naval Reserve 

M. K. Lawrence, Naval Reserve 

W. A. Mask, tad Lt. Prov. Reg. Army 

II. B. Nash, National Army 

H. B. Pierce, 2nd Lt. Prov. Reg. Army 

L K. Richardson, National Army 



B. Woodworth. enlisted 
George Howe ex-' 18, drafted 
Chester W. Birch ex-'18, National Army 
Frank Babbit ex-'18, National Army 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917. 



1919 
William Bradley, National Army 
E. P. Cooley, drafted 
J. P. Davies, enlisted 
M. EL Leiper, National Army 
R. F. Munroe, drafted 
E. B. Newton, drafted 
R. E. Peck, Aviation Corps, Texas 
E. F. Sexton, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 
Allan Pond, Engineers Corps, France 
Arthur Quimby, National Army 
E. C. Moor, National Anny 

1920 
Fred V. Waugh, Ambulance Corps, 
France 

BOYS IN SERVICE TELL 

OF THEIR EXPERIENCES 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 

trout.] 

"Al" Spaulding and "Joe" Whitney 
are hard at work doing their little bit. 
Here is a brief word from these two 
prominent 1917 men. 

Ski'T. 27, 1917. 



I would like to inform my friends 
through the News Letter that I am now 
training at Paris Island, S. C, to be a 

marine. 

About three weeks ago Mil Lawrence 
and I left our bean plantation on 
Martha's Vineyard and enlisted, he in 
the Radio school at Newport and I in 
the U. S. Marines. 

"Nails" Randall 17 went through 
this training a short time ago. I gueBS 
he is in France now. There is not an I 



DRAPER LUNCH 






Northampton, Mass. 



Where all foods of the best 

quality are served at the 

minimum price 



•.-.' : 



WM. M. KIMBALL, Proprietor. 






I 



9 



R. W. Swifi, National ttnard 
\V. \V. Thayer, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 
S. F. Tuthill, National Army 
K. L. Upton, 2nd Lt. l'rov. Reg. Army 
F. C Webster, National Army 
A. F. Williams, 2nd Lt. l'rov. Re K . Army 
J. Whitney, Marines 
Elliot Henderson ex-17, 2nd Lt. Prov. 
Reg. Army 

1918 

F .1. Binks, National Army 
W. F. Boa/,, 1st Lt. O. R. 0, 
Roger Chambers, National Army 
I). B. Farrar, Aviation Corps 
L. ,!. Fanuef, Aviation Corps 
H.C Fellows, National Army 
D. 8. Franois, 2nd Lt. O. R, C. 
• A. Fraaer, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 
T. J. Gasser, drafted 
O. L. Goodridge, 2nd Lt. O. R, C. 
F. G. Gordon, National Guard 
M. B. Gray, Navy 
Forreat Grayson, drafted 
( . H. Higelsteln, 2nd Li. O. 

Engineers 
R. W. Harwood, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 
R. P. Holmes, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 

F. I, Uance, 2nd Lt. National Guard ol 

N.J. 
L. C. Higgins, Ambulance Corps, France 
M. Marshall, 2nd Lt. Q. M. Corps 
W. H. McNaught,2ud Lt. Field Artillery 
%, S'. Mitchell, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 

G. Norcross, National Army 
L. N. OdanJi, 1st Lt. O. R, C. 
J, C. Powell, 2nd Lt. O. R. 0. 
F. B. Sampson, tad Lt. O. B. C 

lill, Gkla. 
L. W. Spaulding, at FUttahurg 
P. R. Squires, 2nd Lt. O. R. C. 
W. N. Thompson, drafted 
Boger Weeks, Capt. O. R. C. 



Barracks Co. S8, Paris Island, S. C, will 

reach me. 

Yours in Old Aggie, 

"Jok" Whitskv '17. 
j. s._if the musical organization 
continues this coming college year I 
wish it all the success possible. 

J. W. 



THE 



Skit. 1, 1917. 



R. C. 



Fort 



I want to thank you, "Buaa." and the 
Dean for that second edition of the 
M. 4.0. News. It was a corker and 
hit me right in a soft spot at a very op- 
portune time. Received it "over here." 
They say that "Somewhere in France" 
ha* long been a dead phrase. They're 
right! Still, if you can make it any 
more definite and gel away with it 
you're an artist. 

1 sincerely hope they don't cut out 
too much and substitute too mucn next 
year at the old college. I mean I hope 
it doesn't get fashionable for eondi to 
take knitting to classes. 

Seriously, Professor, I never realized 
what a real hell this cursed conflict was 
(or is) until I struck France. I don't 
mean It looks like a morgue, but lt doe* 
look mighty funereal, 

111 give my official address before I 
g#t any further; Corp. A. W. Spauld- 
ing, Section 39 U. S. A. Ambulance 
Service, American Kaped. Foreea, *ia 
New York, Francs, 

Hope you have a big gang back there 
next fall. I don't believe this riot is 
going to continue much longer. Re- 
gards to Buai and the college. 
Sincerely, 
AI.M0S W. Spaui,d»», 



The unsurpassed eating house for -Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 

Twas the twa#qnarter» tor ,71 

Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



E, M. BUFTIM, *>» 



R. B. COLLINS. *1« 
r. K COLK. "20 




Un 



M. A. C. 

Basement «f North Dormitory 

,tes ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



Q ™^,r n mmr KTlP— We carry a full line of note books, paper, stationery, 
door. Obey that impulse and pay us a visit. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown fcy the Fterleulturtl D***. 

We offer our surplus stock of cat flow- 
era and plants at reasonable rates to 
students and faculty. This stock is 
grown in modern houses under ideal 
conditions. Rones, carnations, violets, 
chrysanthemums and sweet peas In 
season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone 800 



The "Nanotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 

Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hole Dinner. $1,25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr, 



COLLEGE STAFF SHOWS 

EFFECTS OF THE WAR 

Although many changes have taken 
place in the Faculty, some resigning 
and some going on leave of absence, 
enough of the instructors have beeu re- 
tained, and enough new men added to 
the staff, so that the teaching force has 
not been crippled for good work. The 
vacancies made by faculty members on 
leave of absence will be waiting for 
them when they see their way clear to 
return to Aggie. 

Burt A. liazeltine, instructor in Math- 
ematics, is now instructing men in 
math at the aviation school at Newport. 
F. N. Pagan, assistant horticulturist 
of Penn State came to Aggie this fall to 
do graduate work, and in addition has 
taken charge of a course in systematic 
pomology. 

Dr. Ernest Anderson has been given a 
leave of absence and accepted a position 
as professor of Agricultural Chemistry 
in the College of Agriculture at the 
University of South Africa, Pretoria, 
Transvaal. Ue sailed from New York 
directly to Cape Town the latter part of 
July. "The City of Athens," on which 
he sailed, was blown up by a mine, 
probably left by a German raider, just 
outside Cape Town. l)r Anderson 
with his wife and two children, was 
saved but they lost all their personal 
belongings. Up to the present time no 
more definite word has been received. 

Captain Fleet, who completed his pre- 
scribed two years as Commandant at 
Aggie last spring, is now at Plattshurg. 
Sergeant Smart has been made a 
captain and is with the supply com- 
pany of the 301st regiment. 

The new Commandant is Col. Richard 
U. Wilson, U. S. A. retired, and under 
his training the companies, freshmen 
and sophomores, with appereliaamnfl 
who have elected the It. 0. T. C. as 
utticers, will soon be in tine shape. 

Erwin II . Forbusb, formerly the Su- 
pervisor of Correspondence Courses at 
Aggie, is now with the Federal Farm 
I^oan bank in Springfield. 

G. W. Martin, instructor in Botany for 
i be past year, has been with the U. S, 
1). A. at Washington, I). C since the 
early summer. Mr. Rut ledge of the 
Agricultural Economics department, 
and William 1). Ilurd of the Extension 
department are also in Washington. 
I'rofessor llurd is very closely in touch 
with the Hoover committee and in a 
position to render much valuable service. 
Elvin L. Quaife, assistant professor in 
Animal Husbandry, has resigned, and 
is at preaent an extension professor in 
Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. Ever- 
ett H. Rucker, formerly of the Poultry 
department is with him. B, E. Pontius 
haa taken Professor Quaife's place on 
the si .-.it . 



0. T. V. IN NEW HOME 

The Q, T. V. fraternity has moved In- 
to its new home, purchased last year. 
The property was originally the Fearing 
estate, and is situated at the corner al 
Fearing and Pleasant streets. 

This makes seven fraternities running 
houses this year. The local Beta Kappa 
phi, which recently became the na- 
tional Alpha tiainma Rho, was forced 
to rent its home this year, due (o the 
number of its members in war service. 
Several of the chapter have rented 
moms In the house, however. The 
( omraons Club have given up their 
house and obtained rooms in the dorm- 
itories. To date, even wilh this added 
asset to North and South, there are still 
several vacant rooms. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT GETS CALL 

A tire al noon Friday was discovered 
in 8 South College, occupied by II. L. 
Sullivan '18, E. W. Popp '18, and F. S. 
Davenport "20, and before being extin- 
guished did well over $100 worth of 
damage. 

Evidently the lire started from a ciga- 
rette butt, intended to be thrown into 
the fireplace but which fell instead up- 
ou a pile of clothing nearby which was 
being unpacked. Here it must have 
remained unnoticed while the occupants 
of the room left for the noon chapel at 
11-80, Sullivan, returning from the 
services for a sweater, was nearly over- 
come by smoke upon opening the door 
some 20 minutes later. Fresh air from 
the hallway fanned the smouldering 
material into flame, while at the same 
time the window was broken, feeding 
the flames to a greater extent. Quick 
work wilh the extinguishers, however, 
soon had the blaze down, before the 
town motor tire truck, which had been 
called by telephone, and tLe college lire 
department, which responded to the 
ringing of the chapel bell, bad arrived. 

Two boxes of uninsured clothing and 
furnishings were completely destroyed, 
valued at a minimum of *4f», while the 
rooms were damaged to an extent of $30 
to $40, besides considerable aunoyance 
from smoke throughout the middle 
entry. 

CLASS OF 71 CELEBRATES 

FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Although the big celebration of the 
ftOth Anniversary of the college has been 
indeiinitely postponed, until after the 
war at any rate, the campus has again 
been made real and more dear to the 
members of the class of 1871 who held a 
reuuion on the old camping ground last 
Friday and Saturday. Fourteen out of 
seventeen living members of the class 
were present at the round-up. Head- 
quarters for the men, who were in many 
cases accompanied by their wives, was 
at The Davenport, where the class sup- 
per took place Friday evening. 

Friday afternoon a luncheon was given 
the claBS by the trustees. At 3-30 i*. m. 
a public assembly was held at Bowker 
Auditorium in honor of the class, fol- 
lowed by a reception. As the speaker 
of the afternoon President Butterfleld 
introduced William Wheeler '71. who 
was for many years a trustee of the col- 
lege. He gave a very inspiring speech 
on the subject, "At the Half-Century 
Mile Stone."In his closing remarks Pres- 
ident Bulierfield gpoke of one of the 
first Inter-colleglate Boat races between 
Brown, Harvard and Aggie which was 
won by Aggie, lt came off in July, 1871 
and two of the men who were on the 
crew, Mr. Leonard and Mr. Allen, were 
among the '71 men back on the campus. 
The student body sang several songs, 
and the Assembly was concluded by 
singing ''Sons of Old Massachusetts/' 



Johnson Book Go. 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -:- 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of 1 1 ill man and Maraes Htreets. three 
blocks from the Union Depot, Is a modern bog- 
t i'l i -j run on tin* Kuropean Plan. It Is Just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust, 
and ret in the center of the business district. 

Ita rooms are well furnished and comfortable- 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices $1 and up; roomi 
with bath (single) $1.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated din- 
ing room makes a meal a pleasant memory — 
everything of the higheHt quality, well cooked 
and served in the beat poMible manner. 

Htay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel, Springfield. Man. 



Eats, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



Freshman Hats 



GOOD SERVICE 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods. Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



MUSICAL CLUB MEN WANTED 
Considering the fact that there are to 
be no varsity athletics this fall, non- 
athletic activities are going to be the 
big thing on the campus. The musical 
club* will be especially prominent and 
it is hoped by the management that a 
large number of candidates will respond 
to this call. 

There will be a short meeting Wednes- 
day night, Oct. 17, at 7 o'clock, in the 
Old Chapel, at which time the policies 
to be followed this year will be outlined. 
Everyone who is eligible from the four 
classes should be present at that meet- 
ing. Remember last year's motto of the 
clubs— "Let's Go!" 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

FOR forty yean we have rendered faithful service. For forty 
yean we have tried to make each year's service more nearly 
ideal. This untiring effort hat built for us not only The World'* 
Large* Mail Order Seed Business, but alto a World Wide 
reputation for Efficiency and unditputed leadership. The 
Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual, the 
"Leading American Seed Catalog" is brighter and 
better than ever. It is mailed free. A postcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE k CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Buildings Philadelphia 



Pase's Shoe Store 

Largest Stock — Lowest Prices 
i C he i >«.* ••« Repalrlng-Beait i*iiti»«i- uaed 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DRALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917. 



H 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

PubliBbed eyery Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. LANPHKAR •lS.Edttor-in-Cblaf 
WKSI.KY 8. SAWYER '18 



Athletic Editor 



Associate Editors. 

ART1H It N BOWKN '19 

ELIOT M. Hl'KFUM *19 

AETHCBIL. CHANDLER 'tu 

MYRTON F. BVANB '19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
BIBOKR R. ROBEUl' IBT '18. Buatneaa Mana* «r 
HAM1KL B. FERRIS8 "1U. AuisUnt Manager 
<;VoRUK CAMPBELL *W). Ad*ertl»lr.gM»nager 
.. k M KS C. MAPLEH *20. Circulation 
(J. ALFRED SMITH '20. Ct« -illation 

Subscription 12.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to BIrger R. Rosequlst. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aa aecond-elaM matter at the Amheret 
Poet Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Oct. 16. Ho. 1 



Wkmomk, freshmen, to Old Massa- 
chusetts. It is to be the home of your 
K M«1 rxporience in life. Sever in the 
brilliant history of M. A. C. h«s s** 
entering class enrolled under cor- M 
similar to yours. There 
beefl seniors to lead 
your rampusli f .„ io start 

you eor»» - lii to * RTand 

A „^i , year, however, finds 

,u of the red blooded men 
tlasses i.i the service for their 
.miry. There hasalways been a foot- 
ball team to instill you with college 
spirit, to arouse you to the full meaning 
Mtd appreciation of Aggie songs, cheers 
and tra« tions. This, loo. . amiot be for 
you. Kseti the noting* curriculum is 
aonewbal disorganized. In past years 
;ill of these elements have been sources 
of insp nation to the Incoming class, 
helpinu to mold them into the Aggie 
structure, tint this year finds these in- 
RoeBOM practically nil. So it is up to 
you. titshmen. to consecrate yourselves 
to this new duty of yours. Ofl your own 
initiative, without the usual guidance 
trom the student body and college, you 
must so work out your college life that 
in two or three years you will be fitted 
I,, „(,.,, into the leadership of campus 
life. You must be prepared to be even 
bigger A«gie men than those who have 
gone before, for your responsibilities 
will be greater, Men of initiative, cour- 
age, determination will be needed to 
reorganize campus life and student 
activities after the war. Leaders will 
be in demand out in the world, also in 
the reorganization of the country. And 
all this will fall largely on your 
Bhoulders. Every Aggie alumnus and 
undergraduate Is back o* yoo. Start 
the game right. Remember your pledge, 
-sacrifice »»e of the pleasures you 
expected at college, even as have those 
who have entered the service of the 
country. Be boosters, not loafers. 
Make yourself mm. The college asks 
t h is of you . Do not dlsappoi nt her. 

Never has world history been re- 
corded as in the past four years. Never, 
probably, will Aggie history bt made 
as rapidly as It has since the breaking 
off of diplomatic relations with Ger- 
many, It Is the way of war. No mat- 
ter how disorganized athletics, student 
activities or the college curriculum be- 



come, Aggie men are going to be mak- 
ing a record in this world struggle that 
will be a credit to M. A. C. These facts 
must be recorded. The history of Aggie 
men in war muBt be kept complete. 

Men on the campus: Let us consecrate 
ourselves to thhj task. We owe it to our 
classmates and alumni in the trenches, 
to the college which means so much to 
us, to future generations who will read 
with interest and pride the deeds of 
Aggie men in thiB world struggle. Let 
us resolve that through the medium of 
the Collegian and private letters we 
will get to the very trenches.the training 
camps, to every spot where a M. A. C. 
man is in service, the news of this old 
campus of ours. They will appreciate 
it far more than we realize. It may be 
the one bright light in the new life 
which they have so bravely accepted. 
It will give them opportunity for a few 
brief minutes at least to forget the hor- 
rors of our war and think back to the 
old campus, recall the time when they, 
too, were an active part of the under- 
graduate body. It may be the very in- 
spiration which will spur them on to 
final victory. 

Aggie men In^wrvice: You, too, owe 
that part of the 'student body on the 
campus, likewise your comrades, a simi- 
lar duty. We will see that the Coi.i.E- 
oian gets to you with every bit of 
campus news we can scrape together, 
ask in return that you inform us of 
whereabouts, for we are deeply 
.ucerned. We solicit from each one 
to I of you letters addressed to the student 
body, in which you tell of the experi- 
ences of your new life. These will be 
published word for word in the college 
paper so that we on the campus, those 
in other branches of service, may know 
what you are doing. 

M. A. C. men on the campus and in 
service: Let us all co-operate to bind 
together this big Aggie family of ours. 
One man cannot do it. One group of 
m .n cannot do it. Not even war, how- 
ever, can keep us apart if weall,M.A.< 
irrailuates and undergraduates in every 
branch of life, will it. 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subacription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unles. de- 
layed in the mail.. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will-will not-send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Coi.lkoian, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 

Croysdale Inn 

SOUTH HADLEY. MAftt*. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone MfrWi Holyoke. 



Last Call 



It is with regret that the Coi.i.k«*ian 
Board announces the resignations of 
James C. Powell, business manager, 
Frank J. Binks, managing editor, and 
Ralph W. Uarwood, alumni editor. All 
three are in military service, Powell and 
Harwood as second lieutenants. BIrger 
B, Rosequist has been elected business 
manager. George Campbell, a member 
of the Board two years ago, has been 
elected advertising manager. 



Think— Act 
"Ik 1 don't trust a man I don't give 
him responsibility. U I do trust him 1 
let him alone. I want my men to think 
for themselves. I want them to come to 
me with a decision, not for a decision. 
I expect them to handle their Jobs as 
they see fit knowing that they will have 
to answer to me only for rmlUr' (J. 
Ogden Armour). 

Real business, we will all agree. This 
year Aggie men, in common with thous- 
ands of others, students and faculties 
alike, have thrust upon them more in- 
sistently than ever before the responsi- 
bility of not only thinking, but acting 
as well. Our superior officers, whoever 
they may be, judge not by Intentions, 
but by results. 

Let the axe fall heavy upon the man 
who slips, and realising it, does not try 
his hardest to get back Into the game. 

Back up the freshmen with the results 
of our experience, get them started early 
and right. Back up the college activi- 




Cox Sons & Vining 

72 Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY. CLER6Y AND CHOIR 




Yon know you OUGHT 
You know you WANT 

to BUY A BOND 

The time has romo 
to BUY it 

Second Liberty Loan 
clones o«i. 27 

Liberty Bonds are regular U. S. Government Bond*, bearing 
interest, paid twice yearly. They are the most secure Bonds on 
earth. The Government spends the money here at home, bujr- 
inf arms, uniforms and food forma- soldiers, sailors and airmen, 
ships for mir n«v> and transport, and aeroplanes for sir service. 

Have a glorious part in thii war for Liberty, 
Righteousness, Peace, Justice and Humanity 

Buy a Bond and Wear a mi i ion 

At mi) Bank or Bond Dealer 
LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE OF NEW EHGLAND 



ties, in the classroom and on the rum- 
pus. We may make mistakes, but lets 
keepou our toes and play tlie £89)6 hard 
to the imir-li. 

Find out as soon as possible what is 
coming for the next summer's work- ami 
get ready in the spare moments with all 
the advice, notes, literature *ud ether 
information neeessarv. and tlnn ii*c ii. 

Aggie turns out leaders, not followers: 
our men made good In the emergency 
last summer, and with the knowledge 
of what is coming next spring, we must 
be ready. Forward everybody. 

1'iiok. ii. k Bobbins, 



BUDGET FALLS THROUGH 

The ambitious hall million dollar 
budget for 1917 and the two hundred 
thousand dollar a year program for six 
years asked from the slate legislature 
by President Uuttertield and approved 
by the board of trustees last January 
was practically eut out in its session. 

It was inevitable that the college 
should sillier beeause of the stiff 

economy on aoeoaai of the heavy war 

expenses now being carried by the stale. 
A total «>f $ai, (mm i was appropriate for 
the inaintainanee of i he various depart 
meats and executive offices, Oncol ihe 

last bills signed was an appropriation 

for $-io.tMMi for Improving the college 

power plant and ttndtfgfottnd sieam 
lines. The college wanted 180,000 for 
this and |7&,000 for equipment and main 
laiuauee but the Strict wai * eeoiiomy led 
to cutting them down, < »ui of a total of 
■JtKi thought neeessary for the com- 
ing year I he slate legislature appropli- 
aleri ««m,tHH>. approximately mie-llft h. 
The ei. liege failed to gel much which 
it wanted, Including $2"h>,ooo lor a new 
library, $4,200 for an additional poultry 
plant : $50,000 for a new student dormi- 
tory; $10,000 tor Improvements to the 
<liuing hall: and 99,000 for equipment 
t<>i the rural engineering slnqm. 



WRESTLING MATCHES PROVE 
TO BE POPULAR INNOVATION 

■Something new in sopbomore-freab- 
man contests was started tins year in 
Ihe form of wrestling bonis between 
representatives of the two lower classes 
to take the place of the usual rasoo 
parties on the first Wednesday night. 
\ platform was placed across the brook 
In the held in front ..t Draper Hall and 
ropes were stretched around it. Teams 
of five men ftom each class met in this 
"squared circle"in bonis..! three rounds, 
each round lasting three minutes. The 
sophomores won three of (he five bout*. 

Hrighaui '21 vs. Woodward *§Q was the 
first match, and the former won on a 
decision In the first round and with a 
fall in H:'.Vi in the second round. 

The second Imuii, between l.eavill ''21 
and Blanchurd 'W, provided considera- 
ble excitement, and needed i bree rounds 
for a decision, Leavitl secured a fall In 
1 :lo In the first totted, the second was 
declared a draw, and l.ea\itt won the 
decision with a fall in 1 :55 In the third 
round. 

Lent *S0 defeated Sloan 'ii on points 
to two successive rounds, scoring (he 
first victory for hi* claw 

l»on Smith 2(> secured a fall over 
Labrovlts *21 in 2:46 in the first round 
and won his bout by a fall in 35 seconds 
over Ihe three minutes ot the second 
round. 

Newell "#> look the final bout from 
Reed '81. bringing victory to his class, 
by securing a fall in 1 :4n and winning 
the second round on points, 

"Tug" Kennedy of Amherst refereed 
the man lies While the wrestling was 
not MlenUAc, It wa* full of jazz, and 
provided some real entertainment. 



JUPITER PLUVIUS AS USUAL. 

Cannot Break Up T. M. 0. A. Re- 
ception, However. 

Despite a united offensive of the ele- 
ments ot Mother Nature upon the cam- 
pus, one of the most successful of the 
annual V. M. r. \, receptions held in 
the Social Union rooms Pridaj evening. 
The student body ami faculty turned 
out in numbers greatly in excess of 
three hundred, well taxing the capacity 
of the hall, for the purpose of introduc- 
ing t he entering class to their new life 
at at, A. < . 

In Ihe receiving line were President 
and Mis. Huilertield, Dean and Mrs. 
Lewis, Dr. and Mrs. Marshall, and Prof- 
ami Mrs. Patterson. Kaeh freshman 
was given an opportunity lo become per- 
sonally acquainted with the faculty 
after which followed a general student 
gathering. 

Enthused with DOW acquaintances and 
Aggie spirit , the future leaders of Ihe 
world were given new ideals to follow 
by several speakers who were Intro* 
dued by Howard &. Russell "1*. l'rot. 

Hicks spoke in general of the athletic 

Battalion and the new recreation plan 
for sophomores and juniors. Uobert 
L, Boyd *1K president of the association 
explained ihe program for the year, 
outlining some new features. Marshall 
D. l.apnhear 'IX, gave a llowery speech 
on the social advantages open to Ihe 
freshman at the college and announced 
the intention ol getting the ( oi.i.m.1 \n 
to our boys in service. "Ted" Reiiman 

'18 explained the various ne\% athletic 

activities and evoked applause at the 
suggestion ol CO-eds plus knitting. The 
speech making lor the evening was con- 
cluded by President Butterfield who 
spoke ol the work the Y. M. «'. A. is 
doing tor the soldiers of the world and 
t he need of physical and mental develop" 
meat, The reception closed by the 
singing of the col lege song. 



LOST- 61 NIGHT SHIRTS 

The sophomores won the nightshirt 
parade contest Thursday night by a 
score of hx to 44. The rules were 
changed and elaborated a little this 
year by the addition of two pans at 
Opposite sides "I thC held, one lor 
each class. It | man was put in a pen 
he was i uleil oiii oi t he contest . and his 
capture counted a point lor the opposing 
side. A nightshirt torn oil by a sopho- 
more counted a point, and one retained 
b\ a freshmen counted a point tor his 
side. The sophomores put 27 men in 
their pen and took oil 01 nightshirts. 
The freshmen retained S4 niyhtshirts 
but only captured 10 men. 

ilrigltani 21 was the star of his claws, 
putting three sophomores in the pen, 
ami not CVCti losing a button from his 
nightshirt, while Bacon and Hon Smith 
each put several freshmen out of the 

contest. 



SENIORS ELECT OFFICERS 

The new officers for the Senior flans are 
as follow- •. President. Howard I,. Rus- 
sell. Worcester! Vice- president, 8, M. 
Richardson Montague; Secretary, 
Thomas E tarter. West Andover: 
Treasurer, Marshall**. Laepbear, Wind- 
sor, Ooon.; t'aptain, Oliver (*, lioberts. 
Boston : Mearitent-at-arma, Olln Hayes, 
Lawrence; Historian, Miss Elisabeth K 
Addlton, Newtonville. 



"Hob" Westroan '17 has been on the 
campus this week. He worked for the 
Ames I'low f'o. this summer, anil is now 
waiting to be called to Ayer. 



HE AIM 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best dressed 
men in your college : 

To keep our lines of young men's tugs so utterly smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years* experience. 

Highland Heather, •>" unusually smart •• trench" overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, beal tent made, 
Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50— $6.00 

At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, - Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



Protect Your Collet Obligations 

WITH AN INSURANCE POLICY 

Cost per year, $8.54 per 1000 

Si-iul me an ilhiM i.it i"ti of JilMive |M>llr> . 



N.nrii- 



\iMresa 



M.ui ronnrtn i» WAI.Imi l». r. m:i ■ •« *o», 

3d National Hank Iildtc.. HpilnKflt'lil. .Mat*. 



TOWN HALL 

Entire Change 

of 

Program 

DAILY 



ADMISSION 

Afternoon* »t S oVIiwk, «datt» ttc, chil- 
dren $*. KlMlllfHI *"' link— entlie floor 
I5t, lml<<m> 2t*. 

H«x offiie ii|i«mi» at S4t ami 7-30 «'i loek. 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amhent, Maas, 

Office Hoon : » to 12». a., 1-an h>B p. ■. 



RAHARS INN 

Northampton. M»iM<-!,m«Ut 

■HtaMWAM 



Th« Beit Piaea la Dine 
All Ki«4i »f Sm Fata 

Mevt me »t |ileke>'» 

— —A l* fatta Miftia 

6-.10 a.m. to 11-30 p.m. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Ne\» tO < MBpkm'v 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pent 

Aacnta for Itfx Typewriter 
P. M. CURRAN C. F. DYFR 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

Rl 'tis AND CARPETS 
— K. D. MAItSII MffAYK — 

Stkpiikn Lank Fol«fk. tine, 

IHO ItKOADWA Y. NKW VOHk 

<:r,Ull AND ffOIiTi^hlB 

I'INH AMI KINlis j» 
<><>' t>. -.11 vkm < mii linini mbem i <m 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

Ontooptitri 

7* Mam M. 

■V • . It I l i i f • 1 | . t . . I l . Mil-.-.. 



Writing Paper 

With Class Numerals and College Seals 

All klnilH nt 

Loose-leaf Boohs and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

»9J-397 High St. 
—SELLS— 

Hart Schaf f ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come <lown to Holyoke kod Me our 
big store. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917. 



i.eckman'8 | Dr. a. H. Daniels, D. 0. 
Candies and Ice Cream 



•* HAMP " 



OSTEOPATH IT I'll VHM IAN 

305 LAMBIE BLOB., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone 



BUY vui H 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 



"BIDE- A- WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

Our Specialty-And other Rood things to eat, . UUC0C T IliCC 

MRS. L. M. STEBB1NS, A. W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. i ,»u at tbt Dernw sad Fraternity Mo.ih.-h. 

Tel. 41 5- W 

AMHERST GARAGE CO., inc. 

Automobile »*tl»litl*?« 

„,„„-. VULCANIZING 

REPAIRING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



Carptrvter & Morehous?, 
PRI^TlCnS. 



No i, Cook Place. 



Amherst. Man.-* 



DAVIES KILLED IN FRANCE 

Ontario Agricultural College, 
tiuelpb, Canada. 

May 7th, li>17. 



It seems Strange tliai the only two 
men who. up t° tbe present, have gone 
to the from from your instil iiti.ui should 
Seel their death there. 1 expert you 
in .liied l.y the list which 1 forwarded 
that K. I*. Havies hud heeii killed. It 
mlgbl he of some interest to you to 
know that tltis occurred in a most 

treacherous way. Davie* was in charge 
of a detachment in the capture of the 
tamoua Begin* trench. H»- was round- 
lag up a bunch of prisoners and was 
about to search a Set-man oflieer who 

had his hands Dp when he was shot a 
number of tunes in the head with a 
small automatic pistol whieh the Ger- 
man had concealed in his hand. The 
men who were with Davies kieked the 
German to death. It is acts such as this 

whieh make I lie war perhaps a good 
.leal morel.itlei than is ot l.erwise might 
be. I thought it might be of some ! n- 
t crest to you to know just how l»a\ics 
met his death. 

Very truly yours, 

J. H. llAMUKIi, 

Secretary. 




IffWf/ff //&////// ' 








A 






• 111 si- 
as It 



rim 






&?<#t* 



■3*5 



AC H I EVBM ETn) T 



m 



i 



Twenty-five years ago the General 
Electric Company was founded 

Since then, electricity has sent its thrill 
through the whole structure of life 

Eager to turn wheels, to hft and carry, 
to banuh dark, to jpther heat, to hurl 
\oices and thoughts across space, to 
grvc the world new toob for rts work 
— electricity has bent to roan's wiH 

Throughout thu period the General 
Electric Company has held the great 
responsibilities and high ideals of 
leadership. 



It has set free the spirit of research. 

It has given tangible form to inven- 
tion, in apparatus of infinite preeuion 
and gigantic power. 

And it has gene fortkeo-operating with 
every mdustry, to command this unseen 
force and fetch it far to serve aD people, 

By the achievements which this com- 
pany has already recorded may best 
be judged the greater ends its future 
shafl attain, the deeper mysteries it 
yet shall sdve m dectrifymg more 
and more of the world* s work, 



\t 




( IENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 



AUDITORIUM TO BE NAMED 

IN HONOR OF BOWKER '71 
Hereafter assemblies will he held in 
Bowker Auditorum rather than just 
plain Stock bridge Hall. Through the 
unanimous vote of the trustees the new 
name was decided upon last Friday. 
Mr. Bowker was a member of the class 
of '71 and for thirty-one years a trustee 
of the college. He was one of the most 
enthusiastic workers for M. A. 0, even 
up to the time of his death last year. 
Bowker Auditorium, itself obtained 
through his influence, is certainly 
fittingly called. 

ATHLETIC BOARD ELECTIONS 
The following men have been elected 
to the Athletic Board from the three 
upper classes, the freshmen not having 
elected their men as yet: B. M. Rich- 
ardson "18, Montague : O. <:. Pratt 'lx, 
.salem: John Yesair 'lu.Byliehl ; Parker 
Whittle '1». South Weymouth: Phillip 
Newell "20. Newton; Warren DawtOg 
»SfJ, Kingston. There will be a Meeting 
of the board tonight, Wednesday, for 
discussion <>l athletic activities, for the 
coming year. 

HALF HOUR LESS TO SLEEP 

Because of the shortened college year 
Agglfl men arc making longer days t hail 
in previous years. Classes begin at 
7-40 in the morning and continue hourly 
until ll-HO. Chapel exercises are held 
al 11-40 instead of 7-U0 as formerly. 
Ill ill also comes from H-40 to 12 40 ill 
the morning; freshmen Tties.lavs and 
Thursda.vs and sophomoies Wednesdays 
and Saturdays. Afternoon drill and 
assembly are held as usual. Wednesday 
afternoon. The afternoon schedule be- 
gins at 1-40 and is concluded ai .'.:{o. 



FRESHMAN ELECTION RESULTS 
The freshmen elected their officers al 

a re.-.-nt mcetitm, for the first term. 
President, Halph l.eavitt. Melrose :(Kcn- 
ton elected but resigned) Vice-president, 
Kiilph Stevens, Arlington; Secretary. 
Miss Marion liussert. Boston : Trcasin.i. 

.instil, McCarthy, Arlington; Captain, 
John l». Brik'ham. Sutton; .Seargent-at- 
arius. Richard Melleu, <atnl.ridi:e; and 
Historian. William Lyon. Kant l-exiim- 
ton. 



VI8ITS "KID" GORE 

ri..l. Curry B. HlCSS has just returned 
from I'laltsbiirg where he paid a short 
visit to " Kid" (lore who is attending the 
second .amp. Among the numerous 
edibles which Pro!, Hicks carried down 
yyith him was two pounds of nicely 
cooked tripe of which "Kid" is especi- 
ally fond, and which he will, no doubt 
consume all in one meal so long has 
it been since he had such a luxury. 

OOE3 TO MALAY STATES 

<;. K. Percy *1B, resigned (his spring 
as graduate assistant in the Chemistry 
department and accepted ■ position as 
mycologist In the British Kubher Com- 
pany, Hwlels Financiere des Caoul- 
ehonc, Kent Estate. on their plantation 
at Batu Caves, SelutiK'»r, Federal Malay 
Stales sauchettl lf», is in the Mffll 
company as an agriculturist and the two 
men wlllhe associated In the work of 
the larye rubber plantation. 



Any student who nnderstands practi- 
cal photography might find regular em- 
ployment in the Division of Horticul- 
ture, 



'«!.— Waugh is in 
< ..i pg in Frame. 



an 



Ambulance 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
"dead one." 



Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 




that have pep. 



MERRITT CLARK & CO., &8*Kr 



THE 



United States Hotel 

I'.Hurh, Lincoln and Klnicstun St- , 
BOSTON, HASS. 



Only two blocks from Sooth Terminal Sta- 
tion, and easily reached from North station 
by Kievated Hallway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and business centre, 
also to the theatres and places of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpaued. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HiCKEY, 
Pnprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 




Cow 
Owners 

Expect More 

From a 

01 LAVAL 



re cream 
longer wear 

better service 

-b etter value 

And They Get It 

A catalogue of the New De 
Laval machines will be gladly 
sent on request. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



1W Broadway 
SBW YOBK 



m X. Madmos Br, 
CHICAGO 



GET THE LIBRARY HABIT 

Recalling President Biitlerlield's very 
wise counsel about speeding up and 
making the very most of .mis opportu- 
nity, perhaps all studentsan.t e* pedal 1) 
the younger men can prolit l.\ remem- 
beiino the college l,ibl'ar> and the help 
offered by th-U department, Kverv bit 
Of its equipment, books, bulletins, peri- 
odicals, etc., is for .student use. For 
optional as well as required reading, 
the librarian and his assistants are readv 
to be of assistance. In this, SS In Other 
good things, the students are urged to 
oet the habit, tin. I out some of the latest 
bulletins, good books, Of pa in J -lib-is 
likely to be of ureal interest totli.m, 

and continue t.. be regular patrons ol 
the place. 

In addition to the main libraty, 
which Will beopeli iroinS-IK) v.M.lo i»-B0 
p. m. without Interruption and perhaps 
longer if opportunity permits, students 
should keep in mind the very attractive 
branch library In Stoekbridge hall. A 
goodly collection of the latest ami heal 

farm papers, agricultural books, and 
experiment station bulletins will be 
found on hand, in addition to a card cat- 
alog and other indexes making the ma- 
terial readily available. 

Library News 

Two lame volumes ol newspaper 

clippings, araoged alphabetically, < - 

Isining many items ol interest about 
the faculty and students sf Aggie, both 
past and present, are now in the library. 
They afford an extremely interest inu 
method of obtain Ins InformaUon other- 
wise obtainable. 

Prof. Frank 1*. Hand litis recent l> 
published a small volume called "Tia- 

mat and Other Verses," filled with 

poems which are both humorous and 
serious. 

A bulletin on " I loiisliold and < amp 
I ttseCt S" Kphiaim I'. t'ell.Sc. I)., of the 

class of "ni. is now in the library, The 
complete proceedings el the American 

Federation ol Labor From l**l to 1SM.">. 
nicely bound, may alto be obtained 
t here. 

kayone working in pomology will be 
interested in the volume published bj 
the New York Agricultural Experiment 

Station called "The I'eaehes of Now 
Vork."* 

Miss Vivian 1.. Hoy of Holyoke, h.r 
the pant two years a part of the library 
staff, waa married Wednesday, Oct, 8, 
to i.eorge A. Scheibel of Qulncy. 



A FLYING TRIP 
Harry I.ydiard '17, paid a short visit 
to Amherst last week— a flying visit 
so called. lie WHS OSS ol a party 
of six who landed limn the balloon 
America 11, which had jusl made a trip 
from the aviation school at Itoekville, 
Conn. They were three hours making 
inu the tlv and were once lost in the 
clouds orer hanging the mountains. 



FRESHMEN 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St, Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass, 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



Ct—dmlyfmtA. M. U 4 A.M. 



Start your college year right. Buy your 
clothes and haberdashery where you can 
buy it to the best advantage — where you can 
find the largest variety and best merchan- 
dise made in the beat styles at fair prices. 



Sheepskin Lined Coats, 
Sheepskin Lined I Isters, 
Snappy Top < oats, 
Reversible Collared Shirts, 



$6.50 to $10 

$13 to $24 

$12 to $30 

$1.50 to $5 



Suits in Every Style and Price 

Guyer Hats 

Manhattan Shirts 

Aitman Cravats 

OaKes Sweaters 

Interwoven and Holeproof Sox 




OoMVlei.'. *l«rt Scbsff«#r * Mar* 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

ll.-iit S.'luilln.r .V Mnrx ClotliL'-l 



School and College Photographers . . . 







LOCALLY: 5 2 Center St., Northampton, Mass,, 

and South Hadley, Mats 



Main Offici; 

i$4o-»54 8 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios otf er the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



:».»AVAy, ' wnwww BiP 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

Write *c»*l«»>' lor prices on 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1357 The INnGhm tmrmtrt' 5i.nd.rd f.r Si.tr Tears 1917 

Ask For Oir Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 
I 



A.idreMM AitiMioy Man«ser 






THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

^utwIiiLifj of the 4m«ri«'*n Asricnltuml I' lmkl l ( ■■. 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



.•.VAV.Va 



A 



of 



I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1917. 



THE ENTERING CLA88 

[Continued from paije 1] 



Long. A Halt D. 
Lovcring, Holland W. 
Mackintosh, Charles. «■ 
liaoLftren, .lames K. 
Marsh, Waller A. 
Martin, Edward \V. 
McCarthy, Justin 
Meister, Joba .1. 
Melleu, Richard 
Miller, Charles N. 
Miller, William II. 
Moody, Kennel h 
Palmer. Charles 
Palmer, Walter 1. 
Parke, Franeis K., Jr., 
Peek, Hie hard C. 
Perry, John T. 
Pratt, Laurence F 

Preston, Kverett C. 
Quint, Isador G. 
Heed, Paul M. 
Reynolds. Franeis ('. 
Uiee, Henry L. 
Rich. Milton 8. 
Richardson, Marjory 
Richardson, Raymond IJ. 
Ritlenhurg, Isidor 
BobertaOB. Lalayetle J 
Robinson. Philip L. 
Rogers, Charles B. 
Rosort, Samuel L. 
Russell, Charles F. 
Rnssert, Marion 
Sanborn, C. II. 
Sanford, H. II. 
slate, Qeoige 

Sloan. Kenneth 
.spencer, Orville 11. 

Starkey, Robert L. 
Stebbins. Frederick t>. 
Stevens, Ralph s. 
Stiles, Harry S. 
Thybergi Qeorge J. 
Tillson, Reginald 1). 



Chlcopee 
Noil liaui|iiiin 
Peabody 
Sutton 
Hidden 
A in heist 
Arlington 
Dore lies t ei- 
Cam bridge 
Chatham, N. J. 
Springfield 
lirookliue 
Boston 
Greenfield 
, Stoneham 

Mielburne 
Walt ham 
North Weymouth 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 
Baldwinville 
I lad ley 
Somerville 
Medfold 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



Thera are Seven Good Reasons why you should 
buy your 



COAL 

or 

C. B. ELDER 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

DNQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan 

The Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

For information write to 

ELLIOTT HENDERSON, Special Agent 

79 Milk Street, 
Boston, . • • Mass. 



Millis 
lirookliue 

Pore bastex 

Hartford, Conn. 

\cw Bedford 

Kaldea 

Springfield 

Winelieildon 

Boa too 
Springfield 

West field 

liernardston 

Amherst 

New Haven, Conn. 

Pitchhurg 

Deerlield 

Arlington 

Lynn 

Springfield 

Whitman 

Worcester 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass, P«p«, Valve* 
*nd Fittings tor Meam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors lor Steam and Hot \Vater Heating. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and fcngirie 
Connections. - Holyoke, Maaa. 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



SHOES WITH UNEQUALED PRICES 

Direct from the factory. 

Latest in Spring and Summer Styles 

Best (iuality— Satisfaction guaranteed 

"GYP" GOODWIN '18, AX A House 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 



Traleoe, George 9. 

Vim Lennep. Kmily R. Great Harrington 
West, Guy C. Kmeslmrv 

Whittle. Wallace I.. Weymouth 

Wilson. < '. W.S...Ir.,\cw Rochellc.N.Y. 
Woo.l, Clarcnee M. Sotuerville 

Woodworth, Leveret t S. Newton 

/ytkiewiez. John M. ChleepM 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'IS.— Albert F. Edminister, a former 
ritle team Captain at Aggie, reeently 
married Kli/.abeth F. Tahott of Ames. 
Iowa, where they are now living. 

17,. -"Bud'* Ross in in Franee a* an 
i rbeenratton I Ifitoar. 

'IK,— Frank Bainbridge is at the Vic- 
toria College for aviators in Toronto, 
hut expect* to be transferred soon. 

»18._««p a t" MoNaught in stationed at 
(JaoipBthan Allan, Hurlington, Vt, 

18,— For the pa»t week Forrest Hance 
hai been on the campus previous to hi* 
call as 2n«l Lieutenant in the Artillery 
Sect ion , Patterson, He expects to leave 
h wofl H bu wnpinv has been sup- 
plied with uniformsby the Government. 

The following men are at the second 
iMaltshurg Training Camp : 'la, Dodge, 
Hills; *13, Gore, Clark, II aeon; '14, 
llrown, Tower, Wheeler; *15, I,ewis, 
Montague*. '16, Huntington; ex-T7, 
Dudlv: 1*. Moynehan, Bpaulding, 

IH,— Robert §. Boles is on the 1'. s. 
S, Machlgone stationed at Providence. 

town. 

• PL— "Windy" Babeook is a 1st Lieu- 
tenant at the L*. S, Avintkm School, S. 
K, B, 0. at Mineola, L, 1. 

17. — Al HpaaldiBg is a corporal with 
Sect. 39 of the U, ft. A. Ambulance Ser- 
vice* American Expeditionary Forres, 
vlaN.Y. and Pari* 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Iutercol. Athletics, 

ML A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non- Athletic Association, H 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doiaters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



C. A. Peters, Secretary — 454-W 
H. M. Gore, Secretary— 4 03-M 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403-M 
E. Robbins, Manager— res. 62- W 

L. T. Buckman, President — 416 

J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 

U. D. Hawley, Manager— 8314 

O. S. Flint, Manager— 544-M 

W. S. Sawyer, Manager— "»4.*i 

L. N. Odams, Manager— 203- M 

S. F. Tuthill, President— 416 

A. F. Williams, Manager— 8364 

D. M. Lipahires, Manager— 416 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 8347 

K. M. Buffum, Manager— 8364 

1). O. Merrill, President— 416 

J. H. Day, President— 8377 

H. L. Russell, President— 11 9-R 

W. Hurlburt, President— 4 24-M 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



CARS 



Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 7-20, 8. 10, 
q 10, 10-20, and at 20 minutes past the 
hour until 11-20 P. M. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



CARS 



Drugs 
Sodas 

Cigars 
Candy 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml, alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains " to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mllea of Trackage -nodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System I- relght and Ex- 
preaa Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Company 



Leave Amherst for M. A. C. at 6 05, 6 25. 
7-00, 7-30, 8-00, 8-15, 9.15, 9-3°. ,ol S. «°-3°- 
,,., S , n-30, 12-30, 12-45. «-3°. '"45 and at 
45 minutes past the hour up to 9-45. and 
at 10-30 and 11 00 p. m. 
Last car at 12-30 A. M. 

Special Cart at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST It SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FDR HIRE 

(Jenta 1 Kurntantnmi Tieket Srstem 

11 AMITV STBttT 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



ONITY CHUKCH 

Pleasant Street, 

Regular Sunday Service at 10-45 A.M. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



Amherst 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the Beat 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

PROGRAM CHANGED DAILV 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade ColUgt Work 



Shirtav 
Collars, - 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
3 i-sc 

* I-3C 

48c per dot. 
- 30c per dor. 



DRY CLEAHIHO AHD PRESSIHG 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 Suits for $i.oo 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 

AH bills parable at Co-op. store and paresis 
left th«re will receive prompt attention. 

Oba ysoh '17, Agent 

Hia«i»BOTm*J» 17, ASSt. Asent 





AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 23, 1917. 



No. 2 



MR. DICKINSON TO ASSIST 
IN PHYSICALEDUCATION 

Special attention to Work. Election 

of Class Football and 

Track Managers. 

The following men have been elected 
class football managers: John N. 
Preble 'i«, Jamacta Plato; Pema w. A-l* 

den T9, Proctor, VI.; W. II. I'eekbam 
'20, Newport, It. I. ; ami George K. l-ock- 
w.N>k '21, Hyde Patk. A fairly large 
number of men have been out for prac- 
tice each day. hut there seems to he 
trouble in Hading ■ Uase when all the 
men from the same class can practice 
together. 

For the Junior-.Sophoniore tennis 
match, which should have been played 

last spring, I'ierson is managing the 

Junior team, ami Crawford the Sopho- 
moreB. 

Track managers have been elected by 
: lie classes as tollows: 'IX. Arthur Til- 

toii of Wellesley; '19, C. «•• Mail I, 

of IMllsriehl; and '20, Donald C. Doug- 
lass of Arlington. 

The nifhufi taken by the Senior clajw 
in electing their class manager was very 
unique, and will BO doubt be followed 
by other classes. The two men nomi- 
nated were "Toby" Roberts, and "Art" 
Tilton, the two largest men in the class, 
and instead of putting it to h vote, the 
decision was made that a race from the 
steps of Mockhridge Hall to the end of 
the board walk should determine who 
was to be manager. The race was very 
exciting and ended with two much 
winded Seniors, Tilton carrying away 
the honors. 



ANNUAL PRIZE CONTEST 
IN PASTORAL LITERATURE 



INTERCLASS FOOTBALL AND 
TRACK SERIES ANNOUNCED 



EVANS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

OF 1919 INDEX 



Junior Class Taxed to Aasure Fi- 
nancial Success of the Book. 



At a junior class meeting held last 
Friday, 1010 voted to put out an Index. 
To insure a financial aucoess in cane 
part of the class left college, it wan 
voted to pay a W lax apiece in advance. 
A committee eotttpoeed ox Hurt, Pelison, 
Faxon, hvnns and Collins was appointed 
to elect an editor-in-chief to lake the 
place ol Hathaway, who resigned. The 
committee met Tuesday and elected 
Mvrton F. Kvans of West .Sumerville to 
head the Index. Evann Is a member of 
Kappa Higma and has been on the (01,- 
1. Koi an board two years. The Index 
hoard plana to publish its volume about 
the first of April. 



Subject from Shelley's "The Invita- 
tion". Rules of the Competi- 
tion. Former Winnera. 

Students taking English 60, Miss 
(ioessmann's course in pastoral litera- 
ture, have chosen a selection from Shel- 
ley's "The Invitation," as the subject 
for their competitive essay this year. 
They will develop their work on the 
lines: 
"Away, away from men and towns, 
To me wild wood and downs." 
This subject was selected by me m hers 
of the class from a group of six sug- 
gested by Miss Hoessmann. The sub- 
ject was announced Oct. 16 and must 
be completed and returned to Miss 
OuiMMIIIIiii D»e« a - With il must be a 
bibliography of all works consulted in 
developing the theme. The papers 
must contain al least 2000 words and 
not more than 6000. 

The papers will be judged by someone 
selected by the class from the faculty. 
Baala of judging will be first , fidelity to 
the subject and clearness of ideas; sec- 
ond, F.nglish form, spelling, punctua- 
tion, and neatness of paper. Deau 
Lewis has been the judge for the last 
three years. 

A prize, to be announced later, will 
he awarded to the sludent with the best 
Baaaj. Prizes won during the last three 
years lire as follows; 

Charles II. Alden 1915. prize, Dr. Van 
Dyke's "Fisherman's Luck," auto- 
graphed and containing private book- 
plate, 

Benjamin A. Gilmore lttlft, prise, 
ttobett Frost's "North Ol Boston" and 
"A Hoys Will," each containing an 
original poem and autograph by the 
author. 

B. Walter Bulbar! ItlT, prize, Photo- 
graphs of John lliirroiighs and "Liter- 
ary Values" his favorite book and auto- 
graphed by the author. 

This year an unusual prt»e will be 
offered and one in keeping with present 
activities, ltcsulls of the contest will 
be announced alter the holidays. 



Interclass Meet Nov. 10. Plans for 

Grose Country. Managers 

Cannot Play. 

At a meeting of the Interclass Ath- 
letic Board, Oct. 10, it was decided to 
have an interclass series of football 
games and track meets. There will 
also be Interclass cross-country if enough 
men are interested. 

The sophomore-freshman interclass 
tennis match which was not played last 
spring will be held this fall, and candi- 
dates from the classes of 1919 and 1920 
should report to their respective class 
managers immediately. 

All four classes must elect managers 
for their football and track teams, ami it 
should be understood by the classes 1 hat 
the managers will not be able to play. 
All men who are to lake part in the 
football games or track meets must be 
certified for physical condition not later 
than the Monday before the event. 
This is imperative. 
The football schedule is as follows: 
Nov. 3, Seniors vs. Sophomores. 

Juniors vs. Freshman, 
Nov. 17, Seniors vs. Juniors. 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen. 
The track schedule is as follows: 
Oct, 20. Freshman tryouts. 
Oct. 27. Sophomore tryouts. 
Nov. I, Sophomore-Freshman Dual Meet 
Nov. 10, Interclass Meet. 
Nov, 17, Open Handicap Meet. 



TRACK NEWS 



FRATERNITY PLEDOE8 

Albert W. Meserve '20 and William F. 
Robertson *20 both of Framingbam have 
pledged Kappa Oamnia I'bi. William 
.1. Sweeney '19 of Dorchester has pledged 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



STOCK JUDGES WEST 

The M. A. C. stock judging team look 
pail in the judging competition at the 
National Dairy Show at Uolumbus.Ohio, 
last week. Every year Aggie is repre- 
sented al the national show by a team 
,.f three men, who have the highest 
standing in stock judging work here; 
the expenses of this team are defrayed 
by a purse presented by F. Lothrup 
Ames, proprietor of I>angwater Farms, 
North Easton, Mass, This year the 
team consisted of Et, W. Hurlburt *1H of 
Ashley Falls, W. O. Bruce '18of Spring- 
field, and B. It. Rosequist *1S of New 
Bedford, Prof. J. C. McNutt and Wil- 
liam F, Turner of the extension depart- 
ment accompanied the team and planned 
to stop at the former's farm. 



Preparation for Interclass Meets 

With the cinder track in the best of 
condition, and a good crowd out every 
day, outdoor track seems to betaking 
its place in Aggie sport. The freshman 
trials last Saturday showed some very 
likely material in '21. « roea c.uuiry 
practice begins this week in preparation 
for the Interclass meet. Sophomore 
trials are to be held Saturday, Oct, 27, 
ai 12-4.'., and are to be run off according 
to the following schedule : 

THAI K KVKN HI 

100-yd. trials 
Mile run 

110-yd. hurdles trials 
440-yd. dash 
100-yd. finals 
120-yd. hurdles finals 
2-raile run 
220-yd, 1 rials 
210-yd. hurdle* trials 
HMO-yd, dash 
220-yd dash finals 
220 - vd. hurdles Hnals 

riKt,r> RVEWTB 

Running high jump 
Shot put 
Broad jump 
Pole vault 
Discus throw 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 
TO BEGIN ON OCTOBER 25 

Six Positions on Editorial Board, Two 

on Business. Good Opportunity 

for Journalism Men. 

Competioti for positions on the editor- 
ial and business stall of the Coiikoi \ \ 
open to juniors, sophomores and fresh- 
men, will begin Thursday.! let .26. (Hi the 
editorial board there will be one place 
opee to juniors, three placet for sopho- 
mores and Iwo for freshmen. To be 
eleg'ble for election each competitor 
will be required to gel a minimum ol 
twenty-five credit points, these will be 
assigned tor ollice work, reprint writing 
such as reporting meetlnge, etc. and for 

original copy such as campus news, On 
lepiiul work one credit veil be glVM 
for each ten inches ut copy accepted.. 
Writeups that are wordy ami padded 
will receive no credit, however. Special 

credit will be yiven b>r lettefl obtained 
from Aggie men in service, in the 
trenches, in the military camps. 

In the business departuienl there am 
two places open to freshmen, one lead- 
ing to DBllnom managi 1 In the nenioi 
year, (he other to advertising manage] 
The rules of the com petit ion are as 
follows: 

1. Candidates shall be Voted on tint 

ina the nisi week ot March by members 

nl the < in, 1, M.i an then Bedding "Hk < 
A two-thirds vote is necessary lor 
election. 

2. The competition shall open <»>i 
26, 1917 and dose al midnight, March I, 
1W1K. To become a candidate for elec- 
tion each competitor must have 2.'. credit 

points before the eim "i ike <-.nitest on 
Starch 1. 

8. To he eligible lo compete for the 
editorial board a candidate must ban.! 
bis name to Marshall Lanphear '1* 
before Nov. 10, 1917. All f reshmen 
competing for a posiiioii on the builnets 
board must hand their names to Hirgei 
K. RoseqUlBt 'IK before Nov. 10. 

4, Points for the editorial competi- 
tion are gained as follows: 

Reprint matter, one point for each ten 
inches of copy accepted. 

Original copy, campus Rules, etc.. one 
point for each six inches accepted. 

Special credit for Aggie news letters 
secured from men in service. 

Office work, one credit for every two 
hours of work. Most of tbhl will be 
done Monday evening*. 

All copy must be clearly written <*»<l 
on one side of the papei onlj Type- 
written work is preferred. Copj mnei 
be In at least by Sunday night In gel 
credit for the week's Issue. l« shoahl 
be dropped In the box in the Col Ll <.i * \ 
office. Copy will be graded god credited 
in conjunction with the depart men! ol 
journalism. Students lakiny joiiralii.ni 
may hand Is carbon eoptet to lh* Cot.- 
I i.i.ni i\ and receive credit. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 



5. Credits for the business depart- 
ment are gained as fullows: 

One point lor two hours work. 
One credit for 14.00 new advertising 
or for$H.(M> renewed advertising. 

6. I'ositioiiH open are : 

Editorial department, limi-i, 1980-8, 

11)21-2. 

Business department 1021-2. 

7. The Coli.kgi.v.n board reserves the 
tight to withhold election in either 
department if the poor work of the can- 
didate so justifies. Furthermore, it 
reserves the right to change the above 
rule> at auy time deemed tit. 

Olliee work for the editorial depart- 
ment will begin Oct. 529. All candidates 
slo.uld report at the Coi.i.kuian office 
every Monday night at 8*80, 



BOYS IN SERVICE TELL 

OF THEIR EXPERIENCES 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
front.] 

Mineola, L. I. 
Aug. 20, 1917. 

As for myself, I have picked the most 
fascinating of all military service to me, 
the aviation branch. I was at M. I. T. 
for six weeks at a ground school, and 
then came down here to Mineola three 
weeks ago. I started out tlying with an 
instructor in a double seated, double 
control machine. This lanled over a 
period of two weeks, and for the last 
week I have been piloting a t'urtiss J. 
M. biplane alone. When I left college, 
I hard I > thought in three months 1 
would lie going through the clouds at 
seventy miles an hour. 

I expect to be here at least two weeks 
more and then go to an advance school, 
and then over to action. 

My address is l*. S, Aviation School, 
\. s..s. o. u. v. Mineola, u. I. 
Very truly your s, 

i*. it. ftaaoMK. 



at college this fall 1 am trying lo do 
''my hit" for our country. 

My address is Ralph U. Uowinar, 
Private, % Medical Department, 1st 
Hegiment IT. 8. Engineers, American 
Expeditionary Forces. France, Via New 
York. This rank of "Private First 
Class" does not mean anything in the 
military world, but it docs to me because 
it 1b the first step upward that always 
brings encouragement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kai.pii H. Bowmau, 

M. A. C.Ex-'8(). 
o. K.. II. L. Taylor, Capt. 



Co. G Third Provisional Battalion, 
Ft. Leavenworth, Kans., Sept. », 1017. 



The News Letter, which is roaming 
around the post, brought to my atten- 
tion the fact that I have not recently 
turned in any information concerning 
my movements. I am here at the Service 
School with the rest, and have the 
"hopes" of going over, perhaps soon. 
There isn't very much lo say— we jnst 
wait till the time comes, then we do. 
As soon as I leave Leavenworth, ray per- 
manent address will be"37th Infantry ". 
Of course the local address will vary 
according to circumstances, for a time 
it may be Laredo, Tex. 

My brother '20, is still with his out- 
fit, now known as the H34th Infantry, 
U. S, N. &,, the Mil Division. 

Our last wish Is to get back to the 
college once more for a few minutes of 
more before we go over. 
One of old 'ltf, 

Justin S. II km kn way, 
1st Lieut., 37th U.S. Inf. 



What Do You Want ? 

WANTED : A room for two gentlemen 
with bay windows. 

What Have You Got ? 

FOR SALE: Patent rights in Luther 
Sarhank's waterproof hay. 

What Did You Find ? 

FOUND : A gentleman's vanity case. 
Owner may claim in private by 
addressing "The Collegian." 



Victoria College 
Toronto, Ontario, 
Sept. 21, 1917. 

With sincere sorrow and best wishes 
for a successful season I tender my 
resignation as business manager of the 
Roister Doister. My affiliations with 
the society have always been a great 
pleasure to me and I am indeed sorry 
that they must now end. 

I have been in Canada training with 
the Royal Flying Corps for two months, 
One more month ami we will return to 
the States. Most of the men who join 
the R, F. 0. are from the States. In 
fact about 86^ are from New York and 
about 10% are from Boston. One of my 
tent mates is a Williams "IS man. We 
from the States who are enlisted In the 
U, S. Flying Corps go through the same 
course of training as the men in the R. 
F.O. ;one to two weeks at t he Cadet Wi ng, 
four to six weeks at a ground school, 
three to four weeks at the first Hying 
school, one to two weeks at the second 
flying school, two weeks at the school 
of aerial gunnery. Our course is very 
thorough and one can and Indeed must 
learn much In such work. 

With best wishes, 
Frank Baisbhiook '18, 



SEVENTY-FIVE SIGN UP 

IN R. 0. T. C. COURSE 

There are about 75 juniors and seniors 
now in the reserve officers' training 
corps or approximately ofle half the 
enrollment of these classes. These men 
receive a definite amount of pay from 
the government to be paid in quarterly 
installments for their services which for 
the most part consist in instruction of 
the two lower classes. 

In signing up a man becomes a party 
of the following contract. "In consid- 
eration of committal ion of subsistence 
to be furnished in accordance with law, 
we hereby agree to continue In the R. 
O T, C. during the remainder of our 
course In M. A. C, to devote five hours 
per week during such period to the mil- 
itary training prescribed,and to pursue 
the courses of camp training daring 
such period as prescribed by the secre- 
tary of war." 

The summer training camps will prob- 
ably be held at some central point at 
which all R. o. T. 0, men from New 
England and New York institutions will 
be concentrated for four weeks inten- 
sive training and given the pay of a 
private m well as transportation. 

The first term work will consist of 
close order work, the winter term will 
be devoted to indoor work including 
target practice and calisthenics and the 
third term to close and some extended 
order work and ceremonies. 



If you want to buy a bed, or sell that old mackinaw, or get rid of some 
books, or let somebody know you sell theme paper, etc., etc., etc., there 
are two alternatives: Kither take a chance or reach every student through 

"ThK Coi.LEGIAN." 



The rates are ioc a line an issue, address included. No advertise- 
ments for less than three lines. Drop your order in the mail box in "The 
Collegian" office or see the advertising manager. 



THE DAVENPORT 

The unsurpassed eating house for "Aggie" men and their frit 

AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 



-Twi the beu<i<|iiarteri for *TI- 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



H. I,. RtfWKLL. Mur.. 'is 
K. M. HUFKl'M. IK 



K. B. COLLINS. *1S 
F, K roi.K, '» 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 



Sept., 1917. 

Our regiment arrived safely in France 
about -weeks ago, and we are all In ex» 
oellent spirits. While I regret that 1 
shall not be able to continue my work 



CHAPMAN ELECTED MANAGER 

John A, Chapman '18, who would 
have been manager of football this 
fall was elected manager of basketball 
for this winter by the action of the joint 
commit tee on intercollegiate athletics, 
lie will replace Lester W, Odams *1« 
who is now a 1st lieutenant in the 
United state- Reserves, 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 

OUB STOCK IS COMPLETE— We carry a full line of note books, paper, stationery, 
toilet articles, novelties, fountain pens, banner*, candles, tonics, ice cream, etc, 

OUB 8TOBK IS HANDY -Waste no time In finding the path that leads to our 
door. Obey that impulse and pay us a visit. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown by the Floricultural Deft. 

We offer our surplus stock of out flow- 
ers and plants at reasonable rates to 
students and faculty. This stock is 
grown In modern houses under ideal 
conditions. Hoses, earnations, Tiolets, 
chrysanthemums and sweet peas la 
season, 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

'!'•• !<• I> tic me 300 



The "Nonotuck'* 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



Club Breakfasts. 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon. 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 



M. A. C. TO SEND THIRTY 

SIX MEN TO THIRD CAMP 



A third series of officers training 
camps Is to start on Jan. 5, 1918 and :1<S 
M. A. C. men, alumni anil under-tfradu- 
ates between the ages of 21 and HI ami 
physically fit are to be admitted. These 
camps, as far as can be learned will be 
held at Yaphauk for this district and 
will differ from the 11 re I and second 
series In that they will restrict the can- 
didates to enlisted men and collegians. 
A limit of 24IH) has been n'lven for the 
number of college men representing col- 
leges, universities and military schools. 
The official announcement regarding the 
camps reads in part as follows: 

"With the object of training enlisted 
men of the regular army, National 
Ouard, and national army for appoint- 
ment as officers to till vacancies that 
may oecur in those forces, a third series 
of training camps will be organized. 
The graduates of these training camps, 
who may be so raised, will be listed as 
eligible for commissions as .Second Lieu 
tenants and will be eommissioned as 
vacancies occur. To these camp's which 
are primarily for enlisted men, it has 
been decided lo admit a certain number 
of graduates and uudergraduates, 21 
years of age or over, of universities, col- 
leges, and schools which have earned 
recognition by having had military 
training under army officers during the 
past ten years. The entire numbet of 
graduates and undergraduates to lie ad- 
mitted is24W0," 

Thestalement names universities, eol* 
leges, and military hcIkm. is whose stu- 
dents are eligible. The list Includes 
Yale university, Wesleyan university. 
Howdoin college. Harvard university. 
Williams college, Princeton university, 
Pennsylvania college, Norwich univer- 
sity. Connecticut Agricultural college. 
University of Maine, Massachusetts 
Agricultural college, New Hampshire 
College of Agricultural and Meehanical 
\ns, Hutgers college, Cornell univer- 
sity. Rhode Island htate college. Univer- 
sity of Vermont, Pennsylvania Mat.- col- 
lege, Massaelinsetts Institute of Tech- 
oology, and Pennsylvania Military col- 
lege. 
The military schools include St. Johns 

at Manlius. N. Y., and New York Mili- 
tary academy at Conwall-on-Hudson, 

Camps are to be established at the fol- 
lowing places: 

(A) One in each regular army. 
National Guard and national army 
division. 

(B) One each In the Philippines. 

Panams.and Hawaii. 

"(C) One each at Fort Bliss. Texas; 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas; and Chlea- 
mauga, Georgia." 

"Graduates and undergraduates who 



are eligible and who desire lo be ad- 
! mitted to the camps," the annoiiiice- 
I mem slates, "must apply on the blanks 
I provided for the purpose and forward 

the complete application to the instruc- 
tor in Military Taclies of the Institution 
from which the applicant graduated. 
Applications will be received between 
Oct. tfi and Dec. 1." 

fare! ul consideration should be given 
to tiie following provision by all pro- 
spective applicants among college men: 

1 'Graduates of the institutions listed 
will be required, upon reporting at the 
school, to enlist for the duration id the 
war. If after completing the three 
month's course they are not recom- 
mended for a commission they will be 
required to remain in the service and 
tinish preparing their enlistment as BOB* 
commissioned officer. While students, 

I hey will receive the pay and allowances 
of privates, iirst class; this will be about 
$30 a month plus food, clothing and 
quarters. 11 



Johnson Book Co, 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -:- 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



COLLEGE ELECTIONS 

New Men Chosen to Senate and 
Informal Committee. 
At the ma*s meeting of the student 
body last Wednesday, Robert L, Boyd 
of Lynn and Marshall O, l.anphear of 
Windsor, <onn. were elected to the Col- 
lege senate to nil the vacancies left by 

Lewis BpeuldlBg '18 and lioger Weeks 
*1H, both of whom are in the I'. 8. 
service. Raymond T. Parkhurst has 
been elected from the junior class to till 
the vacancy caused by the resignation 
of •'lias*' Pond who Is now in the Kn»i- 
ueering OorpS in France. 

Members to the inlorinal committee 
elected at. I lie same time were as fob 
lows: Oliver Pratt '1* of Salem, Arthur 
Tiltoii '1H of Wellesley. Thomas Carter 
'1H of Atidovet, t'arleloii Smith 'IN of 
West Newton, Stewart Ibilcheldel '10 of 

North Beading, Hubert Cslsbolm *li of 

Melrose ami Howard lioll "IS» of Cam- 
bridge. W. Irving Goodwin 'Wis chair- 
man of the committee, tilling the place 
of .Spaubling 'IH, resigned, and Stephen 
RIcBafdeon 'IS is treasurer. The Iirst 
informal will be held Saturday. Oct 27. 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Ihllm.m anil Iturm-H Streets. Unci' 
blocks from the t'nion Iiepiit, i» a modern lum- 
telrrrunon the European I'lun. It is just ;i step 
from Main Street, away from the nolne an<|dnst, 
and yet in the center of the business dlntrlct. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable- 
bavins a telephone and hot and cold running- 
water In e\er> room. Trices $1 and up; rooms 
with I 'itih (single) 91.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine ;nnt well ventilated din- 
ing room makes I meal a pleasant memory - 
ev err t lit ok of the highest quality, well cooked 
and ser\ed in the best possible manner 

Mtay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate utaying there again. Music eveiy 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel. Springfield, Hast. 



Eats. 



Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



Freshman Hats 



GOOD SERVICE 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 



Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Collene Shield. - • •■ 

Recognition Buttons 

(otiWandlngi 



TAKKJf 



K.T. l-ABKlll-SSTti 



S. S. HYDE 

jeweler and optto»«n 

1,1 IMeaaant Street 

.>—«-..< i •,..„• i lotions Filled. Hroken Lenses 

^eenmsfc He uVcnd. Kine Watch Kepstr- 

InV Promptly and Skiifu ly Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 




GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 



UMBIA 

19 Pleaawit Street 

Walk down town and create an appetlts. 
Hare la where foil Bud the pies wotnar makas. 

Uood Service and ReaaottaM* M**« 



VOTE TO SHORTEN RUSHING 
SEASON TO SUNDAY NIGHT 

The I nieiitatcriiit y Conference met 
Thnreday. ami tl.e ll*f dltettWhie re- 
sulted in a iiini ion betaf made to waive, 
tin tin* year, the rale vesting the vot- 
ing power iii tke senior repr esent a t ives 
or each fraternity. This notion whs 
passed. It was next voted in relet to 
the fraternities the qnestion of (shorten- 
ing the rimhlnu; season. by one w*ek. 
After this. President llu-.-ell read the 
Conference rushing rules, and Ibey 
were thoroughly discussed, A motion 
was passed in elect the vice-president of 
the Conference from the senior class, 
ami H. L. Boyd, I F #, was elected to 
this olllce. Aii announcement was 
made that the Social Union (.'mnBiUtee 
would like to meet with all senior mem- 
bers Botne time nest w«ek, 

Friday the Conference voted to 
shorten the rushing season by one 
week. The season will close Sunday 
evening at fJ-OO V. U. Pledge button* 
will be pnl on in Chape! Monday. 

HEADS NATIONAL COUNCIL 
President Hutterlleld was elected 
chairman ot the national service com- 
mission of the National Council of (Ion- 
gregalional churches held in Columbus, 
Ohio ft short time ago. It is the pur- 
pose of the commission to raise isIIMi.imhi 
to help work in armp cantonments. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

[TOR forty yeart we have rendered faithful tervke. Foe forty 

r years we have tried to make each year'i service more nearly 

ideal. This untiring effort ha* built for ui not only The Wodd*i 

Largest Mail Order Seed Business, but also a World Wide 

reputation for Efficiency and undisputed leadership. The 

Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual, th* 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" is brig*** and 

better than eve*. It is nailed free. A postcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower., 

Buildings PWkdelpbU 




F*a«e f » 



K3«13e3«t 



*« Shoe Store 

Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
pBlring-Reat leather uaecJ 



JACKSON 8* CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 



TtiE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday eTeninR 
by the .Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOAKD OF KMTORS. 
MAU8IIAM,0. LANPHEAR'IB.Edttor-ln-Chtef 
WKSI.KY S. SAWYER '1H. 



Athletic Editor 



ASSOCIATK ElUTOKR. 
AKTHIK N. HltWKN '19 

KUOT M, lilKKHM '19 

A I! I'lll li I.. < HAMH.KK *19 

MYRTON F. RVANB '19 



of stimulus urging us on to better ser- 
vice. By a very small tax on the stu- 
dent body and faculty, for surely they 
would aid, a service flag could easily be 
purchased. On it could be placed a star 
for every undergraduate or faculty 
member of the college who has eutered 
the military service. We recommend 
that a committee from Adelpbia, the 
senate or the student body consider this 
matter at once. Let us get a jump on 
the other colleges. Let us show the 
world outside how well our boys have 
answered the great call. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
BIWiKRR. KOSEQl'IST'lB. Kuiineaa Manaser 
SAMUEL H. KKKKI8H 'lit. Awiatant Manager 
ii. M. CAMPBELL IS, AdvertiatngManager 
JAMES C. MAIM.KS IS, Circulation 

(i. AI.KRKD SMITH '20. Circulation 

Subscription |V2.<H) per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Birder K. Rosequlst. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered aaaecond-rlaas matter at the Amherst 
Poet Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday. Oct. 23. *•. 2 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1017-1018. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anyihirg else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



In smother column announcement is 
made of the f'ni.i.Kin.VN competition to 
open Thursday. Every member of the 
junior, sophomore and freshman classes 
with the least bit of ability in writing 
or business work should be concerned. 
Here is a chance lo get into college ac- 
tivities at once. The Coi.i.kuias, of all 
lliings, must be kept going during this 
war. A good, live competition will 
mosl satisfactorily do this. It is well 
worth the while of any one who tackles 
the job with determination. It is ex- 
cellent training for the student taking 
journalism or majoring in any other 
subject. In a few years positions on 
the board will also be remunerated if 
present plans go through. If yon enter 
the competition you will never regret it. 



Mr. L, B. Dickinson '10. who has been 
the track coach at Aggie for several 
rears past, has been made instructor of 
Physical Education for this year, lie 
will devote halt his time to this, and 
during the fall will take full charge of 
track athletics which, on account of ex- 
isting circumstances, will cause much 
more interest than usual. Huring the 
winter be will acl as coach of I he inter- 
collegiate relay team, and next spring 
will again take up his duties as in- 
structor. 



Why Not a Service Flag, 
lx former years it has been custo- 
mary to give members of the football 
team, who have fought all through a 
long, hard schedule to uphold the honor 
..f old Aggie, a charm of tome sort to 
show the appreciation of the student 
bo.lv. This year there is no football 
squad. Bui, there is a much larger team 
lighting a much more deadly battle to 
uphold the honor of the country and 
this old college— a team composed of 
Aggie men in military service. What 
shall we give these boys in recognition 
of their services, to show our apprecia- 
tion ot their great work? It cannot be 
a charm for each member of that big 
team. Why can it not be a Service Fag, 
however 1 .' Flying from the staff on the 
Drill Hall, such a flag would Indeed be 
a titling momentoto our classmates who 
have made the supreme sacrifice. It 
would show them that Old Aggie bad 
noi forgotten their great work. It 
would act to us on the campus as a sort 



Dining Hall Again. 
We speak of speeding up production, 
speeding up college work. We are 
doing it— and far more— we are speeding 
up our poor health. In our hustle we 
are seriously endangering the very 
essentials of that speed, namely, good 
living. Never have eating conditions 
on the campus been so deplorable as at 
the present. Probably in no other col- 
lege in the country are they in such 
shape as at M. A. C. A small per cent 
of the enrollment are obtaining good 
board at private houses for a considera- 
tion of about 16 per week. They are 
fortunate. As the room at these places 
is limited, the other large percent of 
the student body is forced to eat at the 
cafeteria. Here conditions are far from 
adequate to accommodate all. At times 
during every meal the waiting line 
reaches even out into the campus. It 
is often necessary to stand 15 minutes 
in line for a dinner. Count this three 
times | day and il means three-quar- 
ters of an hour, multiplied by 27 weeks 
and gives about 140 hours wasted dur- 
ing the year just waiting in line for 
meals. A deplorable condition. Who 
said speed up our work '.' 

Moreover, after being served there Is 
still that hustle aud hurry. You seem 
to be caught up in that crowd sweepii g 
in and sweeping out and simply must 
join in. Such conditions as these will 
certainly do their bit for the Kaiser. 
Talk of speeding up work that is good. 
But it must not be at the expense of 
health ; it must not be at the expense of 
table etiquette. A nice condition to 
welcome freshmen into is this. They 
come lo the campus to get educated. 
They find the upper classes depleted to 
their best men, no loot hall to arouse in 
them true college spirit, not even a com- 
mon meeting ground where the student 
body can come 'together to eat as men 
should eat. Yet we expect them to up- 
hold the standards of the college. We 
expect them to conduct themselves well 
oD the campus. How can they learn to 
do it in such an atmosphere? 

To date only 43 men hare signed up 
for the new system at the dining hall, 
far loo few to insure its success. One 
hundred names at the least are needed 
to put the scheme through. In many 
cases it is mere negligence on the part 
of the men. They do not happen to be 
sear the dining hall so do not sign up. 
Perhaps if the paper were passed 
around in assembly it would receive 
more attention. Seniors, especially, 
should wake up. It is the final oppor- 
tunity for the class to gel together and 
enjoy life. In many cases men would 
gladly try the new plan but do not wish 
to wait on themselves. In the private 
eating places for six dollars a week the 
student gets good food and a waiter. 
Besides the proprietor makes some 
profit. It would seem that for a similar 
sum the dining hall, not supposed to be 
a money making scheme, could do as 
much. But if it cannot, let the fellows 
who wish hire tbeir own waiter, put- 



I will- will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Coi.i.mhan, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 



Dr. L. O. Whitman Cox Sons & Vining 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. TJ. Madison Aw.. New Vork 



Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 



Croysdale Jnn 

SOUTH HADLEY. MASH. 

Good Beds and Good Things 

t0 Eat ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 

Telephone KM-W, Holyoke. 




Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degrees 



m 




Will HE 

Come Back 

■ 

The probability is 
vastly greater if he i8 
properly equipped 
and trained 



Ts furnish our so!u. i . ..t.lors and airmen with arms, 
and food; to buy ships for our navy mtwI for transport, and-flying 
machines for air service, \hr Government Is a-diin^ you to loss 
it money. It gives in return its Bond, bearing interest, paid twice 
a year. The money h lo be nearly all «s|>riit in the InitcH States, 
but we are fighting for Liberty and Humanity for all the world. 

Have an Honored Place 

among your neighbors by doing the next thing 
to going, loan your money to the Government. 

Buy a Bond sine! Wear a Button 

A I any Bank or Rond Dealer 
LIBERTY LOAN COMMITT " OF NEW ENGLAND 






linu eleven men on a table, one to wait 
each week anil gel his board free, or 
Koine similar system. It this cannot bs 
accomplished, why not alter the tualo 
dialog hall lo accommodate the student 
hotly ■' Something must be dons at 
once. 

The old "hash house" problem is up | 
again as in every |iasi year. Hut il is ' 
more serious than ever. It is causing I 
us to holt from drill aud chapel like so I 
many pigs running to be ted, regardless 

of special meeting* Which should hold 
OS)T attention. In our hurry, that we 
may eat before the firs! afternoon class, 

we forget the manners of a gentleman. 
We b ecome , SI it were, mere animals. 
If the faculty, who must surely be wise 
to these deplorable conditions, will not 
take hold and help, let us us a student 
body do something, Let us place health 
and manners above study and money. 
Without the former it is impossible to 
speed up college work. Sign up at the 
dining ball and do your part 



SEEN ON CAMPUS 

Maurice Goldstein "17 was around the 
campus Momlav after attending the 
Springfield exposition. lie is doing 
chemistry sad microbiology work (or a 
large creamer) in lioston. 

Irving W. Installs I* was seen about 
the campus Sunday. "Uncle" says be 

is serving his country In (he Spring- 
Inld Arim>r\ . 

' I'ete" Matooii in iras ■ visitor 
■round campus last Thursday. 

"<hariie" .Moms i.; journeyed all the 
way from Ft. Ttconderoga last week 
|ust to pay his respects to m ami the 
Im.\s at Aver. 

Roderick Hall '18, ■ private In the 

dical corps, was on the campus last 

Sunday, He nays that until .Ian. I. 
11MM he can be found in the camp hospi- 
tal, Gamp Itaitleii . W.stticbl. 
"i.i. ii " Grayson 'lx, private in ibe 

no omtcd police, wa» up last Sunday lo 
review the college. Anyone going to 
Camp Deveiis will find "i«ki" keeping 
order "right mat the post office," 

\long with "l.oo" came "Ib.g" « ha in- 
here who is sporting (he uniform of 
"Boston's own 801*1 Regiment." tf« 
can be found In company I. 

Captain Frank Kd wards 17 and 2nd 
l.leut. "* liill*" Saville *1T spent .Saturday 
and Sunday in this vicinity. They came 
ii. mm Ayerlor tbe double purpose of see* 
ing the Smith girls and the Aggie boys. 

"Nate" «. i!lelte ex-1* and "Hub" 
Swift ex-'lH were around Sunday. They 
are botb at Ayer,"Hate"doing engineer- 
ing work while waiting for a Snd lieu- 
tenancy, for which he has passed the 
examinations, while "Hub" is a cor- 
poral Id the "Cape Cod Cum pan j 

INFORMAL SATURDAY 

With every evidence of a royal good 
time, the first Informal of rite year will 
be held Saturday, Oct. at. About :*i 
couples are expected to trip the "light 

lantastic" at tbe drill hall and enjoy 

the "bash bouse" steak Because 
Prexy's annual reception to the fresh- 
men also comes on that night, no 'H 
men will be there. The new college or- 
chestra will furni»h music They arc— 
Carl A.Ourshin, piano; C. o, llunbar, 
drums: Holmes, cornet: W. A, I. nee, 
violin: C, M. Wood, saxophone. 

Tbe cbaperones are as follows; from 
Mi. llolyoke, Miss Wheeler, Brigham 
Hall, From Smith. Mrs. H, I). S. Ol in- 
stead and Mrs. William J. Miller. 

BOgbolt *1B is seriously III at t he 
Infirmary with pneumonia. 



FOSTER MAKES GOOD 

Hamilton K. Foster '1H ol New |;.>- 
chellc. V Y., who left college last \'o- 
f ember for an army career has "made 
good." I'pon leaving college he 

gained a commission as second lieuten- 
ant in the I*. S. Infantry, and from 
January lo April received Intensive 
training in the school toruflteers at Fort 
l.ea\enw nit h , Kansas. From here he 
was sent to the Mexican border, where 

he served until June, lie was then 

ordered to France, and during the sum 

mcr received his commission as llrsl 
lieutenant of infantry. About two 

months iigo he was placed in command 
of a company, and about a month ago 
was detailed to serve as adjutant to his 

major, lie can be reached iiy corres- 
pondence through his Inline address, 
from where the letter will be forwarded 
to France. 



THE AIM 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best diesstd 
men in your college . 

To keep our lines of young men's togs so utlctly suiait and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing (hat we're spe< ialisls of twenty 
I five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart " trench " overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, bi m coal made, 
Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



AGGIE HONOR ROLL 

1 1. 1 1 old U. Kelly . National \ i m> . < amp 
Devcus 

tin.*. 

Donald II. ramie. liaiteiN l>. Mljnd 
field Utillciy DtVUdun -'•>. Am. 

I V I' e 

VMS 

Victor Petit, enlisted in infant r> 
F. K. Bsker, AriaMun i tups 

\\ . ».. Saw \er. Aviation Corps 
F. \. i.ilTord. I,,. H. iMttnd infantry, 
lamp Kevcns 

\ If, Howard. National Annv. (amp 
1 »e\ ens 

I'.'l'.' 
Jobs .1. Mahan ex-Ill, Aviation Corps 
F. K. Harvey. Depot Brigade, Camp 
Devcris 



At the Young" Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, • Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



I*. I,. Burnett, Ambulance Dorps 

H. C. L HITS MOVIES 

Alas, there scene. io be no end lo the 
caprices ol our old trieml. II. C, I.. He 
now appears in a form which will ailed 
STsrj mot tier's son of us. Listen — alier 
Nov. 1, there will l»c a 10 per cent tax 
levied on moving picture tickets, and as 
tract Urns of a cent arc reckoned as a 
whole cent, il mean* thai the evening 

tickets tor Amherst '"movlea will be 
■object to a tax ol two cents each. The 
Bsaaagsr «a« undecided whether tn 
bear tbe burden himself or pass it on to 
the public and as usual t he public Is 
!he"i;oai 



NEW GREENHOUSE 

A new gHMfthOMSe of the lean In 
variety ba« been erected just aoutfa of 
Clark hall lm Ibe use of tbe depart* 
men! ol plain idiyrdulogy. The struct- 
ure embraces all the area between the 
old greenhouse and the main bo tiding. 
Il I* c«|H'pped inside with t hre e long 
concrete table- and elecrtric lights, 
which will facilitate the work of the 
depart niBnt. There are two entrance* 
into tbe urcenhousc, on through the 
old physiological lab ami the other 
through the old hothouse. 



Cost per year. 



$8.54 per 1000 



Send lueiih illilNtrutliin of iiliovi' pollry. 

Vonc 

VllllrCHH 

M.ol ...ii|h.ii tu WAI.liO H IIAKI.OW int. 
:id National Hank lUila.. H|h inistielil Mum. 



Protect Your College Obligations AMHERSr shoe repairing and 

WITH »N INSURANCE POLICY SHOE SHINE PARIOR 

Next lo < anii'ioii's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pena 

AtfeDU for Hex T>|>cwrlter 

F. At. CURRAN C. F. DYFR 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUCJS AND CARPETS 

— K. 1). \l \ i:-ll tt«TATE — 

K«t . ink ■ ii i mu-i 

Stkimikn Lank Foi.cr*. >Iac. 

M 1 s. I I- ■ i I i I.i >..i .IMVII.HK 

inn bwudwav. nkw yowk 

<il.CH AND (ObbKliK 

IM.N'H AMI KlM.s j» 

»o»t. ii •nr.vnw *««i» rnonir miiiaia 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday, 
Oct. 25 



IXMltltc 

Hill 



Oet. 26 



trl *** 



Saturday. 
Oet. 27 



ami 

Rita Jotivei Hi " Jhm 

Unafraid' 

Dorothy Holly In "Jhm 
Lam Docldoa." parts. 

iA ■pawns »r "Fpm> fatal 
Ring.- Plotograph 

Cartoon. Hmtlc Si i.uli.n 
and Mandolin C'lnlM- 

f*ongy Hylantt 

In 
• ' Wild Animal* 



t l*ri» 
Hatha nawa 



Monday and a-****-*-* 

TMStay, 

Oet 29 Hi 

30 Paramount Com 



In 
"Broadway 

Path* mama 



deofge Cohan, Broad way *n gtsatssi 

star will be seen MoimIiiv ami Tui'sil,i> 
at tht 1 Town Hall in "Bioailwav .lones," 
n lypii'til \iiii'tt can |ilav emlorwii t»y 

t tie A is ericas public. Tats is ibe second 
of the famous Artt-raft productions, 

which are lining shown e¥«ry Monday 
ami Tui'sdsy, 






Dr. W. I*. Brooks ban written sn srfl- 
clc in the Signet, just ttmrjed, railed 
"The Form anl." 



E. B. DI0KINSON,D.D,S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amhcrit, Mass. 

f Hrire Hnun : 9 to H ». m„ I* fo B p. m. 



RUHR'S INN 

S'orthampton. MftMMtaMttl 

EUROrEAN PUN 



Read Our 

Appeal to Aggie Men 

on Page 4 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 



n Mala St. 

"V « •■-! I • • t i i i , .1 . >t i . MflBli, 

Writing Paper 

With Class Numerals lid College Seals 

All kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 



293-297 High Sl. 
SELLS— 



Hart Schaf f ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and ice oar 
bfg store. 



I 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 



HBLKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



• * HAMF»" 



" BIDE- A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our 5p«cialty-And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hartley, Mass 

Tel. 415-W 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OS1KOI-AT1IH PHYBN IAN 

305 LAMBIE BLOB., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



The E. E. Millett Estate 

A full line of r„lle«*- Jewelry »!««>» •« Stock 
llroken L« uses replaied while yon wait 



Telephone 



111 Y VOIK 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

el<-.. of 

A. W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I , ;,ll i.t the I»..nu8 and Fraternity llouxe*. 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



UNITY CHURCH 

1N.KASANT STItKKT. 

Regular Sunday Service at 10- 45 A.M. 

A <liureh home of the lilienil Fait h, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of lire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT UMPS UNO APPLIANCES 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the ISest 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

PROCR4M CHANGED DAILY 



Theiea.e^T-., Go.d Ke^cn-wn n-.u should 
buy your 



DR. WILSON OF HARVARD 

TO SPEAK WEDNESDAY 

The Assembly speaker Oct. 24th at 
•_>-:«> will he Prof, Meouce Grafton Wil- 
Bon, Dr. Wilson is at nreHeut professor 
of International Law at Harvard. He 
has studied at Oxford, Heidelberg, and 
in l'aris, was prolessorat Brown univer- 
sity for six years, exchange professor to 
Prance fur one year, and Berved aa Coun- 
selor «.t the American Legation at The 
HagUfl during the early period of this 
war. Dr. WiUoit has contributed several 
works OD international law, ami l» recog- 
nised as one of the toremosl aut ht.rities 
on t hi- subject. It is hoped that he 
will speak upon some aspects of inter- 
national relationship*. 

NEW TRIUMVIRATE 
An example of Aggie meu making good 

at tarm work is that of CM. l'hipps.S.S. 
Smith, an.l I). M. Lip^htres, who carried 
on a potato farm of twenty-two acres in 
Chcstcilicld this summer. They did all 
I to- work on HillcreM farm themseUe*. 

except during the digging seasoo. They 
h» vi stored their crop of twenty-four 
hundred bushels in bins, .-oust rnci.-d 
according to government plans in antici- 
pation of a fhta in prices. "Sid" says 
that Chesterlield was very pleasant hut 
there was a lot of work. 



you do not find the information desired, 
in a large proportion of eases it can be 
unearthed if only you make your 
wants known. There are many in- 
dexes, reference books and other tools 
familiar to librarians that may be used 
in finding fads which seem almost 
inaccessible. » 

Do not hesitate to ask. 



A. V. O. A. VISITS CAMPUS 
The American Vegetable Growers A>- 
soeiation of America visited the campus 
last week, motoring up from the Impo- 
sition at .Spriuifiield. A lour of the 
cam]. us department was made includinir 
a visit to the Hay Road fruit farm, fol- 
lowed by a banquet held in Draper Hall. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 



NEW WEATHER MAN 
The meteorological department is 
BOW under charge of Harold B. Millard 
THofttreat Barriugton. From now on 

he is the man to blame foi the poor 
weather on future week ends. 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



A WORD TO FRESHMEN AND 
OTHERS 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 

PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

Eu ropea n flan 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co, 

ind \ "gnesi.. BuiWm and fit*- Coverings t*l|* 



The Northwestern 
tual Life Insurance Co. 



The lirsi duty and the greatest pieas- 
„,v ol the library workers is to help 
people timl what they want. Not itt- 
[requentlj readers with a qttSStfoti lu 
ask apologize t«» the assistant for 'dis- 
liirbinu' her. They need not; she is 
Hi, re to answer questions, and la eager 
lo siid in <'vei> po^ibie way. Of eottrse 
much work besides waitinu on the pub- 
lie must be done in the reference and 
other departments, but it is always sec- 
ondary to readers" needs. 

Because you see an assistant busy at 
her desk, do not think she miiM not be 

Interrupted, of will not be ulad to htlp 

yon. 

Above all, do not no away uusalislied. 
Th* catalogue Will be helpful to those 
who prefer to serve themselves. But if 



for information write to 

ELLIOTT HENDERSON, Special Agent 

79 M>ik StM 'i. 
Boston, 



M. A. C. AND WAR SERVICE 

Cooperation with Massachusetts Com- 
mittee on Public Safety. 

On March 1, a month before Hie state 
Of war was declared, President Butter- 
lield. it the annual meeting of the 
Massachusetts Federation for Rural 
Progress, proposed that a committee be 
appointed which night «erve with the 
Stale Committee on Public Safety as a 
subcommittee on food production and 
conservation. President Bultcrlield was 
appointed chairman of this committee, 
and the state public safety committee 
made the group one of its sub-com- 
mittee-, 

By April 1 this committee on food 
production and conservation had become 
well organized, and the demand for as- 
sistance which the college could best ren- 
der, began. Karly in April, therefore, 
the college commenced turning meui- 
bersof the faculty over to the food com- 
mittee for administrative work at the 
committee headquarters and for advis- 
ory work in different parts of the state. 



Mush. 



DRAPER LUNCH 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Hut Go. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



Northampton, Mass. 



BfawasicBO \*& 



£52*- EMPIRE Tuts"" 



The Celebrated 



AMHERST GARAGE CO., mc. 

Automobile ®upi»li«?f» 

KICKING IN ALL ITS mmANCHMS 



VULCANIZING 



Carpen-Ur 5t Morehouse, 
PRINTERS, 

._, Amhertt, Maai. 



Where all foods of the b 
quality are served at the 
minimum price 



No i. Cook 



WM. M. KIMBALL, Proprietor. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious- or he's a 
"dead one." 



Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 




that have pep. 



MERRITT CLARK & CO., $££$"*- 



• rthampton. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

I tench. Lincoln and Kingston St* , 
BOSTON, r\ASS. 



Only two blocks from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and easily reached from North Station 
liy Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail simps and businesH centre, 
mIm> to the theatres and places of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Da| 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Pnprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 




Cow 
Owners 

Expect More 

From a 

01 LAVAL 



-more cream 
•longer wear 
■better service 
-better value 



And They Get It 

A catalogue of the New De 
Laval machines will be gladly 
sent on request. 



THE DE LAVAL SB2ARAT0R COMPANY 



186 Bko a i>w a v 
N 1W YORK 



m\ 



.".( K, Madison Hi, 
CHICAGO 



With the appointment of the food 
administrator id' Massachusetts il'resi- 
deni Uultertield was appointed a mem- 
ber of the advisory committee of the 
food admininstratiir, and the ul'oup for- 
merly appointed !>>■ the lfas»e< busetta 
Federation of Rural Progress was asked 
to serve as an advisory committee on 
food production and conservation. 

March "i I here was held at the college 
a conference of several department 
heads to consider plans for special con- 
tributions which I Q9 college could make 
in the state campaiyn for food produc- 
tion and conservation. At that lime a 
campus committee on mobilization was 
appointed, consisting of Professors 

Hurd, Brooke, Loefcwood and Sears. 

The amount of work done by the 
faculty has depended on the demand 
made upon the stall by various agencies 
and 61 of the faculty members put in 
either full time or pari time in the ser- 
vice. 

Foul members of the stall" have Te- 
si<*ned to enter larger fields of service in 
agricultural work. In addition, nine 
members ot the faculty are now serving 
with the armed forces of the countrv 
and some live or six others are about to 
be added to this nitmbrr. 

A pril 3rd the faculty appointed a com- 
mittee to prepare resolutions on behalf 
of the faculty, pledging the support of 
the college to the state and nation in t he 
present crisis. 

April Oili a canvass was made oi all 
members ol the faculty to ascertain 
what special contribution they eoubl 
make individually to the campaign for 
agricultural mobilisation. Practically 
every member of the faculty was as- 
signed to a committee liuvinu some 
Specific work for the summer dealing 
with the problem of food production, 
conservation and distribution. Mem- 
bers of the faculty having three mom lis 
vacation volunteered to yive as much of 
their vacation as mieht be required for 
this work. 

The President is also participating la 
the war work of the New England Fed 
era! ion for Kural Progress; is a member 
of the War Council of the International 
V. M. C A. and has been appointed to 
the Committee on Education ol the Ad- 
visory Com miction of the Council of 

Nat loiiai lieiense. 

When the state of war wan declared, 
the Faculty agreed that it would be ad- 
visable tor the ei d lege work to be con- 
ducted, for the time being at least, with 
as little interruption SB p o ssi ble, They 
made it possible, however, for seniors 
desiring to enter the military or naval 
service, of to enlist in agricultural ser- 
vice for the balance at the college rear, 

to be excused from that part of their 
work which would thus be omitted. As 
a icsiilt of I his action, about aC seniors 
were released during the early part id 
April, principally for supervision work 
in connection with agricultural projects 
Additional drill was Feqntred of the 
three lower classes and additional 
courses in the theory of military science 
were offered as elective* for seniors. 
On April 20th the faculty voted lo allow 
any student to leave college M the 
same conditions ibal bad been made to 
seniors. 

At the close of of the week ending 
M»y 'iflth. W7 per cent of the students 
had entered some form of emergency 
service and there were left in college 
twenty-four students, live of whom were 
negotiating for positions outside. Four 
hundred and seventy regular students 
had left, and the distribution of post* 
ti.rns follows: 84.98% in agriculture, 
t0.f% in military service and 4.5H% In 
miscellaneous work. 



FRESHMEN 



Start your college year right, liny your 
clothes and haberdashery where you can 
buy it to the best advantage — where you can 
find the largest variety and best merchan- 
dise made in the best styles at fair prices. 



Sheepskin Lined Coats, 
Sheepskin Lined I' Islets, 
Snappy Top foals. 
Reversible Collared Shirts, 



$6.50 to $10 

$13 to $24 

$12 to $30 

$1.50 to $5 



Suits in Every Style and Price 

Guyer Hats 

Manhattan Shirts 

Altaian Cravats 

Oakes Sweaters 

Interwoven and Holeproof Sox 




i' 



Ouk j rULl Hart Bchaff n«r t Man 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Heart ftaoia*iifrra*>r ** Mara eioti»«>aa 



School and College photographers .. . 




LOCALLY: 5» Center St., Northampton Mass., 

and Sooth Hadley, 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



I Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

^Vrttss t**<it*y fi»s- f»rio«9» oss 

\ E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1857 S 



Fsraser*' Standard f»r $i*t> Year. 1917 



Ask For Oir Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents In Unoccupied Territory 

«> 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Sulmtdtarf rfftl Aiwrlean Agrl«;ultnrBl CUSUllusI « <>. 

II CHAMBERS STREET - • - (JEW YORK CITY 



sssBSBBAasaaesaaMS 






m> 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1917. 









ALUMNI NOTES 

X">. — ( >ne ill a scries of attractive pub- 
lir;ii ions, gotten out by (lie Litchlicld 
< ciuuly Cuivei'sity dull, ban just been 
published by them. It is called "Rural 
Life in Litchlicld." and was written by 
Charles Hhepherd Phelps, ol the elass 
of \hh:>. 

'08. — William K, Sawyer was sum- 
moned under the selective draft and as- 
signed to t he 1st Company of Military 
Police, ftl Ayer. At the time of being 
drafted Sawyer wan captain of the 
Home Guard Company at Sterling and 
W. O. Taft '06, whh first lieutenant. 

'06, — The October numberof I'urk and 
Cemetery printed at Chicago has an ex- 
tended article by Arthur H. Sharp, 
landscape engineer, entitled "Coopera- 
tion of Cemetery and Monument Deal- 
ers." Mr, Sharp has been specializing 
for some years in cemetery construction. 

(Mb -Myron W. Thompson was mar- 
ried October 17, to Miss Helen Low in 
Denver, Colorado. 

'00. — In the September number <>t 
The Amrrirait till/, Mr. Theodore .1 . 
Morcau has a tine illustrated article 
entitiled "A Comprehensive Resort 
Town Site Plan." This plan is drawn by 
the American I'ark builders of which 
tirm Mr. Moreau is secretary. 

ex-Tl.— Harold H. Howe has enlisted 
iulhe2~>th Regiment of Kngineers and 
has been sent to Cam]) Devens, at Ayer. 

12.— Prof. Henry B. Francis, If. A.C. 
li, now of the Xew York State College 
of Forestry at Syracuse, will preside 
Wednesday, Oct. 24, at one of the mee t - 
lag of the Thirteenth Annual Conven- 
tion American Civic Association at 
Planter's Hotel, St. Louie, Mo. 

T2. — R. T. Reers is at IMallsbiirg 
training for the Officers' Reserve Corps. 
He is a member of Company No. |, 

'15.— "The Plant Food Materials in 
the Leave* of Forest Trees'" is the title 
ot an article recently written by Paul 
Netex, .It., of the M. \. C. chemistry 
department. 

'15.— "F.rnie" It. Parmcnler has, we 
believe, the largest family in his elans, 
lor on Oct. 1*, he became I he proud 
father of two C>h lit. laiys. 

':•:. Beta* : w. !'.ad#e?sT«--wiih !"' •• 
Engineers. His special work is map 
making. 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Pudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



CIGARS 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 



CARS 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercol Athletic 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 



STATE NURSERY PLACE OF 
INTEREST FOR NATURE LOVER 

Perhaps I tie most beautiful and sys- 
tematic. >et the most unknown, spot m 
the campus Is the state nursery, below 
tbe poultry yards. Here may be found 
thousands of the various varieties of 
pine, ill set out in symmetrical plots, 
and attended to with the utmost care. 
The liny seedling* an- propagated 
under cover, and after various trim- 
mings and transplanting* are distrib- 
uted over the state, A visit to this 
section of the campus will well reward 
the effort, for it brings forth an almost 
unknown phase of the work the college 
is doing. 

WAX TREAD THURSDAY 

In preparation for the coming in- 
formal next Saturday, the committee 
announces that a wax trend will be 
held in the Drill Hall Thursday evening 
at 7-fl<> p. M. The college orchestra will 
be on hand to practice a few harmoni- 
ous selections, and plenty of opportun- 
ity will he liven for lite light and fan- 
tastic Inclined to remove the splinters 
(mm the floor and till the h«des with 
wax. Everybody out and bring your 
favorite co-ed along. 



4 i<!i».»«*ii ,%.>•■> 



WV • ** * 4 » ' • • » 



Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index. 

M, A. C. Christian Association, 

M . A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stock bridge Club. 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



Telephone 

C. A. Peters, .Secretary — 4."i4-W 

H. M. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403- AI 

H. K. Bobbins, Manager— res. 62- W 

L. T. Uuckman, President — 416 

i a Chapman ft&naget: — kmii 

B. I), Hawley, Alanager — 8314 

O. S. Flint,*Manager— 544-M 

VV. S. Sawyer, Manager — 548 

L. N. Odams, Manager — 203- AI 

S. K. Tuthill, President— 416 

A. F. Williams, Alanager— 8364 

I). M, Lipahires, Manager— 416 

K. L. Alessenger, Alanager— SI 1 7 

K. M. Bufftim, Manager— 8364 

I). O. Merrill. President— 4 1 6 

3, H. Dav, President— 8377 

H. L. Russell ,* President— 11 9-R 

W. Hurlburt, President— 424-Ai 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 7-20, 8.10, 
9 10, 10-20, and at 20 minutes past the 
hour until 11-20 P. M. 



CARS 



ENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The Rexall Store 



Drugs 
Sodas 

Cigars 
Candy 



Amherst, 



Leave Amherst for M. A.C. at 605 625. 
7-00,7-30,800,8-15,9.15,930, 10 15, 1030. 

11*15, n-30, ra-30, 12-45. '\3°' ''45 a "d at 
45 minutes past the hour up to 9-45, anu 
at 10-30 and ri 00 p. m. 
Last car at 12 30 A. M. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rate.* 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

80 M Ilea of Trackage Hodern 
Equipment -Train Dispatch- 
ing Sy stem Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Company 



AMHtRST & SUNDERLAND ST. fit CO 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Gents' Kurtilslilhiis Ticket System 

If AMITY ilRfET 

Amherst 

CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 


io-i5e 


Collars, 


S 1-lC 


Cuffs, - 


a i-ic 


Plain wash, 


48c per doc. 


Same, rough dry, 


- 30c per dot. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 Suits for % 1.00 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

AH bills payable at Co-op. Store and parcel* 
left there will receive prompt at tendon . 

GraysoM '17, Agent 

Hiubihbotbam '17. Ami. Atent 






917 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 30, 1917. 



No. 3 



SEVENTY-THREE FRESHMEN 
PLEDGED TO FRATERNITIES 

Practically Seventy Per Gent of the 

Entire Glass. Next Pledge Day 

in Winter Term. 

Seventy-three freshmen pledged to 
fraternities in Chapel, Monday noon, 
bringing to a close one ol the keenest 
i m- ii i n u Reasons in yearn. Last year 
eighty-seven men put on buttons at the 
first pledge date which was f>H percent 
of the entering class pledged on the iirst 
date. No further pledging can he done 
until the third Monday of the winter 
term. The list of pledges for the pres- 
ent season, arranged according to the 
date the fraternities were founded, are 
as follows : 

O. T. V. 

Ceorge W. Kdnian, Orange 

Herbert L. Qaer . Totes Kivera 

Hubert M. Hodgson, New Port, R. I. 

Charles I), Kendall, Worcester 

Lawrence F. Pratt, North Weymouth 

fill SIliM \ K U'I'A 

Viuglin \lbti, Arlington 

I'aul li. Uiuwii, Hrocktuu 

Willard Uowen. Nitick 

Paul M. Reed, Baldwiuville 

Boberl I.. Starkcy, Filehburg 
Onrllle II. .spencer. New Haven, Conn. 

Ceorge.L Thyherg, .Springfield 

Wallace L. Whittle, Weymouth 

.liistin Met art hy. Arlington 

Julius Kroek. Brooklyn, S*. V, 

KAPPA RlflM A. 

"•.I. I I •■ . '. •••• r. Pt «'..».;.» 

James W. Alger, Heading 

Donald II. look. Had ley 

Frederick Cha.in.cll, Winthrop 

Carroll B, French, Lynn 

Francis K. Reynolds, lladley 
Kalph MacCortuack, West .Sotnerville 

Henry I.. Rice, Momerville 

KAl'I'A OAMM \ fill. 

Uuj Clifford, Amesbiiry 

Lloyd C. Fogg, Topsiield 

Walter K. Milling! Msyuard 

Charles W. Piatt, Newton, Coon. 

Kverett C. PWSftffl, Dorchester 

Harry S. Stiles, Lynn 

Salten F. Calhoun, Brookllne 
TRKTA 'III. 



Roland W. Day. 
Kelvin M. Ilall.-i i 
Albert .Jacobs. 
True man Kyle, 



M.diietd 

Hock land 

Wrentham 

Providence, H. I, 



tJeorge K. I^ickwood, 
Kalph I^ftTlit 
Walter Palmer, 
Raymond B. Richardson. 
Cecil Landy, 
Ralph 8. Stevens, 
< .union lCi.-i-. 
Charles Vinton 



Hyde I'ark 

Melrose 

Amherst 

Brook II tie 

Worcester 

Arlington 

.lama, i a Plain 

Boston 



SIGMA Till Kl'SII.ON. 

Roger C, Coombs, Peabody 

Peter J, Casein, Willititiiantic, Conn. 

John Bastings, LaBgns 

IContlauad on pSfSlj 



INTERCLASS FOOTBALL TO 
COMMENCE ON SATURDAY 



Seniors vs. Sophomores ; Juniors ve 

Freshmen. First Oame Called 

for 2-25 P. M. Lineups. 

Good football is in order for the inter- 
class games Saturday afternoon, Nov. 
3, when the seniors' and sophomores 
clash, and juniors will play the fresh- 
men. Although practice has been more 
or less irregular because of the stiff 
srhcdules in vogue, there will be enough 
pep in the scraps to make up for the 
lack of skill. This is the Iirst year that 

| series of inteii-lass football has l> 

played so there are likely to be some 
surprises among the new material. Of 
last year's varsity very few men are left. 
Hiihatdsoii and Goodwin of the varsity 
will strengthen the '1* line while 
Ulanebard and Whittle should star for 
the juniors. 

Lineups for Saturda\ 
1P1H 1H20 

Sawyer. Kayiuond, I.- re, Lot DID]) 

Cotton, It it, Sullivan 

Boyd, Ig rg, Crafts 

llance , e c. Bunker 

Tilton, rg ig, Headio 

K«les, Carter, rt It, Muleod 

Hichardson, re le, Carlton 

Hunnewell, qb qb, Sweeney 

I'hapman. Bahbi'l. Ihh rhh. .lakeman 
Lipshires, rhb lhh. Ball 

i.oo.lw iii. fb fh, Cande 



1918 

Ruwe, I'nderwiMid.le 
Ross, It 

Uiaviii Bagg, ig 
Bond, c 

Wood, m 

liiaix'hard. rt 
Callatiaii, Mansell. re 
Whittle i|l> 
IN-tersoii , liib 
Williams, Tlil. 
Faxon, While, fh 



WW 

re. Cascio 

rt, Rice 

rg, lirigbam 

r, Mackintosh 

Ig. Sandy 

It , Ames 

le. Whittle 

qb, A ndarson 

rhb, Lei oia mI 

Ihb, Miller 

fb, Met orinack 



SENIOR CAMOUFLAGE 

The senior class, that it might lie the 
more distinguished, have voted in class 
meeting assembled, that from Del. 27 
until the Thanksgiving holiday all 
members -hall permit as much of a 
growth as possililc to form over the 
upper lip. In short, moustaches are to 
lie in order * hene vei possible. Those 
meiniiers who have not the ability to 
support any additional weight on the 
upper lip will be obliged to wtar port- 
able moustaches at all claSS fll net ions. 
An amendment to have these of a red 
hue was defeated when put to vote. 
This new scheme is merely on trial, If 
it is found that t here are really a few 
men in the class who can do a good job, 
this may become a custom taking the 
place of senior caues. No mention was 
made about the co-ed members getting 
portable copies but as it was agreed 
that all members live up to the motion, 
this was felt unnecessary. The future 
has much in store for many of the class. 



UPPER CLASSES VOTE TO 
TRY SYSTEM OF COVENTRY 



Attempt to Impress on Entering ("lass 

Seriousness of Pond Parties. 

Ostracised for 24 Hours. 

From now on. pond parties at Aggie 
will take on an entirely different aspect 
than they have in the past. Instead of 
being a joke, as freshmen have come to 
consider It, to be thrown into the pond 
it is now to be a disgrace good and 
proper. At Wednesday Assembly last 
week the student body voted to place 
the freshmen who were eligible lor the 
pond under a system of Coventry. For 
twelve hours before and twelve Imiirs 
after the pond party, no student ill the 
college will speak to any of the fresh- 
men who are under the ban. Such 
freshmen will be designated by wearing 
either a while bat or a white band on 
their arm, and it is the duty of every 
man in college not to speak to one of 
these freshmen. The Iirst poml parly 
will tike place Wednesday , Oct . 31, at 
noon. 



PROF. MACHMER GOES TO 
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 



THETA CHI SERVICE FLAG 

The! a Chi has set the pace hi the ser- 
vice th't rcsli. The new emblem flying 
from their flagstaff honors fourteen men 
who are now in tbe world war. These 
v*eie members of the classes In college 
at the time war was declared, or the 
classes of 17, '\H, Tt», and '20. No ex- 
members of t hese classes arc considered. 
Following are those whose names are 
represented by stars ol the flag: N'lne- 
teeii-seveiilcen Sbiimway, aviation; 
Higgiuboi ham. at Ayer; Irving, second 
lieutenant, at Ayer; Fisher, tlrsl. ser- 
geant, at Ayer, Niueleen-eigbteen — 
Bradley, aviation; Burtch, at Ayer; 
Sea\e\, third elasn pharmacist male: 
Patch, hospital apprentice at Newport. 
Nineteen-iiineteeu .smith, iu medical 
corps: Harvey, coriMiral at Ayer. Nine- 
teen-! weuty Ware, in marines; Mur- 
ray, at West held; Burnett, hospital 
unit : Blehiirdaon, at Ayer, 



ADDRESS MAJOR STUDENTS 

Ilr. i an. e addressed the major students 
in Agricultural F.cotiomlepi last Wednes- 
day evening, outlining the courses 
offered, and opportunities for men ma- 
joring under him. 

In speaking of the opportunities of 
Agricultural Kconomics as a major, be 
gave a few Instances of M. A, C. gradu- 
ates who have done well In this subject. 
Reed '14, Lindi|ulst '16, Blanpied IU, 
Lincoln 'Ki, and West man '17 are all in 
t he federal service and are making good. 

Damon TO, extension professor in Ag- 
ricultural Kconomics, spoke of what tbe 
government is doing and of the diffi- 
culty of obtaining trained men along 
this line. 

The Agricultural Kconomics Club 
meetings are to be continued on Wed- 
nesday evenings at 0-80, I*. M. 



To Have Charge of Marketing Farm 
Products in Western Massa- 
chusetts. Leaves Nov. 1. 

Under the supervision of K. Faiiiihaiu 
Damon, extension professor of aijiieul. 
inial economies at (lie Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, a new and prom- 
ising program tor the marketing of farm 

products throughout 'he slate Is lloW 

being undertaken, The four western 
counties ol the slate arc to compose one 
district and Prof, W L. Maehiner. of 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, bas 

been engaged to take charge of the 

work in this district. His headquarters 

are to be ill the office of the Hampsbiie 
County Farm Bureau at Noil hauipton. 

Mr. Maehiner has bad several veafl 
of tarni experience, and since his con- 
nection with the Agricultural College 
he bas made carelul studies ot the 
onion, tobacco ami milk industries. 
Presumably there is no man in the ton 
necticut Valley who is more familiar 
with the methods of marketing am) dis- 
tribution of lh«* noioii croji. Me Is joint 
author of the bulletin recently issued 
by the Massachusetts Kxpcrimeiit Ma 
Hon entitled t ouuecticut Valley Union 
.Supply and distribution. Recently Mi 
Maehiner loot been engaged in the in- 
vestigation oi tbe rusi of distribution III 
milk in Boston and vicinity, w bleb It 
being conducted by the attorney-gen 
era! of the Commonwealth in coopera- 
tion wttb the Department of Auricul 
lural Kconomics of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural t'ollege. He has also I 
very accurate knowledge of the farm 
cr»" market, being familiar with tin 
Operat'on of those in Lancaster. I'enn. 
He will take up his duties N'ovembei 
first. 

For i he past six years, I'rot. Machim i 
has been connected with the mat Itetnal 
,vn department of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Collage. During this pi i 
od he lias become quite a favorite with 
all those who have come -u contact with 
him, but b from a professional ami social 
standpoint. His patient and forbearing 
manner in the classroom has made 
many a freshman's stormy path seem 
easier. He has been adviser to the 
freshman class for the last three sen 
His departure will not only be a loss to 
the faculty, but the whole college will 
miss one of its best friends. 

Four offices have been established in 
the state, the primary purpose of which 
is to aid In the economical marketing ul 
farm products. The mean* by which 
this is to- be accomplished are vanou*. 
including a market news service, in 
which tbe Federal Bureau of Markets 
will cooperate; instruction as to the 
value of farmers* exchanges; asstsMim ■ 
In the establishment of Storages and 
warehouses; aid to public ami farmers 
markets; instruction as to i be lesirn- 
bility of consumers* clubs; the eelab- 



il 



J 



I 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



lishnuMit nf relations wiili middleman; 
the development <>l transportation facil- 
ities; and llie standardization of grades 
ami pack ages • 

In the establishment anil maintenance 
of the attest, the stales Relations Ser- 
vice of the United Stated Department of 
Agriculture 1h cooperating with the Food 
Administration of the state. The offi- 
cials in charge «f these otlices are to lie 
known as district demonstration agents. 
and are ranked as assistant county 
agents at large. For the purpose of 
this work the state has been divided 
into four districts, one to include the 
northeastern counties, another the 
southeastern counties, Worcester county 
comprises a third, and the four western 
counties the fourth district. 

To carry on the work in the north- 
eaBtem district of the state Professor 
Damon has secured Mr. Elliott C. Hol- 
ers, who has headquarters at the Essex 
Connt> Agricultural school 'and has 
been at work since October lirst. 

Mr. Robert \V. Merrick, manager of 
the QtltBcy public market, without 
doubt the most successful market in 
the slate, has been appointed to the 
southeastern district. 

No appointment has yet been made to 

the Worcester County position, although 

it is expected that the work in that dis- 
trict will soon be begun. 

The support for this work is contrib- 
uted jointly by the Federal States Kela- 
tions Service and the Stale Food Ad- 
ministration; and while the term of the 
appointments is to terminate .luueBO, 
1!<1H, it is the hope of those in charge of 
the work that it may, at the expiration 
ot this term, he placed upon a permanent 
basis. 

MUSICAL CLUBS BEGIN WORK 

Loss of Leaders Keenly Felt. No 
Christmas Trips 
Handicapped by the lack of old ma- 
terial, the musical clubs begin this 
week to remodel the personnel of the 
clubs Into a working organissat ion. The 
loss «>f the three leaders of the various 
dubs. Worth ley TH of the glee club, 
W. N. Thompson 'IS of the mandolin 
club ami T. 11. Mitchell 18 of the or- 
chestra, has b een the most serious. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Kditor's note: In Ibis column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
front. J 

l'lattsburg, N. V. 

<»ct. 21, l'.MT. 



Our work is very Interesting but very 
hard. Not much like Aggie drill. This 
last week has been spent in the trenches 
under simulated war conditions. Until 
Thursday we came home every night, 
having dinner only in the field ; Thurs- 
day night we spent in the trenches. As 
I was in charge of a section (French unit 
in the company) and had to assist in 
posting sentinels on relief, I got no sleep 
at all. Unfortunately, the next day I 
was non-com. in charge of quarters and 
had to stay up while the bunch got in 
some beauty sleep. ThiB week we go 
on the range again and should have a 
comparatively easy lime of it which 
should help some. 

As regards the Aggie men here this is 
the bunch I'm sure of, but not of their 
class in every case: time 'If, llasey '13, 
(lark T:i, French *lt, Brown T4. Tower 
'14, Wheeler '14, Lodge ex T4. F. H. 
Hills 14. Lewis (Jake) T5, Montague 
T5, Potter "1U. Dudley ex-'ll, Desmond 
e\-17, Worthley Ttf, MaeOinnis '18, 
Monohan Mh, Squires '17, Thayer ex-' 14, 
Spauldiug 'IS, 1 guess that is about all. 
(ii UU.M Htr.vriNoTON 'KS. 



IF you want to buy a bed, or sell that old macki- 
naw, or get rid of some books, or let somebody 
know you sell theme paper, etc., etc., etc., there are 
two alternatives: Either take a chance or reach 
every student through " The Coi.i.eciian." 



Stet> Co.. tini Bat,, D*pot Biwiam, 
(AMI 1 Dxveks, 
Av KB, M U».„ 0<r. 20, HOT. 



THK rates are toe a line an issue, address 
included. No advertisements for less than 
three lines. Diop your order in the mail box in 
"The Coi.ik<;i,\n" office or see the advertising 
manager. 



The individual work of Worthley will 
certainly be missed, 

Richardson * 18 of the mandolin club 
and Kofi Tn for the glee club seem to 
be the logical choice for leaders, while 
Johnson *1» will probably lead the col- 
lege orchestra. 

However, the elnbs have been very 
fortunate In one respeet, In that Prof. 
W, 1\ Bigelow of Amherst has con- 
Meted to tgnia coach the glee club. 
Under his guidance they should at 
least approach the excellency of former 
glee clubs. The mandolin club is to 
have a new coach and the management 
Is now negotiating with several candi* 
dates. A definite choice will be made 
this week. 

Due to the short Christmas vacation, 
and also the fact that it is the only va- 
cation of the year, all plans for ex- 
tended trips wll' have to be abandoned. 
However, there will he a great many 
short trips which will afford tbe men 
much enjoyment. Already trips to 
lladtey, Holyoke and Springfield have 
been arranged. In addition (here will 
be numerous Red Cross BOMtfhi as well 
art trips to some of the nearby towns 
and cities, including PIttsfleld.Cbloopee, 
Northampton, Hartford, Worcester and 
North Adams. The management is try- 
ing to arrange for a series of concerts 
at the various war cantonments In the 
state, including Camp Harriett, ('.imp 
Deveiis and the camp at Newport, H. I. 



1 have been here just I wo weeks ami 
like very much. There are many Aggie 
men up here. I have met Al Tophara 
'lri, who is in the same company that I 
am, (.come Howe ex T*. Hud Fisher 
*17, Jim Warren T7, («•<> Grayson *IX. 
Thompson T8, Walker Td, Walkden TO, 
(Nasser *18. (iilmore TO, 'Put hill T7, 
Clark '14, Fellows '18, Moore '19, Hun- 
toon 18, Chambers TH, Webster '17. 
Qui III by T», Richardson '17, K. H. New- 
ton '19, Norcioss '18. 1 have seen tbe 
following officers, some of whom smiled 
pleasantly, but others don't know me 
at all: Capt. Weeks 1*, Lieutenants 
Powell '18, Savllle '17, (Klaras'18, Samp- 
son 18, Hagelsteiu '17. To make the 
Aggie atmosphere more complete we 
have with us l.ieul. Smart, formerly 
Sergt. Smart, and Sixsmith, who gave a 
series of boxing lessons in Amherst last 
winter. 

our officers, all PlaUsburg men, are 
splendid. Tbe captain, Kobert P. 
Huldswurtb of Michigan Agricultural 
*18, is admired by all the men. He was 
a classmate of Dr. Itano, and Is ac- 
quainted with Prexy, Treas. Kenney 
and Dr. Marshall. 

Camp Devens is a young city having 
an area of 10,000 acres and contains, at 
present, about Sfi.tKX) inhabitants from 
New Kngland and New York. The non- 
commissioned officers, who are helping 
in the drilling, are tegular army men 
from the Southern states. 

We arise about 5-80 A. M. and have 
reveille at M0. Mess is held at 6-15. 
Then nothing to do until 7-00 o'clock, 
except make our beds and polish up 
around the barracks, picking up papers, 
cigarette butts, and ot her debris which 
mar the landscape, The first few days 
we bad to pull stumps, but we worked 
ourselves out of a job by pulling up or 
burning all tbe stumps. 

A little after 7-00 we start on our reg- 
ular job. The first hour is spent in 
selling up exercises, which we all en- 
joy, for that Is the only method we have 



THE DAVENPORT 

The unsurpassed eaiing house for "Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 

t ffT i*: r ftniilflilli I'TflfF ♦**<* *^1 — — 

Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



tst. 



H. L. Kl SHELL. MST.. '1« 
K M. BWKFrM. *l» 



K. II. COLLINS. '«» 
V. g < OLE, tSI 




M. A. C. 

Basement of North Dormitory 

Undergraduates ourselves, we know what 

graduates want 

SPECIAL SALE FOR ONE WEEK 
Columbia Scratch Pads, 8 1-2 in. by 5 in., - - 4 cents, 3 to* 10c 

LooK over the new College Stall, 90 cents 



FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

drown by the Flortcultural Dent. 

We offer our nurplUB stock of out flow- 
ers anil plants al reasonable rates to 
students and faculty. This stock is 
grown In modern houses under ideal 
conditions, Roses, carnations, violets, 
chrysanthemums and sweet peas in 
season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 



The "Nonotuck* 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 
FIREPROOF ItftOHAH 



RATES, $1,50 m U1 AM OP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Proms— Our Specialty. 



P. J. BEHAN 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



of getting warm in the morning. Arti- 
ficial heal is about as rare here as i)."»s 
in Sid Haskell's autonomy finals. 

After warminir up we pitch into our 
regular joh, drilling. We drill,- with 
I i'i-i jiu-nt rests, until 11 -Hi I. and then no 
work until we tackle the beef stew at 
mess, 12-00 m. Afternoon drill starts at 
12-60 and continues until 4-HO. We 
have to be present at retreat, &• 80, and 
ilicu we arc off until taps, 10-00 o'. duck, 
Kvening mess conies at 5-80, 

The art of camouflage ,s pi act iced 
here, consisting of rt&mbtity steak 
about six limes a week. 

We usually spend our evenings at the 
V. M. C. A. There are 111 buildings in 
camp ami they arc certainly doing 
splendid work. (everything is free, 
writing paper ami envelopes, movies 

and various entertainments, They 
also furnish baseballs, footballs, and 
basket balls. The V. M. <\ A. certainly 
helps to break up the monotony of 
camp life, and saves many men from 
squandering their limeaud money in 
gambling or going down to Aver ami 
getting tangled up in wine, women and 
song. 

Our drill thus far has consisted of 
squad movements and bayonet practice. 

We are allowed no cuts, lull some- 
limes attend football games in the 
afternoon. We are granted I lease .it 
absence e\ei\ other week, from noon 
Saturday until taps Miuday night. I 
live near enough lo ihc camp to gef 
home by automobile in an hour, 

Taken nil in all, if the bejfi come 
Lack alter going "hut then- " it will be 
the best thing that could nave hap 
pened to them. 

Yours in M. \. I',, 

FH \nk .1. UlKK* 1*. 



304tii I'. S, I m wi in , 

I Oil' |)KV I \-. 

\vKit. Mas- <m i. ii, i«.M7. 

1 have been pretty busy since I struck 
this camp and haven't done very much 
corresponding . but this Sttndaj morn- 
ing 1 liHve but little to do so I am tak- 
ing a turn at writing letters. 

There are a bnnefa of Aggie men 
»i altered Ttrou no ovci tbe eSStonraeut 
here and we are going to E«l as iii.ui> 
as we can of them together here on 
some week-end during the middle of 
next month and go tip to p.iv jfofl peo- 
ple a visit, and look the old place o\ei 
again. 

We are working pretty well on nched 



S. S. HYDE 

Jowol.T ft 114 I « » | M i««l« • I , 

la rintimiil Htreel 

lh'tltlai*' rre»< nptii.ti* t'llt*'<t, Hitikeii LcMMI 
A<-rurat*l> Replaced. Unr Wfttrh Kt"l*tr- 

Ittif I'riimitHs ion! Hkllfnllv (Mine. 

naiisfaeiinn fi nsra fi Trnfl 

COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Wslk iIiiwii town »n«i fiesta as .mix ■* t»»- - 
Here ln«lii'ie pasted tin ISAM BMH SSI m«k«, 

< lood Service and Reasonable Prices 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main Street, Ifasonif Building. 

Northampton, Mass. 



Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

C/osci only \ from 1 A. M- t* / ' M, 



ule now so we can tell very nearly 
where we stand most of the time; thete 
is something for every lieuieuaul iiml 
captain to do all of the time it he wants 
to do it ; of course, if he wants to shove 
some of it oil onto Homebody else he can 
do I fiat too. 

1 heard from Kloiiie Kuckman .1 while 
ago; uk you probably know, he is now 
out in Washington State setting the 
Pacific coast beauties' hearts in a whirl, 
I hear from Whit once in a while: he is 
down in Tennessee and Virginia most 
of the time, from all that 1 can discover, 
flirting with the Southern belles, and 
Impressing them with his importance. 
The rest of the crowd ,-.eem to have laid 
down and died somewhere, or perhaps 
they are JiMing from the draft. 

Uav In vi. no "17. 



Johnson Book Co, 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -:- 



Camp Kagle Pass. Tex.. 
Sd Infantry, Oct. 2, 1!H7. 



i spent 1*1 most gloiioiisi '.') weeks in 
Ft. I.eaveiiwoit h. Kans. It was about 
10 hours a day and if you know any- 
thing about Kansas weather and rag- 
weed you will have some sympathy for 
tbose of us who survived the fight. No 
union governed our hours. 

It will be impossible tor me to tell 
yon what we did in t hose few weeks ; 
it will be much easier to tell what we 
did not do, but, really, 1 don't think 
there was anything pertaining to the 
military that we did not take a crack at 
in some form, shape or manner. 

In my class there weie about iHH) 2d 
Lieut a. iiiilmling the men lloin Aggie. 
I'ppel ex-'17. Newton (special) Hatha- 
way, llemeiiway, and voiiis truly. We 
had 110 uet-togei hers as ii was impos- 
sible lo liml a lime when all could 
attend. Newton find ihc mi-.tottune to 
land under his horse when it tell and 
came out with a broken arm: llatba- 
wa> lias gone to Ft. Benjamin Harrison 
to the jrith Inf.: Ilemenwny to the B7th 
ill I.utedo, Tex., a few miles below me. 

He and I earns as far as San Intottki 

together. 

Before we left heaveuwoilh Mack, 
Williams and L'paot) '17 arrived in the 
new class ol provisionals. 

During the latlci pail ol August all 
of my class were promoted to 1st I.ieuts. 
to date back to the date of out first 
commission, .June ■*•. 

Al present I am attached lo < o H. as 
2d in command. I uiu*t ring oft as it is 
to he my duty to be outpost commander 
at the railway bridge over the Bin 
fit nude between Kagle itsM, Texas ami 
I'iedras Negras, Mexico. It will not be 
a very exciting job as everything is very 
peaceful In these parts, ii is my Hrst 
time on as I have mueh to learn. 

F, E. Uaskku. "10. 



i ... i 1 . s. m. 0, 

Paris Island 
Port lioyal, §■ C, 
Oct, II. I'.»17. 

tiur training days arc over and we are 
honest lo goodiiesH marines. The com- 
pany Is due to leave mnnetime between 
now and Tuesday toM^uan*. ieo, Virginia 
to train for a lew weeks more in trench 
digging and lighting. Then oft for 
Fiance 

l may not leave with the compauv. 
A Couple of nights ago the sergeant 
called me Into the orderly room and 
asked me to stay and train recruits. He 
said that I would only be hereabout six 
months more and then would go to 
Frame. I bad planned to go with the 
company but I haven't decided yet and 
ICootlnnfrd m p*c* 1 J 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner nf Itillman Mid Humes Streets, three 

blinks friun tin- I iiiixi I >>-|><>t . is .1 ili'in Ihw 

telry runon tlie Kni(i|>eiiii Plan. It is just a step 
friun Main Street, a way from the notoa and (hint, 
anil yet In the center of the btmlneHS district. 

Its Hon are well tin iiislifil and roiiifiutuHe. 
lin\lin. r a talopboBB and tint uml eold running 
water in e%er> ruiini. I'rldi $1 and up; rooms 
v, ith hat li minute) $1.50 and up 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dtti- 
iiiK room make* a meal | pleasant iiii'iimh 
e\ t" vthinu of the hicheitt i|iialily. well rooked 
and served in the best possible uiunuei 

MtSJ at the Highland Motel once and you will 
anticipate stuyiutf theie ai{ain. Music ever). 
ex eninif . 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel. Sprimtrteld. Hats. 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



Eats, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



Freshman Hats 



GOOD SERVICE 



Come to us tor 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Timer Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad lo see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

I7OR forty yean we hav resdsmd faithful wra. For forty 

* year* we have tried lo make each y***i »mkm mmw nearly 

ideal. Thi» untiring effort haa lanlt for u« sol only The WorW» 

LargeS Mail Order Seed Bummm, but .l« a World Wide 

reputation for Efficiency and undiiputed leaderthf>. The 

Fortirth Annivriwry Edition of Burpee* Annual, the 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" ■ brighter and 

better din ever. It m naUed free, A po^card will lmn« it 

W . ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower., 

Burpee Building. Philadelphia 



9 



(meVs Shoe Store 

Lar gest Stock — Lowell Prices 
Kaic|3s3a-»t l€*»f*ri I finis— H*?«t leather uaed 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS Il 6 

Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

PuhliRhed every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MAKSHA1XO. I.AM'HKAUMS.Edltor-in-CWef 
\\ KSI.KY ^. HAWYEK 'In. Athletic Editor 



Abhoi iatk Eiiitors. 

AKTHI R N- BOWKS "1M 

ELIOT M- lil'I'KI'M '19 

Urrill'l! I- rllAMH.KK 'ltt 

MYRTON F. EVANS *19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
K1KI4EKK. BOeKqi •IHT'ls, Business Manner 
SAMUEL It. KKIIKISH M». Asiiatant Manager 
i, ML. <'AM1'KKI.I.'20. Ad<rertUtngManager 
,|'a M KS < . M A l'l.KS '20. < ircalatlon 

<;. ALFRED SMITH '20. Circulation 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, B cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Blrger R. Rosequlat. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered aa leeond-rlasi matter at the Amheret 
Poet Office. 

Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Oct. 30. Mo. 3 



Shake and Regret. 
Another rushing season has come to 
:i close. Pom pel it ion has been very 
k,. ii. Some mud has been slung as in 
lormei scars. li is to be expected. 
Bui as a whole the game baa been 
p hived on the square. Any sore spots 
„hou1d quickly heal and the whole 
si mien) body gel back to the routine of 
college life. 

It is easy h.see, however, that rush ng 
season, even now. is far from perfect. 
The tlivee weeks time limit has worked 
fully as well as the fonr. Perhaps it 
will be l permanent thing. Here is a 
puiHi oi argument. The real weak 
,|„,i in the whole system, however, 
BOSna to Be in getting freshmen to shake 
before pledge day. Kushing season 
rules have been worked over for years. 
with the idea of making them as fair 
and square for the freshmen as possible. 



quiet, little knowing that in the near 
future it may prove to be the fatal step 
of his college life. 

These two instances, and many others 
that could be cited, are the conditions 
in the rushing season that make it hard. 
True, the rules say that no freshman is 
bound to any fraternity until the but- 
ton is put on in chapel. On the other 
hand, an entering man who has given 
his word feels in duty bound to keep it. 
He believes that it is as bind'ng as h'.s 
word would be in a business deal, in high 
school, in any phase of life from which 
he has come. He does not catch the 
spirit of this superficial thing, rushing 
season, which does not honor the word 
of a man. Though he may have 
looked other bunches over in later days 
and liked them far better, he feels 
obliged to go with the fraternity to 
whom he has given his promise. And 
thus he makes the fatal step at the 
beginning of his college life. Eor as a 
man pledges, so he becomes. 

It should not be so. The entire sys- 
tem of shaking should be abolished. 
A freshman should be given opportun- 
ity to look the bunches over, free- 
minded, until the season closes. Any 
group trying to get him to give his 
word before pledging day should suffer. 
The advantage of each fraternity could 
be set forth, but after « o'clock on the 
closing Sunday every freshman should 
feel free to sit down and weigh the case 
in band. After good serious thought 
be should make his own frank decision, 
unprejudiced, bound by word to no fra- 
ternity, influenced in no way by any- 
one on the campus. How much easier 
it would be for the freshmen if it were 
so. How much better for the whole 
system of rushing, for the fraternities, 
the college. It would he a square deal 
from start to finish. 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus new. and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will- will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Collegian, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 



Dr. L. O. Whitman Cox Sons & Vining 



9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p.m. Sunday ami 
other hours by appointment. 



Tiik system of Coventry, put into 
effect by the senate through the me- 
dium of the three upper classes, has a 
purpose. It is not done for a laughing 
matter, a joke. There is a real motive 
behind it all. Of late years freshmen 
have gradually been made to feel (and 



Croysdale Inn 

SOUTH HA1M.KY. MASS. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone 282S-W, Holyoke. 



72 Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all D egrees 
ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 




ami square lor i ne jit»u>»«=.. -» i~»" , n .u_„ 

V. i, works ..in. .,„„.- .heoppositwis- ^ ppcr cl M o m on «*-nu-*eio hl*m*_th*a 
in,, \„ entering student comes to anyone) that to be thrown in the p..nd 
eoibwe fresh from high school and the was an honor. They have been told 



mm. without any knowledge of frater- 
nities and I heir ideals. He looks good, 
and in the course of a few days he is 
extended a Wd to some fraternity. He 
Is given a smooth line of guff, is flat- 
,,,,,.«! and worked into an unnatural 
»iatc of mind. Then before he knows 
it a pledge lull ion has lieen forced on 



II U III till 1^11 1 I I'll *■ WVF* =y***» ■»»-_- =^ ^ ------- | — — - 

»,,„, and'he ha, shaken with that fra- college, the freshmen must beheld 



icimiN. Me should no! have done this 
m. early in the game, we all admit. Hut 
remember that the freshman comes 
here iiiuici|iiaiiited with the whole sys- 
tem of rushing. He knows no better. 
He cannot help it. 

In several other ways this same thing 
«„rks out. A man may be rushed by 
many fraternities, as many as three or 
four groups often visit his room in one 
night. '.shake with us. We are the 
l.esl bunch. Won't you shake f" That 
|« the cry ihat echoes in his earafter 
,ach bunch ha* tardily left him, At 
length he becomes so saturated with 
ibis shaking idea that he is in an un- 
natural stale of mind. He finds his 
studies slipping even though be would 
do his lies! to keep them up. He tries 
to siudy algebra and someone comes in 
with I lie watchword "Shake." Soon 
until midnight. At length in uttei des- 
peration he does shake with- the group 
who are so fortunate as to be with him 
w hen he can hear the situation no 
longer. He shakes to get peace and 



time and again that all big men In eol 
lege have been in pond parties. It is to 
be regretted that such a condition has 
prevailed. It has fostered freshness, 
dlsolwdience of senate rules, At last 
the time baa come when matters can go 
no further. This year, especially. 
ben so many upperdassmen are out of 

in 
restraint Something must be done to 
make them resize that they do not run 
campus life, much as they would like 
to. They must be made to feel that 
coming to Aggie is a serious proposition. 
They are here to work and boost, not 
loaf and foe!, 

To impress this upon the entering 
class. Coventry has been resorted to. 
No freshman ostracized is to be recog- 
nized for §4 hours. Supported by the 
entire student body, freshmen included, 
this scheme will do mneh to impress 
oa the men in question the seriousness 
of their offense, the disgrace of it 
Taken as a joke, laughed at, broken mp 
by the concerted action of any group, it 
will be a flat failure. It will be a Idol 
on the record of the student governing 
body. The student body holds the case 
in its own hands. Which shall if be.' 



Milford R, Lawrence "17, first class 
electrician, torpedo station I*. S, N. 
spent part of his*'leave" on ihe campus 
last Sunday. 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



STOCK JUDGERS PLACE 

SEVENTH IN THE WEST 

Last week the stock judging team. 
composed of Bruce, Hurlburt and 
Uosequist, took part in the live stock 
judging contest for colleges at the In- 
ternational Dairy Show at t'oliimlms, 
Ohio. In spite of their being handi- 
capped by an entire absence of practice 
this fall, due lo l he late opening of col- 
lege, the Aggie team look seventh 
place among the lit colleges, which 
l'rof. MeNutt considers a very sails 
factory showing. Bruce made i he best 
showing individually for M. A. ('., mak- 
ing his best show in judging Uueruseys, 
in which contest he was second. Two 
classes each of Jerseys, Guernseys. 
Holsteins and Ayrshires were judged, 
and the colleges placed in the following 
order: 

Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska. Mars land, 
Delaware, South Dakota, Massachu- 
setts. Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Kansas, 
New .Jersey, Ohio, Virginia. 

Last year, at Springfield, ihe M. A. ('. 
team placed liflh.aml considering the 
lad thai Ihe men did not have the 

usual preliminary practice at Brockton 

and other fairs Ihis year, ihe Animal 
Husbandry Department feels that the 
team did unusually well. 



MILITARY FRENCH COURSE 

Professor Mackimuiie's elssfl in con- 
versational and military French, which 
was outlined in chapel Monday, shows 
evidence of belofl very popular. The 
course, which ai present is for juniors 
and seniors only , is designed to uivt a 
working knowledge of conversational 
phrases and military terms for those 
who expect to see military sendee In 
the near future. Later, probably at the 
beginning of the next term, ■ course 
will be prepared for fr e sh men sod soph- 
oinores, 

Kigbly-wis uppei-elasHinen have sig- 
nified their Intention of joining the 
class. The majority of these are taking 
the course in conjunction with I lie elect- 
ive courses in military science. The 
class will be divided in two or more 
sections. It is Professor Maekimmie's 
Inten tion to lake charge of the class 
personal !> If possible, No outside study 
will be re«| ui red for the course and no 
college credit will be given under the 
present arrangement. 

LECTURES BY CHARTS 

A new view of the causes of the war 
was given by l'rof, George C, Wilson of 
Harvard university at last week's mm- 
lily. In the lecture, aided in charts, 
(he speaker pointed out I be basis of 
International relationship-land area and 
imputation. In tterinany I he popula- 
tion greatly exceeded ihe area and tbcj 
were obliged to become more and more 
efficient or expand. She must be effic- 
ient to support her army on her area 
but every peasant carries a soldier on 
his back. By means of scaled charts 
comparisons were made of the popula- 
tion, area, imports, exports, army and 
naval tonnage and personnel I. 

RECEPTION TO FRESHMEN 

In spite of the Informal and rainy 
weather nearly all the freshmen and 
unclassified students were present at 
the annual reception lo the row men at 
the President's House Saturday evening. 
President and Mrs. Butterlield were 
assisted in receiving by Dean Lewis, 
Professor and Mrs, Bobbins, Prof essor 
and Mrs. MnrKimmie and Mr, Kami. 
The ushers were l.'usse]], Lyons, Roberts, 
Bitter and Bnnnewell of the senior class, 
Refreshments were served bj ihcim 
classified women students. 



NEW SONG BOOK 

The second edition of the M. A.C. 
Sony Hooks will be placed on sale about 
about Nov. 2. The book will teal me 
three heretofore unpublished college 
songs by K. D. Origgs 'lH.oiieoi which Is 
designed as a college hymn; other M. 
A, C. contributors are F. A. Anderson 
Hi. Miss at, 1*. Ilolden 'Hi, W. W. 
Thayer IT and <\ T. Smith ' 1H. Wil- 
liam C, Laiigdon, who has been writing 
the M.A.C. Pageant, has also presented 
three songs, one of which is entitled 
*' llxiiiii to America." Songs represent i 
lug Amherst, Williams, Dartmouth, Cor- 
nell, Harvard. Vale and Ihe University] 

of Pennsylvania will also appear In ibis 

book. 

The book consists of INI pages and 
contains 72 sonys as follows: 17 origi- 
nal M.A. ('. songs, songs representing 

seven other colleges ami universities, 
11 patriotic Hongs and H7 songs most of 
which arc familiar la college men. 

The Song Book was compiled by 
Ralph •!. Walls "n7, and a copy may be 
obtained from tied 0. Kennew, freas- 
nrei ; ihe price is *l, b> mail $1.10, 



THE AIM 



Y. M. C. A. OFFICERS 

Theodore II, tteuraann "l* has been 

elected vice-president of (he Y . M.C. A., 
to fill ihe position tell vacant b\ Uohert 

L. Boyd, who is now president. The 
officers ami cabinet for ihis year arc as 
follows : 

Pr es id en t, Hobeii L. Boyd Wl mcc- 
president, Theodore II. Beumann *1X: 
secretary. Hall B. C'hrpenter MP; treas- 
urer. Stephen lllchaldsoll Mh. 

Raymond Park burst Mo t» chairman 
deputation work, other members of 

the cabinet ale MeHall P. liatchehler 
l!». Donald Moth '20 gad Philip New- 
ell "'20, The association hopes to com- 
mence Its weekly meetings vers soon. 
It is hoped that a definite announce- 
ment regarding the general secretary, 
to take Tom Cotton's place, can be 
made in a slmri time. 



After twenty-five years (lose business association with the best drcssi d 
men in your college : 

To keep our lines of young men's togs so utterly small and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're spec i.ilists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart '* trench" overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Goats, heal coal made, 
• Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



At the Young* Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's llloqk, .... Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



Protect Your College Obligations AMHE ^?IA H .9.lPl p .*!?i , l G m 

WITH AN INSURANCE POLICY 



Cost per year, $«.S4 per 1000 

Sciitl iih- ,in illtmtnUliMMif ,iImi\i' !•<•! i. \ 



V 



Mail .-..ui-on to W AI.IKI ll IIAKI.HW W, 
:*<l Nnltonal BaiiU KI1I12 , SselagftsM, Mum. 



SOPH TRACK ENTRIES 

Manager Douglas of ihe L9S0 ti:i<k 
team has entered the following Men for 
tni oujfl meet attai nt?' Mr: 

Mile run Lambert, Lyons, Jones, 
Simmon*. 

Two mill' run IJlamhiinl. L.irnl»i*rf . 
Wright, Jones, Simmons. 

Itm-vanl dash Dewing, Wright. Sted- 
iiiiiii. Miow . \ nimimim. Heading, 

2#i-y»rd il«*li — I»u*e1t«, tttedman, 

SillOW, 

440-yard .1.^1. Imwiif, IE«»l»er»Miti. 

WKO-VHItl lllinh lowing. 

Hurdle*- SiwHI, UolMimoii.Meserve, 

\tliml long, 

iliuli jump lowing, Neweti, Heading, 

ItroHil juiii[> ,N*pw«»!I, Spgnrer , Kead- 
Htf 

I'oli- miiiIi -Spencer , Heading. 

M.oi put S>wi.|l, Blsmhard, Wood- 
ward, Meaerve, 



WANTS APPLE PICKERS 

There is ■ ciiuui-i- tor Aguif sett to 
get some vi*ry practical experience in 
apple fiirkinu and sotting In the orchard 
i»t Harry Wrigat of WililamsBarg. Mr, 
Wright iuo> over oiio trees ol Baldwins 
> **i to ii»« picked and ism need id good 
iiiikerit. Ah an IneMental to the- aapvfj 
enre to Im> gained thirty cents an hour 
ami expenses ate ln-hnj palil durum ihi* 
w«*ek, Thirteen M. a. < . men worked 

lor Mr. Wright lunl Matuidav and Nun- 

day ami were very well treated, Dean 
Lewis im« decided to call imii* taken 
liy those nick teg apples la thin way, 
excusable to a certain extent. 



TOWN HALL 



Wrlfnr»lf.i>. 

Oct. 31 



Thursday. 

Nov. I 

poaMs lull 



Friday. 

Nov. 2 



Saturday. 
Nov. 3 



,S 



Tuetday. 

Nav. 6 



Harold I.nrHwood .out May 

AllUon in "The Promise" 

1 ai-ln. 
:;.i ,.,,i..„i,- i.i "The Fata! 

Pins.""!' 1 ' Pearl Walts. 
Mr. sad Hrt. Sydney Brew. 

"Oliver Twiat" with Maris 

Dnro. I .ii i- 

anil 

Owea Hears In Roii.n,. 

Stonei." 1 sets. 

tdas Hay to "lilvulw 
Jsaa," I Hcta. 

Pirlonruph I ..rt.,.m 

t.rlilh Siorry In "Caatain 

Alvaras." .". «< i«, 
" The little- Stratesiit." 

k< i Art*. 
Patae News Cenedjr 

Jack Pick ford sad Lsalss 
Huff in "Oreat Exs*cta- 
tieai." 
Palhe Newt 

Paramount Comedy 

HsPictare* 
IIICIION DAY 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

IHBre tlrtuni » t" M ■• n„ t>*S to 5 p. m. 




RAHAR'S INN 



Norths ib r»o»n. 

EUI0PIAN PLAN 



Maaaa^hnastM 



Read Our 

Appeal to Aggie Men 

on Page 4 



SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Nexi to t 'arnpion's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

At't-nts for ftix I v i -•• » i in-. 

P. M. CURRAN C. F. DYER 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUGS AND CARPETS 

— K. I». MAUHII r»TA IK 



Mar* ■..•■«.. I mi II 

Stkphkn Lank Foi.ur», lac. 

MtNITAITHHINII .IKWItl.KIIS 

ISOnHOADWAY, NKW VOIK 

I'M'H A.M» ClflTifiWtlll 

I'INN AND KINtiH > 

aoLb, nilVbs ami* unowsm ikhmk 



DR. GEO. A. HAS WELL 

< >«*t « < »!>.- i t I i 



"H .Main St. 

\ol'llllllll|.ll.ll. Mil 

Writing 1 Paper 

With Class Numerals and College Seals 

A II kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

193297 High .St. 
S%LLS— 

Hart Schaf f ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and see our 
big more 



1 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



HBCKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OSTKOl'ATHIC PHYSICIAN 

305 LAMBIE BLD6., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



** HAM1* •• 



" BIDE-A- WEE 



»» 



Telephone 



Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

(lut .specialty— And othei pood tines:* to eat 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 
Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. | A. W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

Tel. 4'5 W | t . a n .,, tne iMirin* and Fraternity Heme*. 



HI V VOIR 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

I'tC, llf 



JBWBUEWS 

The E. E. Millett Estate 

\ lull line nf Client- .lewelrj, alwiiys in "lock 
Itrnkeu LCIMM h-I'Uh ed wliile yen *ait 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



UNITY CHURCH 

Pl.KAs *K t MIIKKT. 

Regular Sunday Service at 10 45 A.M. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

when- every student will hicH 
wit li a cordial welcome. 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

M.tke it on OIW of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of lire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

When the Beat 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Art- shown. 

PROCR4M CMAIMGEO DAILY 



FACULTY ADVISERS 

following the custom of laal yea* 
President Uutiertiehl announced al 
eh'apel Monday the faculty advisers foi 
the classes for this year. The opportu* 
nity for conference with selected faculty 
men who are capable of aiding men in 
their college problem* should nut be 
overlooked, in these days of sot-ailed 
efficiency, ©o-operat ion and conservation, 

all packed inlo a shortened and critical 
college year, a man cannot allord to 
Bllgttl such a combination of conditions 
as are ottered by these men. 

The class advisers are: HUH, Dean 
Lewis: 1919. Professor Chamberlain; 

11120, Dean Lewis and Professor Mac 
Kimmie: 1S)21, Professors Fhelan and 

Patterson and Mi. band. 



MEATLESS DAYS AT M.A.C. 

TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS 

The college has been asked by Slate 

Food Commissioner hmlicotl to aid in 

! the conservation policy of the country. 

consequently <>n Tueedaya and Fridays 

no meats will he served at the Dining 
Hall and cafeteria, it is hoped also 
thai the outside dining places will 
cooperate with the college, and the 
nation in observing this request. 



Then- .oe >e*<M <J(«. d g#»»c»*»fcl »oii »h-.ulfl 
buy you » 

COAL 
C. R. ELDER 



NEW EXTENSION COURSES 

The extension department ol the col- 
lege is planning to cooperate with the 
Hampden County improvemenl Leayue 
in offering advanced courses in exten- 
sion schools. Any town or community 
with a group interested and who believe 
that a school could be supported have 
only to lake up the matter with the 

League. Theeollega will provide suita- 
ble programs for the meetings which 

will cover three to live days. 8] lal 

emphasis will he placed on marketing 
and cooperative organizations, 



NO FRESHMAN HOCKEY 



RUMERY & FAY, Electrician 

PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton, - 

Quiet and Com Tollable— Evt rv 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

Eu ropea n I'lan 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

J atlUS IS nl Wroutflit Iron and lines I'iiic, 
\«Im- ami tittinifs for HtSSB, Waiil and 
I, ax v-«l>""»'.™ nut Mutniesm lu.llf r anil HIP* 
i Dvrili>a«.l1tM>4 lit toSkwrh. Mill HappHsa 
Knstncen onl i ■..iitracn.r* f««r steam »nrt 
lii.t tVatCI Nesting, Automatic Sprinkler 
Srstetu* Holler and hiiuliif I nmieetlims. 

Holyoke, Mat*. 



The Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. 



For inlunmition write to 

ELLIOTT HENDERSON, Special 

79 Milk .Street. 



in accordance with the general cur- 
tailment ol freshmen spoils, the fresh- 
man class will have no outside schedule 
in hockey this winter. The appropria- 
tion for hocky will not do much more 
than cover the varsity's season, and it 
was thought more advisable to make 
i he varsils schedule impressive than 
loiry to divide wilh the freshman 6 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Henry C. Higelow '*2<> of Milhille, N. 
J. has pledged Alpha (iaimna Uho. 

Herbert llaxler '19 has been appointed 
a permanent corporal in II company 
:101st Kegimeut, Camp Deveiis. 

Applications for the third training 
camp mas n,,w he obtained at the com- 
mandant's office hy nuking formal 
| application to t lie commanding officer. 
The camp applications should he in the 

hands of the examining officer before 

; Dec 1 otherwise thev will not he con- 

I 

; sidered. 

Special announcement to 1U18 men 

released by our old I'ncle " lugie" ; lrv- 

[ lag W, Iogalls has ipiielly announced 

his engagement to Miss Maude A. Nor- 

j ton ol New York city. "Lucie" claims 

that she is "l he pre! t iesi girl in New 

York," while she claims that she is 

"the luckiest girl in the world." 

Signs of progress The Coum.iw 

now has a war correspondent. "I'tittC 

Sauter. the noble dispenser «1 pop corn 

| an 1 soft drinks at I amp Deveiis, is to 

lurnish the college paper with timelj 
'tips ami comments ixmcernlng the d<>- 
llngs jiI Ayer. We regrel I hal "Puffy" 
[did not pass "the physical" but leel his 

service* as news itatherer will be of 

some compensation. 



DRAPER LUNCH 



Boston, 



Mass. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Hut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



KriTAHI.mtlKH Is* 



HaklUrjof EMPIRE 

The Celebrated A-J«*.sV -*V-^V" 



BOLTS and 
NUTS 



Northampton Players 

. THIS WEEK 

"THE DUKE OP KILLICRANKIE W 

C&rptrvUr & Morehousf, 

printers, 



Where all foods of the 
quality are served at the 
minimum price 



WM. M. KIMBALL, Proprietor. 



Mo i. Cook Place. 



Amherst, Mats 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Kvery young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's a 
"dead one." 



Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 




MERRITT CLARK & CO., 



144 Main Street. 
Northampton. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

I leach. Lincoln and Kingston Sts , 
BOSTON, HASS. 



only Ma blocks from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and easily reached from North Station 
by Klevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shoimand business centre, 
also to the theatres and places of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 
[Continued from page Sj 

won't have to until the company leaves. 
I am one of the only two fellows in the 
company who have been tqnad leaders 
since we struck the island. Thai's 
where the "Aggie" and the Plattsburg 
training counted. We can do all kinds 
of movements that I he army would ball 

all to ,for instance ;couipany square, 

Hankers right and left front into line, 
prepare for holo attack, and a raft of 

others. 

We have been on the main guard here 
twice, and 1 was corporal of the guard 
the last time. Four hours on and two 
Off for twenty-four hours, and three 
tilings at once was I lie least 1 had to do. 
All I could take oil on m\ two off Lours 
was my hat. 1 had to wear an auto- 
matic the whole twenty-four hours. 
Nome class. 

I've seen Whitney and "Nails" Ran- 
dall here, hut don't run into them often. 
I've also heard from lluuuy lla/.eltine a 
coiijde of times and guess he is having 
a pretty good time at Newport, 
Well, remember me to the gang, 

"rtfK" Kl.l.is 'IS. 



FRESHMEN 



Start your college year right. Buy your 
clothes and haberdashery where you can 
buy it to the best advantage — where you can 
find the largest variety and best merchan- 
dise made in the best styles at lair prices. 



Sheepskin Lined Coats, 
Sheepskin Lined listers, 
Snappy Top Coats, 
Reversible Collared Shirts, 



$6.50 to $10 
$13 to $24 
$12 to $30 
$1.50 to $5 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 




Cow 
Owners 

Expect More 

From a 

0g LAVAL 



more cream 

longer wear 

——better service 
better value 

And They Get It 

A catalogue of the New De 
Laval machines will be gladly 
sent on request. 

TNE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



186 Hko aiiw a v 
N1W YORK 



29 B. Mauiuon St, 
CHICA80 



(»n Active Service with the 
American Expeditionary Forces, 
Frame, .sepl. 7. 14*17. 
Dkaii Don: 

Pardon a short letter. It goes through 
two censors. Probably you will he sur- 
piised to learn that 1 have enlisted in 
the T. S. A. A.S. Well, I was kind of 
surprised myself when I found thai I 
was really in the army. Al Spaulding 
and Uiggtns ex-10, are over here with 
me and I couple of our classmates are 
in training at Allenlown. Al Spauld- 
ing is in the same section as I. This is 
a great place, and 1 hope you can see it 
MHDetlme after the war. Also I hope 
you will not see it until then because 1 
believe you would do a lot more good 
in college. 1'lease write me any college 
news, and especially news of the class. 
GlVfl my best regards to all the fellows 
and tell them all to write. 

Yours sincerely, 

I'l'H >TK FltKIIKItH K V. W\tOII '20. 



Suits in Every Style and Price 

Guyer Hats 

Manhattan Shirts 

Altaian Cravats 

Oakes Sweaters 

Interwoven and Holeproof Sox 




&uvy7t8l>*. Hart Setoff ni»r4 Start 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

n.'ii-t s.ii.iiin. r .v Murx Ctt>tl»ea 



School ana College photographers . . . 




tl, S, Armv Ambulance Service. Sec. H9, 
American Kxpeditiotiary Forces, 
France via. New York. 



FOR THE HONOR OF M. A. C. 

Aggie Men in Service for the Coun- 
try and College. 

lioger Clapp ex-'lH.— Is in the Ameri- 
can Field Service in france aa au Am- 
bulance driver. II - addrean i« 21 Kite 
Uaynoiiard, Paris. S. S. I*. 1H, C onvoU 
Automobile. 

A card dated Aug. 30, states that 
Camel !• U. Fuller ex-'lH, is enjoying 
himself very much in the aero ser- 
vice. Mis address is HHth Aero Squad- 
ron, Kelly Field. .South San Antonio, 
Texas. 

Brooks Light 17, is at present in the 
depot brigade. Camp Devetis. but ex- 
pects to transfer to the aviation corps. 



LOCALLY: 5 2 Center St., Northampton Mass., 

and South Hatiiey, Mais 



Main Office: 

1546 1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



\3 * ^^i » u * jv^~~ * ~ ' *^v*n& '&*i**n^ 



MOVIE CORRECTION 

Moving picture price* were enoneous- 
ly stated in la«t week's issue of the 
Coi,i,Kiii.\>.-, In the evening the regu- 
lar lifteen cent price will stand as usual, 
the management standing the war tax. 
In the afternoon, however, movie [.rices 
will be eleven cents. 



i 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

write t«»«i«*;v *«*■* i»i*io«?» *»« 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



! 



1£J57 Th * ■«»»•>**« Farmer*' Standard f»r Sixty Year* 1917 

! Ask For Our Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 





.X. I. I *-«■ — -. Ay.-n.'.v Moiio u < r 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

BnhiidilMT of thn American Agricultural Clmmlcnl C«». 

51 CHAMBERS STREET - - • NEW YORK CITY 









8 



The M— " j"™"» Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917. 



FRATERNITY MEN PLEDGED 

[Continued from pai£<' I 



A Ibcll I). Long. 

Ittchard Siallen, 

It. II. Saulord, 



chicnpee 

( ;, in I . I i. 1 U '• 

Wesiiield 



i. wiiik v < hi \i ni v. 



Plskdale 
\\ lutbrop 

Sulloii 

I -y ii ii 

Williumsiown 

Suiuli Kaslon 

Lexington 

Chatham, N. J. 
Deerneld 

Soinerville 



I 'an I \V. Brown, 
Charles II. Brown, 
John i>. Hrigham. 

I.camler W. Fisher. 
Mark II. I.alusha 
Wlntbrop W. ttowatd 
William H. Lyon, 
Charles N. Miller, 
(Frederick BtebWnn, 
clarence M. Wood, 

C. W.S. Wilson. Jr.. New Wockelle.N. Y. 
Ralph K. Neuber, Washington, I). C. 

Stanley Fryman, Needham 

J. It. Smith. Kur Hock aw ay. H. v > • 

M.I- 1 1 A sH.U V 

Harlan W. Caskill, 
Francis K. Parke Jr., 

John Sewandowski. 

Bdward \v. Martin, 

Kenneth Sloan. 



■in. 

Amherst 

Sloiu'hani 

K;isl hainpton 

\mherst j 

A mherst 



M.rii \ <i vm H * i:ii<». 
jamcss. Bennett, Merlden, Conn. 
Lawrence M. Cooper, Chariemonl 
Donahl Laeron, Rowley 

ttlcbard 0. Peek, Bhelburae 

NEW BOTANY LABORATORY 

v new laboratory fur plant physiology 
has just been completed at the Depart- 
,„,.,,! of botany. The new addition to 
(lark Hall is BOt a greenhouse, as is 
generally supposed, and as announced 
In tb« last nuniber of the Coi.i.koi an. 
although it is of gUm eoaatroetion In 
in order to provide satisfactory light 
eoadltlOM. Hi*' laboratory is lot ad- 
vanced undent* and about twenty-four 
,. :lll i„. accomodated. Concrete lebiea 
of special and ordinal design give sta- 
bility for growth-recording and other 
appratus. \ dark room and adjoining 
haseinent space provide other features 
required for physiological work, ideal 
,,,„,!,, ions for the study of growing 
plants have heen ..l.laiue.l an. I it is be- 
lli rd thai no Letter opportunity 'an he 

found for training in this branch of 

botany. 

During the summer the Department 
has also a.lded LO its equipment a Freas 

. electric sterilizer, a steel herbarium 
ease lor the mycologteal collection ami 
thirty -six microscopes, 

LOST -ONE LARGE, FAT GOOSE 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Pudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 

— AT— 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Amlie»>t, Ma.ss. 




COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 

CARS 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



•Who swiped the g< " Thin is ( 

,he bin que*! iu» of the campus, second , 
only to the discussion* of the informal, j 
The college detective tote*, abated by 
afofmninniil aid from the outside, bare 
been eo.uplelely baffled. The only clue 
,hat has been uncovered is ottered by 
an UlHMrioM senior enjoying a consti- 
tutional at WB I «• f" r «»»* wfft, «" "' 
moraine nit m the moustache. Be 
claims that an he approached the 
bridge, at Ho- npp«rend of (he pond, 
he saw four husky looking chap- 
masked and carrying clubs, one had a 
bug. Whistling, bravely he passed on, 
unconscious 'of a tragedy In abeyance, 
.sound* »f deadly struggle reached him 
later, but not being a member of the 
Society tor Prevention of < ruclty f» 
Fowl 'he -carried on." ««« morning 
„ot even a feather remained and all 
thai could be found were several con- 
tented face s on the earopua. 

Lieutenant .!».»,, C, Powell, HHtb Horn- 
pg,ny.*T Halt., Depot Brigade, Camp 
Uevcni was on the campus last Satur- 
day enjoying a few -stags- Rt !*■ 
informal. 



M. A. 0. Athletic Kie'd Aeaociatiou. 

*N on- Athletic Aaaociation. 

The College Senate, 

Football Aaaociation, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Aaaociation, 

Basketball Aaaociattou, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Aaaociation. 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Mm, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Aasoctatioo, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club. 

Interclaaa Athletic Committee. 



Telephone 

C. A. I'eters, Secretary— 4.J4-W 
II. M. Gore, Secretary — 403- M 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer— 403-M 
II K. Bobbins, Manager— res. 62-VV 
I,. T. Bucktnan, President— 416 
.J. A. i I ■», --an, Mmn*g«— «^I4 
K. U. Hawley, Manager— 83 14 
O. S. Flint, Manager— o44-M 
W. S. Sawyer, Manager— .»43 
I n. Odains, Manager— S08-M 
S. F. Tutbill, President— 416 
A. F. Williams. Manager— 8364 
1). M. Li|»hires, Manager— 416 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 83 U 
B, M. Btiffurn, Manager— 8o64 
1). (). Merrill, Prwident— 4 1^6 
.1. U, Dsv, President— 83 1 i 
II. L. Ruaaell,* Preeident— H9-R 
W. Hurlburt, Preaident— 4*24-M 
(). G. Pratt, Secretary— »*7 



Leave M. A. C. lor Holyoke at j-a©, K.IO, 

4 ,o, 10-20, and at so minute* past the 
ho. H until ii-*> P.M. 



CARS 



Leave Amherst for M. A. C at 6 05 6 25- 
700.7 30, 8oo.8-iS,9-»S.9-3o.io-i3.«o-30- 
„., 5 .m-j«.i*-3°. .2-45. 1-3°. '45 "d at 

_ _ . «». v ... .... ».. .. 1; ann 

4$ niiiiuics p*», ,«»^ 

at 10-30 and 1 1 00 p. m. 

Last car at 12 30 a. m. 

Special Cmn at RmmmI* HbI «* 

lilHERSI l SUNDERLAND SLJ1 CO 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SKITS FOR NIKE 

(HHUVrurrthiwr. Tlrhetat**" 

11 AMITY MBtET 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs 
Sodas 



Candy 



Maw. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From AmhersL via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, paat the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and acroas the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mltea of Traa*«ge-fto*ert 
Equipment -Train Dispatch- 
ing Syattw-Fraiffct and Ba- 
press Sarvtee over cnt irr line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

PrjmnafW 
wwtKpwi>| 



Amherst 

CO - OF LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirta, 

Collar*. - 

CnrB, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10 1JC 

a tic 
s tic 

48c per dot. 

30c per dot. 



DRY CLEAHIHG AHD P1ESSIBG 

Steam Preaaing 400,3 Suita for %\m 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, fi-S© * Suit 

All WW r*r»W« M ro-op. «*tort snd psrceU 
left lB«re irtll recslve prompt »tt«otten. 

ttmAYsea IT. *a«nt 

HlMtnoTllS nt, AMI. Af«nt 





tal 



Vol. XXVIII. 



AGRICULTURAL 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November t, 1917. 



No. 4 



UPPERCLASSMEN EASILY 
WIN FOOTBALL CONTESTS 

Both Games Go by 19-0 Score. Sev- 

era! Long Runs. Summaries 

and Lineups. 

In the tirst games of the inter-clasB 
i.i.iil.iiU series Sat unlay Nov. 8, the 
upper-classmen seemed to have the ad- 
vantage all the way through as was 
Hlinwn by the respective scores: Seniors 
19, sophomores 0, juniors 1», freshunii 
0. 

lu the ttrst game, 1»1» vs. IfU. il«e 
juniors outplayed their opponents practi- 
cally from the start, playing a ruore 
open and aggressive game. The fresh- 
men played a good defensive for a few 
minutes hut gradually weakened before 
the faster 'ID eleven. Hansell made the 
lirsi touchdown on a perfect forward 
pass thrown by Whittle. The goal was 
not kicked. In the second quarter Man- 
Hell repealed by scoring on another of 
Whittle's long forwards and Koss kicked 
the goal. The clever work of Williams 
netted a good twenty yards but the half 
ended with the score still 13 to Ola favor 
• >i 1919. '21 started the second half with 
a rush with HaeConaaek and Miller do- 
ing the line plunging. '19 then held 
I hem for downs and there was no scor- 
ing unlil the fourth quarter. A feature 
of the third quarter was an end run b> 
MaeCormaek who plowed the opposing 
team for thirty yards. In the last quar 
ter l^avitt intercepted a forward pass 
for a gain but the freshmen failed to 

bold their advantage. Williams and 



Y. M. C. A. CAMPAIGN SWEEPS FAR ABOVE 
GOAL SET. OVER SIX THOUSAND PLEDGED 

FIGHT STILL ON 

Totals Up to Tuesday Noon Reach High Mark of $5845.05 Faculty Prom- 
ise $500 More. Other Contributions Still 
to Come In. 



Whittle both made long runs ami W un- 
tie finished things up by carrying the 
pigskin across the line for the third 1919 
touchdown. As no imue Kortng was 
made the game ended with a score of 19 
to U in favor of the juniors. 

The seniors started the seeundgame 
by pushing the sophomores to their goal 
line in the rirat few minutes of play. 
lint the latter eleven held like a stone 
wall on their own f>-yard line and kicked 
out of danger. The upper classmen, 
however, proved too strong for them 
and persistently rushed I lit* ball down 
the Held, (toodwin made the lirsl 
touchdown and Carter failed to kick the 
goal. In the second quarter the sopho- 
more team was again forced to their 
6-yard line and again held firm, (bap- 
man broke away In the Mr»l of the 
seeuiid half and made a sensational run 
nearly the length ol the Said, tioodwln 
followed this play with a rnsh that car- 
ried the ball across the line for the 
second touchdown of the game- Carter 
kicked the goal- During the rest of the 
quarter the sophomores made a come- 
back but lost the ball before they were 
able to score. In the last period Steve 
Richardson, Chapman, and floodwlD 
made repeated long gains which wound 
uplnatonehdown by Richardson. No 
kicked on aeeonnt of a flnke. 

Uontlnosd OB PM« • I 



Smashing far ahead of the goal of 
♦5,000 in one of the moHt decisis < am 

paigua ever carried on at the college, 

the student body, elerieal stall, and 

faculty have pledged over ItOOOfor the 

student friendship fund, all within two 
days. The total pledge up to Tuesday 
noon stood at an,M45.05. The average 
pledge per male student waa f9JB t eoeda 
*11.6f>. The light is still on among the 
faculty and clerks, so thai averages 
are m.t available. The highest student 
pledge was $100. There were four 

pladgea ol <> 11 taen, two of *sr> each and 
seven ol *26 each. The highest faculty 
contribution was*lfi0. 

The campaign was to raise Aggie's 
quota or the $1,000,000 t.. t... eabaertbad 

by the eollcge students in America lor 
the V. M. <'. A. work. I'lans were for- 
mulated quickly and the whole thing 
put before the student body Sunday at 
chapel, when the drive began. The 
central committee, of which lteuinann 
'1« is chairman, with the aid of Mr 
Tinker, member of the internal'). mal 
committee ol ibe V M. C, A., had pre- 
viously started I he tund by pledging 
^j,,,,, ■ >- (^ .,,.»■ ........ i...t- 

It was also v.. ted to set Aggie's goal at 
•SOW. Mr. Tinker's appeal at chapel, 
and likewise at the fraternity and fac- 
ulty group meetings was frank but 
strong. He started the slogan, "give 
until it hurts. " It was taken up by till 
whole college and by Sunday night th* 



fund was far bev<>nd the halfway mark. 
Eighteen faculty members and 21H stu- 
dents had pledged |fi,0fS. The student 
drive was supposed in end Monday 
nigh! at 9-00, but even then all coiilibu- 
lii.ns were not in. In all, 372 of the 
men bad answered Ibe call, the fac- 
ulty pledging *5oo more and the clerks, 
aiming at (he |8Q0 mark, will extend 
the light throughout ibe week. 

Contribution! are payable any time 
op to Dae. 18. The central committee 
in charge consists q| Boyd, Clark, I.au- 
pheat . 8. s Smith. Hiciiaidson and bus- 
sell I*; Carpenter. Hurl, Hatchcbler. 
I'ark hurst and Kaxt<»n '10; Newell, 
Caadfl and I). II. Smith *W\ Mellon and 
llalleit 'il ; Kulleraud Hast ings for un- 
classified students, Miss Addilon for Ho- 
coeds. Miss brewster for the clerical 

staff and Professors Payne, Chamber- 
lain ami Payae lot the faculty, 

M. A. C. is the lirsl of the colleges of 
Massachusetts to stall the campaign. 
Hy setting the quota at £5,000 the com- 
mit lee started a precedent thai will be 
hard for the olhel college* to lead up 
to Hut to smash this above the $rMHK) 
,,. nW will mean all the more. 

The pledges up to Tuesday noon are: 

\m men s! udehls. $8,055.05 

#> C Is. ;«f».oo 

Faculty. ».6*M» 



MEN IN SERVICE INVITED 
TO INFORMAL NOV. 17 

Attempt to Get Boys Back from 

Camps. Freshmen Also 

Urged to Attend. 

November 17. 1017, will be a date to 
remember, if the plans of the Informal 
Committee mature successtully . < >'i 
that day I he second Inlormal of the year 
will be held, and (he committee is 
arranging for a huge attendance, both 
of undergraduates and of Aggie men in 
the service. Many of i be latter are in 
near-by camps, and lo make the invita- 
tion more pressing, all men in college 
having friends at the camps, have been 
urged to write them of the affair and 
urge them lo attend. 

Ibis informal will In all probability 
be ihe last opport unity for many of 
these men to see Aggie and be with 
Aggie men betore they go"aeloss", and 
a line time is being prepared for them 
by the Inlormal committee and an 
enthusiastic group of undergraduates 
who have signilied their intention to be 
present. Freshmen, w ho were debarred 
troin last week's informal on account, of 
President Huttertield's reception, are 
especially invited to attend. 



MUSICAL CLUBS UNDER WAY 

At the glee dub tryout, held Oct. 340. 
loach Higelow picked H5 men. He said 
that the material was exceptionally good 
and thai a very successful season was 
sure to ensue. The rehearsals for the 
concerts are lo start Nov. H. 

Fred C. Qotchell Of hpl inglield, t he 



< lelks. 

< it hers, 

Total. 



2JS0.00 
itfi 00 



ar.,84f».ofi 



BASKETBALL DEC. 17 

After the Saturday football games, 
.Sumner Dole 15, the basketball coach 
l,,i the coining season, met the candi- 
dates tor this year's t^am, in the Drill 
Hall, for a short talk. He announced 
that the indoor practice would begin 
Dec. 17, and in the meantime the team 
should hit the books and get in condi- 
tion. Track work will be taken up by 
the squad until Dec. 17. 

(if last year's squad tttOM remaining 
are McCarty, Babbit, I'arkhurst, I'opp. 
MeCarty, being the only "M" man 
among them. I'lo- captain-elect of last 
year, "lioo" <»ray son is in training at 
Ayer, Chapman, the manager-elect of 
football, will manage Ibis year*a basket- 
ball team. 

Dole was one of the best football men 
thai this college has «?«■ seen. Ib- 
played center and was the only man 
ever chosen from here as an All- 
American man. Since graduation he 
| has been in New Hampshire, where he 
baa coached champion basketball teams. 



SPECIAL FRENCH SCHEDULE 

professor llae&lmmta has announced 
that he will base .lasses In conversa- 
tional French on Mondays and Fridays 
Ihe but period, and the llrst period in 
ibe afternoon on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days, Although there is BO credit 
given in this course, those taking it will 
be required lo report at class at least 
two limes a week. 



JUNIOR OFFICER8 ELECTED 

The junior class officers, elected at a 
class meeting Friday night in the Old 
Chapel, are as follows: 

President, I'aul Faxon of Wellesley 
Hills; vice-president, Kobert D. Chis- 
holm of Melrose; secretary, Myrtou F. 
Kvansof Somerville; treasurer, Arthur 
M. McCarthy of Monaco; historian, 
Stewart P. Batoholderof North Heading; 
class captain, Kdward A. White of Provi- 
dence, R. I.; sergeant-at-arma, Kenneth 
S. Williams of Sunderland. 



past coach ol the Mt. Holyoke and Smith 
college mandolin clubs has been en- 
gaged to coach ihe Aggie mandolin 
club this year. The club is to meet 
Thursday evening for the opening 
rehearsal. 

The opening engagement of the Musi- 
cal Clubs is to be at lladley, Dec. 7, 
under the auspices of Hopkins Academy. 
This concert haa been well patronized 
in former years. 

(in Dec 8, ihe Musical Club* will play 
and sing at the Student Show, and on 
Dec. 14 the banner concert of the yeai 
will take place at the Springfield Audi- 
torium under the aoaplees of a popular 
Springfield organization. This is lo be 
the first real big thing Of the year for 
Ihe college Musical Clubs and a large 
Aggie following is expected, as well as 
I large Sprlnglield gathering. There i-, 
lo be a dance following the concert, 
which .night to draw the student bod] 

COLLEOIAN FOR SOPHS 

At a recent meeting the sophomore 
class voted to send the Coi.i.koia* lo 
all 20 men in millilary aerric: Tin 
aendlng of the Collkoian will not only 
keep the meu in touch with Aggie Irft 
and Aggie news, but will serve a,Iao as 
lilting proof that their patriotism and 
sacrifice in answering the call will not 
soon be forgotten. 



\ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Kditor'i note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
I nun letters from the Aggie men at tbe 
front.] 

Army and Navy 
Foung Men's Christian Association, 

Oct. 25, 191?. 



ities of an officer in this game are 
terrific, but believe, me, its a wonderful 
challenge. 

We've got ten miles of trenches up 
here and expect to spend a week or two 
in 'em soon, simulating actual condi- 
tions at the front. 

Harold M. Gokk '18. 



Lanchy, France, Sept. 17, 1917. 



.Inst a few lines in the way of a report. 
I i In mull i that perhaps you would be 
interested to know the whereabouts of 
the men who did uot return to college 
this full. I have been here at tbe train- 
ing station since July 18. After a week 
in I he detention camp 1 entered the 
hospital school. 1 have been very well 
sutisticil with the hospital corps thus 
far. Nearly half of the men in thescbool 
iiln re are about 600 in all) are college 
men, most of them from southern col- 
lencs. We attend lectures six hours 
cm ■!> day except Saturday, and three 
i '\i-ningH i week we have an hour and a 
half study period. We take up the fol- 
lowing subjects, anatomy and physiol- 
ogy, hygiene and sanitation, first aid 
ami emergency surgery, nursing, hos- 
pital and ward duties, clerical work, 
materia ineilica. toxicology, pharmacy, 
baadaglag and chemistry. The course 
ordinarily is six months, but it is now a 
little more than three. I am posted to 
take examinations Nov. 19 and I must 
take written examinations on each of 
the above subjects. 1 expect to leave 
here before Thanksgiving for three 
months of practical work in a naval 
hospital, after which I probably will be 
transferred to a ship or to a base hos- 
pital in France. 

I know you would be surprised to see 
the elaaf of men who have been coming 
it> tin- station all through the summer. 
I- leu in the ordinary branches such as 
ilif st-amen and firemen these are a 
t lean cut class of men. None of us 
have any cause for complaint; we get 
very good food and good treatment. Of 
course I would like to be go:ng back to 
Aggie, hut under the conditions I am 
well satisfied here. I am planning to 
take the (fatal opportunity to visit dear 
old Aggie. 

Fi:\\k D. LSA»I 'IK. 
I '. B. Naval Training Station. 
Hospital School, Newport, R. I. 



tl < o., 17 P. T. I!.. 
I 'i. ATTsnrno Baimiai KB, 
Nkw fOBX, <KT. 27, 1M7. 

I sure have neglected your royal high- 
ness, and feel duly wrot np oref said 
fact, but, its truth, a man doesn't have 
time to do anything out of step — we 
eat, breathe and sleep "in eadencV* aod 
must even write letters **by the num- 
bers," and your number has just 
arrived, 

I wan! to tell you that we sure are 
having some time here. I never spent 
two months like li before. Wonderful, 
but a man becomes more and more im- 
pressed with the fact that he knows 
less and less. Our boys are doing 
splendidly up here, Harlan Worthly, 
Charlie Huntington, I#onls Spsttlding, 
especially, 

We have been the recipients of vari- 
ous lectures, during the past iwo 
week>s. Hotu officers, English and 
French Invalided by one means and 
another, who sure have worked the 
Plattsbtirg contingent op to a lighten- 
ing pitch. A fellow feels that he'd 
like to jump Into the front line trenches 
to mo r row , but he won realizes that he 
has got '" ''""' bbi heels hour enough to 
gat Ho- ..hi dope first. Tbe responsibil- 



Time goes so fast over here that 1 
cannot keep up with it. Tbey told me 
yesterday waB Sunday, but 1 have my 
doubts yet. To us Sunday is the same 
as any other day. We wake up in the 
morning, have our coffee, scrape the 
mud off our cars, fill them up with gas. 
and then wait for a call. If we are on 
duty at tbe front, our Sunday dinner 
consists of bread and sardines. 

During the last week and a half, our 
car, No. 19, has been doing some work. 
Tuesday night we went to the front and 
stayed there 24 hours without sleeping, 
ruuning back and forth from the hos- 
pital to the "poste de soucis," a distance 
of 15 kilometers or 10, miles. Wednes- 
day night when we returned to the 
camp we found that our car had been 
placed upon evacuation work. That 
night we made 85 kilometers or 00 miles, 
half of the time without lights, taking 
the sick, not the wounded, to an evac- 
uation hospital in a town about 10 
miles from our camp. That night we 
slept two hours with our clotbeB on. 
When we arrived home Friday night we 
were pretty near ready torunthecar 
up along side of the wall and sleep. 
It sure was a great night to sleep. Dark 
and rainy and the wind blowing, just 
the kind of a night to sit by the fire and 
smoke. For comforts' sake I even 
crawled into my pajamas. Usually we 
take off only our puttees. 

At half past eleven someone Woke me 

up, shaking the life out of me, and tell- 
ing me to hurry up and get dressed. A 
hurry call bad been sent out from 
the front line post for two extra cars. 
We were one of the fated ones. It was 
so dark we couldn't see three feet ahead 
of our radiators, and raining "mud tur- 
tles". (And absolutely all lights out 
at 9 o'clock). If that was not some wild 
ride, then i am a liar, iue next day 
the lieutenant said we had done so 
much work that he would give us two 
days vacation. Tonight tbe old car 
catches it again. 

Yes, we are Uoited States soldiers now. 
The day after I wrote you, we were 
olheially sworn in and examined by two 
U. S. officers who are going around to 
the different sectors in a Ford. Pay, $86 
per month and all our clothes furnished, 
Also, we get s 10 days' vacation at the 
end of every four months, to go to any 
place in France we so desire, with our 
railroad fare paid. Also tbe number 
of days it takes to get to that place does 
not count on onr 10 days. Karl and 1 
have decided on Algeria, (a French 
colony), for our first permission. 

I bought a camera when I reached 
Paris. Every fellow In France has some 
soft of a camera, which makes it fine, 
for what one fellow misses, the other 
will be certain to get. There is always 
some kind doctor who is very glad to 
develop the films for us, after which we 
buy tbe paper and do the printing our- 
selves, If we get a good picture we 
trade it around, in that way each 
one of us is making a good collection. 
Two or three times I have traded 
some of my pictures for some of those 
taken in tbe trenches by a Frenchman. 
I have some dandies. For example; I 
have a picture of a hunch of band gre- 
nades exploding in the trenches, I have 



IF you want to buy a bed, or sell that old macki- 
naw, or get rid of some books, or let somebody 
know you sell theme paper, etc., etc., etc., there are 
two alternatives: Kither take a chance or reach 
every student through "Thk Cou.ec.ian." 



THK rates are ioc a line an issue, address 
included. No advertisements for less than 
three lines. Drop your order in the mail box in 
"The Collegian" office or see the advertising 
manager. 



THE DAVENPORT 

The unsurpassed eating house for "Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



II. L. RIBBELL. Mgr.. "is 
B. M. BUFFUM. '19 



R. B, COLLINB, MS 
F. K COLE. 'It 




M. A. C. 

Basement of North Dormitory 

ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 

SPECIAL ITaLE FOR ONE WEEK 
Columbia Scratch Pads, 8 1-2 in. by 5 in., - • 4 cents, 3 for 10c 

LooK over the new College Seals, 90 cants 



Chrysanthemums 

Yellow PinK White 

POMPOMS AND SINGLES 
For the Dinner Table ... 

No Gift is More Significant of the 

True Spirit of Friendship Than 

a Box of Chrysanthemums 

Grown on the Campus 

Telephone 300 



The "Nonotuck* 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 
FIREPROOF EUROPEAN 



RATES, $1.50 PER PAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
—Proms— Our Specialty. 



P. J. BEHAN 



iM 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917. 



another of the town in which we are 
doing our work, taken liy an aviator 
who gave it to me. Boms of these 1 
may get a chance to send home, but 1 
cannot do ho through tbe mail. 

In all probability ottl tectioa will go 
down to the VosgeB mountains in Alsace 
Loraine. Just now we are opposite St. 
Quentln. Ab we go over the hill to one 
of our posts we can look right down to 
the city (held by the Bosch e). The 
French are just on the outskirts. Some 
sight, believe me 

i "est la guerre, 

W ai.to.n B. M'lsori,, ex-'lll. 



Hasp Hospital, tamp Devens, Mass. 

I have been transferred from the 
Depot Brigade to the Base Hospital. I 
have been assigned to tbe Medical Sup- 
ply Depot No. 1, where my work will 
consist of typewriting and clerking. 

Here the barracks are about one 
fourth the size of the ones we had at 
the Depot Brigade. They are only one 
story high and aeeom module about 60 
men. We have sheets, pillows and pil- 
low eases. Instead of standing in line 
wit h a mess klt.our food Is all net on the 
table for us and all that we have to do 
is eat It. We don't have to wash any 
dishes. 

This Job lasts seven days a week and 
it N hard to get a pass. However we 
do not have taps so we are off from 5-30 
p. m. loo-HtiA. m. 1 ean jjo home at 
Bight, which I do quite frequently. 

The Base Hospital Is nearer tbe town 
of Shirley than Ayer. The Nashua 
river runs just behind the hospital and 
some of the fellows have rijjued up I 
ferry aeross the river. It consists of a 
flat bottom row boat with a top* on 

• it lit»r end tied on either shore. A wire 

• able is stretched letOM overhead for 
uuiding purposes. 

went home the other night and coin- 
ing back look the train to Shirley, 
arriviim there at 1-1'» ,\. m. When we 
1 1 took two fellows from Chesterfield 
home wth me to give them something 
t<> eat) arrived at the river, the l»oat was 
on the other side and the rojte was 
broken. There was uothing for us to 



do but to walk back to Ayer and then 
up to the hospital. We arrived at 3-80 

The Base Hospital is a mammoth 
place consisting of 40 wards with 82 
beds in each ward or 1280 beds alio- 
gether. All the wards are connected by 
corridors, of which there are miles. 

1 will try to come up to the old place 
some day if I ever manage to get a pass. 
Kiiank J. Bisks '18. 



S. S. HYDE 

J.-WOlfC ftllCl « »|»f It'll • 1 1 

IS pleasant street 

OevHstB 1 l*rpmrli>tton» Filial. Bt«>ken Usn*m% 

Areuratnly Keplaced. Fine Watch Hrpatr- 

fmr I'roiniUh «imI Hkllfulljf Ihinr!, 

.-iiil isf:o -1 Ion i.ii.ii:iiit<-i'<l 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable — Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

Kuropean I'lan 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

2 1 Main Street, Matonic Building, 
Northampton, Masa. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Closed only from I A. At. to 4 A. M. 



82 Co. 8th Bat. 
Depot Brigade, 
Camp Deveni, Ayer. 



Johnson Book Go, 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -> 



Uncle Sam is my employer now and if 
indications prove true, is destined to 
continue so in spite of any effort 1 may 
make to get "fired." Is It not so? 
Actually I'm surprised at the way I'm 
enjoying things here. Our company is 
stationed away up in the left hand cor- 
ner on good level ground, and a fine 
bunch of fellows are In my S4|uad, but 
by the way, 1 forgot to say, that 1 was 
appointed corporal the second day and 
now at last drill, acted as right guide 
with a rank as sergeant. Also Captain 
Mei Tiam.v, ho is a real oftieer.has started 
sending me to a non-com school and the 
acting major of our battalion intends to 
give us all a chance for permanent ser- 
geancies. 80 you see the boy's working, 
and there's no reason why 1 can't land 
the best tbey give. The only advantage 
the other men have over me Is the fact 
that they have been here longer. I 
realise that college opens tomorrow and 
it does seem bard not to go back, but I 
have Been several Aggie men here in a 
worse boat than lam in. Kelly. Cbera as- 
sistant, and N'orcn.Ks, privates. The bunks 
are warm ami the food is good. We 
have lots of time oil and don't drill bard 
when we do drill and so far. although 
the time has been short, it look* to un- 
like a more or Ian lazy man's life. 
However, I shall make it* hard enough 
to suit my own convenience. How** 

that t 

St a nit M. KiN<; 'SO. 

Oct. h, ion. 



W.-dnesda.v, Dot *4, IW17. 
Sixth Day at Sea. 
A week from that Wednesday I was 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hlllwan and Barnes streets, three 
block! from tbe t'nion Depot, Is a modern hos- 
telry ran on the Kuropean Plan. It to just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise anddnst, 
and vet In the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices $1 and up; room* 
with bat li {singlet $1.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated din- 
ing room makes a meal a pleasant memory 
everything of Ihe highest quality, well cooked 
and served In the best possible wanner. 

sta.\ at the Highland Hotel once and yon will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel. Springfield, Mass. 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



Eats, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



Freshman Hats 



GOOO SERVICE 



making final arrangements for my de- 
parture, The next morning we left 
camp— was on a transport fl»e hours 
later and sailing sImmiI four hours later, 
Klght after get ling on board I was 
assigned to guard duty ami bad to kee|> 
all men helow deck* a» we left the har- 
bor so I got a glini|me of tbe old I*. S. 
A. as we left the shores. We anchnred 
till 5 the next morning outside the har- 
bor when we joined a fleet of six other 
transports and two torpedo boat destroy- 
ers with a cruiser as ronvoys. 

fin fourth day out we bad to leave 
t be fleet and start back lieeatise of boiler 
1 rouble. We were a I it tie over woo miles 
from land although we had sig-sagged 
about 13000 miles when we started back. 
Alone on tbe ocean with tbe possibility 
of a hostile raider or sub-marine appear- 
ing and while you are in a crippled con- 
dition is anything hut pleasant. I am 
on look-out fluty every other S4 hours 
with four look-ouls to supervise. I am 
on one hour and off three and it is try- 
ing to sight any hostile ship or sub- 
marine. At night rbe ship is totally 
dark with a few blue lights in the hall- 
ways. It sure Is dark floundering 
around feeling your way on deck about 
mid-night. This noon we sighted aship 
and as It was tbe first we bad seen since 
leaving tbe fleet there was quite some 
excitement until it was found out that 
It was a friendly mew haul man. 
[CeDtiaasd en cage Ij 



Come to U8 for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brashes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see yon. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

I \M lofty yean we nave rendered faithful irrvice. For forty 

* yean we harc tried to make each year's amies swre Beady 

ideal. Tint untiring effort has Unit for u» not only The World'* 

Larger* Mail Order Seed BuarteM, but alio • World Wide 

reputation for Efficiency and uadwputed leaderdiip. The 

Fortieth Annivenary Edition of Burpee's Annual, ihm 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" ■ brighter and 

than ever. It m nailed free, A postcard will bring it. 



W. ATLEE BURPEE & C0. t Seed Growers, 

Building* Philadelphia 



1 



Page'i Shoo Store 

Largest Stock — Lowest Prices 
Expert RsBpelflnj^— Beat leatlieruaed 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the StudentB of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. LANPHEAR '18,Bditor-ln-€hlef 
WK81.KY 8. HAWYKK '1*. Athletic Editor 



Associate Editors. 

AKTHt'rt N. HOWKN Mil 

El-IOT M. liUFFUM '19 

AKTHI'K I.. ( ilANDUK "19 

MVRTON F. EVANS 



H 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
BIROERR. ROSEQl'IST'18, Bnilneti Manager 
8AMIKI. II. FEKK1SS 'l'.i. Assistant Manager 
<;. M. CAMPBELL *». Ad^ertislngManager 
JAMES C. MAPI.KS "20. rtrculatlon 

<;. ALFRED SMITH '20, Circulation 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Blrger K. Rosequlst. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amhertt 
Poet Office. 

Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Nov. 6. No. 4 



Osck more If. A. C. has taken the 
lead. The call for help for the student 
friendship war fund has been answered 
— and honorably — even as was that for 
agricultural workers and military men 
in the earlier stages of the war. Spon- 
taneously, without a prolonged cam- 
paign, without rallies and pleading, the 
students, faculty, clerical staff, in short, 
M. A. C, have given somewhat over 
$tt<»00fortbe aid of men in service. And 
all of this in two days. Moreover no 
money has been obtained by sitting 
down with a man and begging for it. It 
has not been obtained by the tireless 
(Hurts of a smooth committee. Each 
faculty or student member, given his 
card, has pledged, and pledged "until 
it hurt." It was his whole-hearted gift 
lo the cause. His choice was either a 
(small sacrilice or a bin one. He chime 
I he latter. Knowing him to be an 
Aggie man, no one could expect him lo 
do otherwise. 

The campaign is siguiiicant. It will 
nerve to show the Aggie men at the 
camps and in Fiance that the college is 
>till bock of them, heart and soul. It 
pmves that this spirit which we have 
„<> long boasted of, the Aggie lighting 
spirit so termed, was not a superficial 
thing. It was real. It could hold for 
the big things of life as well as for the 
trivial. This spirit meant that a goal 
inn Id be set, far above one ever dreamed 
of on this carapBB, and yet be more 
than reached. It has stood the supreme 
test. 

It was particularly significant that 
M ,\ < . should head the campaign for 
Massachusetts colleges. It is generally 
known that the class of men entering 
here are poor, that a targe per cent, of 
them work their way through, that 
even those who do not, cannot spend 
freely. Any contribution from such a 
class means a sacrifice. Surely MO 
hurts. Now it is up to some of our 
friendly rivals, who are wont to call us 
"sod busters, 1 ' who boast a wealthy 
oiflM bom whom even large gifts are 
not a sacrifice to see that they do not 
fall down to these farmers, so called. It 
Is Indeed a satisfaction for M, A. C. to 
be able to set a pace for these collages, 
and to set U so high that they too must 
pledge until It hnrts, or !>e brought to 
■haras, _^__^^_________ 

( heffords ex-*18 is In the Medical 
Supply Depot at Camp Devens, Ayer, 



SOPHS WIN TRACK MEET 

Walk-away With Freshmen by the 
Score of 97-45 
Nineteen-twentv won a complete 
victory over L991 in the first track 
meet of the season, Saturday; 
the final score being 07-46. The 
freshmen had good men on the field, 
but the sophs were there in numbers 
and the victory was an easy one. 
Seventeen of the point winners were 
gophomores, seven were freshmen. 

Dewing was the star man of the meet, 
winning two firsts, one second, and one 
third. Lent '20 and McCarty '21 were 
the next greatest point winners, with 
12 apiece. 

The 100-yard dash was the most pop- 
ular event with athletes, baring 1« 
entries. It was run in four heats, all 
won by the sophomores. Dewing was 
the champion in the finals. The high 
hurdles drew but three entries, all of 
1920. Newell was the winner. Fresh- 
men had the broad jump almost all 
their own way, McCarty winning lirst. 
and Sloan and Aluer tied for second. 
McCarty also starred in the 440, win- 
ning over Harrington, Maples and 
Dulcette, all of '20, by a wide margin. 
The two-mile proved to be an exciting 
race, being won by llalbtt '21 in a burst 
of speed in the last lap. 

The complete list of events ami win- 
ners follows: 

KHI-yard dash 1st Dewing '20, 2nd 
Lent '20, 8H Stedinan '20. 41 h Heading 
'20. Time — 10 3-f> seconds. 

Mile run -1st Lyons '20.2nd West '21, 
3rd Haslam '20. 41 h Simmons '20. 
Time-. r > minutes, 17 1-2 seconds. 

220-yard low hurdles— 1st Armstrong 
'20. 2nd Newell '2<>, Hrd Lent '20.4th 
Meserve '20. Time -808-8 seconds, 

High jump — 1st reading '20,2nd Dew- 
ing "20, 3rd Howen, Hallett. Kroeck "21. 
Height— 4 feet, inches. 

High hurdles- 1st Newell -20, 2nd 
Lent '20, 3rd Meserve '20. Time - 21 3-;') 
seconds. 

Broad jump— 1st McCarty '21, 2nd 
Moan and Alger '21,3rd Reading '20. 
Distance— 18 feet, 2 inches. 

440-yard dash— 1st McCarty '21,2nd 
Harrin gton aO y 3rd M aple* '80 '"• 
Dulcette '20. Time— 1 minute, 111 
seconds. 

Pole vault - 1st Spencer '20, 2nd uppe 
'20,3rd Ueading '20. Height— 7 fct. 
4 inches. 

Two-mile run— 1st Hallett '21, 2nd 
Wright '20, 3rd Blanchard '20,4th Sim- 
mons '20. Time— 11 minutes, 50 seconds. 

220-yard dash 1st Harrington '20, 
2nd Alger '21, hrd McCarty '21, 4tb 
I Hilrette *30, Time— 26 1-6 seconds. 

Discus throw— 1st Kroeck '21, 2nd 
Lent '20. 3rd Dewing '20.4th Mesem 
'20. Distance— (Wi feet, H inches. 

KSO-ysrd run— 1st Dewing '20. 2nd 
Lyons '20, 3rd West 21. Time— 2 min- 
utes, 1H seconds. 

Shot put -1st Kroeck '21,2nd Newell 
'20, 3rd Hlanchard "20, 4th Lent '20, 
Distance — 87 feet, 8 inches. 

InMVUH'.U. S( oliKH 

PofnU Pninti 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

1 enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1017-1018. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will — will not-send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Collegian, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 




Rain or shine *"Scotch Mists" 

are fine ! 

Rainproofed Scotch cheviots 
constructed after a formula of 
our own. 

All wool ! No rubber ! 

'Hmttt&t "' Tra d emark. 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the Best 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

PROGRAM CHANCED DAILY 



JICWKI.KWH 

The E. E. Millett Estate 

A full line of College Jewelry always In stork 
Broken Lenses replaced wblle you wait 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Every thing men and boys wear 

MAIL i'KI'KKH FILLED 

Rogbrs Pert Company 



Hroadway 
at lath St. 

Hioadway 
at Warren 



"The 

Four 

Corners " 

NKW YORK T1TY 



Broadway 
at 34th 8t. 

Fifth Ave. 
at flat at. 



Picture Framing 

Positive satisfaction and ihe right prices 

PAUL E. HUNNEWELL, 18' 

. l'hl Sigma Kappa House 



Dewing '*<>, U 

I<ent '211, 12 

McCarty *2l 12 

Newell 'MO, 11 

Knwik*2l. 10 

Reading '20, 9 

Lyons "20, i 

Harrington '20, 8 

Hallett »B 6 

Armstrong '20, fi 

Spencer '20, fi 

West *21. 5 



Alger '21, 4 

Blanchard 20, 4 

Meserve '20. II 

Oppe '20, :i 

Wright '20, § 

Stedman *20, 2 

Simmons '20, 2 

Haslam '20, 2 

Bowen '21, 1 

Hloan '21, 2 

Maples '20, 2 

Dulcette '20. 2 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



UNITY CHURCH 

Pleasant Stkekt. 

Regular Sunday Service at 10-45 A.M. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

- with- a- cordial welcome, — 



There are Seven Good Reasons why you should 
buy your 



COAL 

or 

C. B. ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk down town and create an appetite. 
Here hi where yon And the pies mother makes. 

Qood Service and Reasonable Prices 



Drugs 
Sodas 

Cigars 
Candy 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



The Holyoke Valve t Hydrant Co. 

Jobber* of Wrought Iron and I trass Pipe, 
Valves and Fittings for Steam, Water and 
ftas. Asbestos and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe 
Coverings. Pipe Cat toflketrh. Mill Supplies 
Engineers and Contractors for Steam and 
Hot Water Heating. Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems. Holler and Engine Connections. 

Holyoke, Mass. 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH ? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



SENIORS FULL OF PEP 

Have Frolic Before Football Games. 

Few in numbers, but full of "pep, 
the class of 191* came acroBB with a time 
honored santof frolic Satnrdaf after- 

noon before the class football games. 
Formed in parade fashion, a medley of 
disguises Hanked by elucidating signs 
marched upon the Held. C, T. Smith 
led the way with a silk hat aiidM'iince 
Albeit as I'rexy, followed l>y Pratt and 
Schlough as Mr. and Mrs. Default. Mil- 
lard demonstrated "The Working 
Thought" as he worked a typewriter 
held before him by two well appointed 
and liveried servants. In a burlesque 
football game, Lipshires retired from 
Millard in a rain coat. B. S. Smith feat- 
ured Requisition H., while Lawton made 
» hit as Secretary Watts. A hevy of 
maidens attracted considerable Dom- 
inant, especially liitter, who, as the 
Ballet Girl, appeared to he direct from 
the fool lights in his lloumes. Richard- 
son uava a variety to the performance in 
a composite hockey evening football 
—baseball suit and demonstrated a few 
tine plays in the game of crooiiH 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917. 



NO NEW BUILDINGS 

The trustees of the Massachusetts 
A -i s« ult ui.d Toilette, a t a recent meet- 
ing, voted not to ask the Mate Legisla- 
tor* of 1»18 to appropriate money for 
any new buildings at the rollege. In 
view ol the high CO«1 of labor and male- 
rial, and of t h,. ,1 and for hot h in the 

prosecution of the war, ii waa agreed 
not to press claims for new buildings 

this year, although the buildings, which 
would normally be Raked for, are those 

which have been badlj i <\>-i\ for manj 

fears, and tot which t he demand will 

be still greater as soon as the war la 
over and the college is obliged to pr»- 



THE AIM 



After twenty-live years close business association with tl.c best dressed 
men in your college : 

To keep our lines of young ...en's togs so utterly smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're spec ialists of twenty 
nve yeats experience. ' 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart "trench "overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 
vi'ie t..r the anticipated Increased {#• . _, _« 

at tendance, | Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coal made, 

""" ;m b»wever f several items of Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1. 50 $6.00 



minor Improvements ami equipment, 
tor which the college will ask this 
year, although ih,. trustees limited the 
amount of these requests to «ioo,immi. 



NOTICE REGARDING TRESPASS 

in the Coi. i, k«. ia.n of April 17, MM7, 
the attention of the students was di- 
rected to the fact that complaints have 
been made against students of this col- 
lege, as well as against others, for tres- 
pass upon private property ami upon 
the grounds of Wildwood cem.-ti-i >. hi 
particular it was explained that stu- 
dents and other parlies going togad 
coming from the rifle range had made a 

thoroughfare of the cemetery ami ,. 

figuous property and by acts of lawless- 
ness had given cause for bitter feeling 
on the part of (hose owii'iiy property, 
or having it in charge. 

Therefore, students are especially 
requested to acquaint themselves witii 
the trespass laws and carefully to heed 
and observe them when passing over 
private land. 

On the way to and from the rite 
range all shooting parties should keep 
to the public road. 



RESPOND TO THE CALL 

On last Thursday raornlag fourteen 
Aggie men left Amherst in response to 

Ihe call tot men lo save the apple and 

potato erop ..t Williamsburg. These 

men were joi | |, v two mor Friday 

and the crowd was augmented on Satur- 
daj b] tin- men. 

Mr. Wright, the owner ..( the apples 
ami potatoes. Healed the men in noble 
fashion. They received, la addition to 
board and room &i the beet hotel in wii- 
liaimd.nrg, remuneration to the extent 
of thlrtj cents an hour. Although the 

men had to bleak up I he new formed 
habit Of Sleeping until seven \. m. they 
enjoyed the Hip very mti.-h and received 
a great deal ..l real practical experience. 
The Aggie men saved thi apples from 
over a thousand trees, and over four 
hundred bushels of potatoes. They 
showed thai tbej were willing towlth- 
•raada I tile physical discomfort, the 
frigid atmosphere mostly, in order to 
help the present food crisis and Au»i< 
Is proud to say that ihe Is among ih, 

first to do her small share at this lime 



At the Young- Men's Specialty Shop 

1 ■•""pi""'- <*. - Amher!11 

_ SEE CAMPION FIRST 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: l-:»,, 1-H p. m Sunday and 
other In.iirs liy appoint merit . 

Croysdale Inn 

Wit r 1 1 II Mif,RY. HAHH. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat 

feiepbeaa aa»w, ii»iv»ke. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Weal to ( ampion's 

JOKK FOTM, MOP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Atfentt for i;.-» Typewriter 

F. M. CURRAN c. F. DYER 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

"Doe" Allen ex-lS, | 8 a eorporsl in 
the Medical Supply Depot at Camp 
Devens. 

Bogholt 'ltt, recently confined at th. 
ingrmary with pneumonia, is rapidly 
recover! nj{. 

Quadland '20, who sustained a aeriou.-. 
spinal injury in football practice, has 
been forced to leave college. 

Schenkelherger ex-*!9 is among the 
Aggie meo bow in France. Be is a 
sergeant la the 102nd Machine Gun Bat. 
tallon of the American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

Word was received on the tarn pus 
that Warren H. McKaught ex-'lH, and 
Miss Unice Bea, Mt. Holyoke "1", were 
married at Burlington, Vt., on Oct. 30. 
"Fat" is at present stationed at Ft. 
Kihan Allen as a gnd lieutenant. 

Jack Smith '18, who has been on i he 
campus moil all summer and this fall, 
left this week to join the Boston fiiy 
Hospital Unit, This unit is known as 
Base Hospital No. 7, and will be the 
second to leave New England for France. 
Ex-lnstruclnr Hazeltine of the math 
amatics department was on the campus 
Saturday, Nov. 3. lie is at present in- 
structor in algebra in the Naval Itadiu 
Service, and stationed at Newport, it, [, 
He finds the work interesting, and, (in 
his own words) "very fascinating," but 
says be would rather be back at Aggie. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

1 I latl tennis tournament between 

• and tsso, wHicn was postponed last 

spring, due toil arly closing of col- 

lege, trill in all probability be played 
oit during this week. The courts bare 
been put Into condition, and all that la 
Becefiarj is Ihe Raal groomiugol the 
men. The matches will coastal .»t four 
single and two double matches. The 
teams are- l!»H»-ISiilIu„,, .skinner. W, 
Smith, .Spauldlng, liowe, Sweeney and 
I'lerson manager; IHgo Home, Hbb- 
ards. Snow, f ,de. i enter. Maple*, U : ,m. 
Ii'"':. K. Ilurd, ami J, \. Crawford, 
manager. 



ThurMUy, 

Nov. s 



' • ni.i >. 
Nov. 9 



Saturday. 

Nov. 10 



SENATE MEETING 
At the last meeting oj the College Sen- 
ate, held Oet. HOtb, a letter from Presi- 
dent Huiteriieid concern! off the recent 
thefts of poultry and fruit was, read, and 
it wiw voted that Roseau take tl„. mat- 
ter up with Ihe student* at the nest 
maw meeting. The Senate dIeetNsed 
the organisation ami activities «.t the 
unclassified students with tbe officers of 1 
thai body, Freshman candidates for s 

pond party were voted on. and ■ pond 
party was announced Oct, ;u. 



TOWN HALL. 

I 

Mme. Prtrova ln**Th« Secret 
Wednesday, •• Eve." | turtn. 

Www. 7 M t, 't'lV"*'' "1 " T *« '•»•• 

Pias." with Pearl Whits. 
Mr. and Hr§. Sydney Drew. 

Frank Mclntyre In "The 
Traveling Sales man" 

arirt 

M A r .? W i-oe*Wood and May 
All non m "ltd Tremaine" 

fauline Frederirk In "Tfca 

Eternal Cl*y„" « ;.»rs«.. 
Pinograph Bray Cartoon 

< oaeetl ti> M»ri«1olln and 

• .mt., i tint, 

Marnuerite Clarh in "Tke 
Fortune* of FifJ." 

fad «.|,is.«l.. of "Tbe Fl«htin« 

Trail " 
Path* Mews Camedy 

ArtrrhTt (■rpnents tin? I,i.i,.,,i, 
_ . , Ur«M»«tw»y Star. 

Elite Fereaten In Earbary 



rlenday and 
Tataday, 

Nav.l2aadl3 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

-K. D. MAKHII »*TATE- 

»'■»•» "i •■■>!■ laws 

Stkphkn Lank Folgeb. dac 

M»NI'r»(1ll|(IN(l JRWILIIIN 

1«*» BROADWAY. NKW YORK 

OTAJB AND OOI^KCiK 
^*TKSi ANU KlM.s 



r#ri .T^ 



„ TWO DAY* 
Man. and Tset.. ■•*, If, 13 



Kventaa nriie*. ISioi.t tae<|np|iiclei the t.i* 

MatisM itrl.fP. • Ile»duiu.6e..hiiflr,„ 

The intra ecru la the u,*. 



no i.n. iii.vm ANn momi! »f»naiji 

DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

• >eat«jtoi»t 1 1 fa 



7M Main Hi. 
v. .it • . . . • n i . i . . ( i . 



lV1>*«an. 



E. B. DICKINSON.D.D.S. 

I»ENTAL ROOMS 
Williams lilock, Amherst, Mass. 

Offiee (tours tta Vt a. m., 1-snton p. m. 



Writingr Paper 

With Class Numerals and College Seals 

All kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 
Pens, Banners and 



J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and .stationer 



SMOKER COMMITTEE 

The jiuiioiH. in anticipation of h Hax H 
smoker within tbi> next two weeks, 
have elected ■ eonailtlM, conpoaed of 
W, A. Baker, \v, i». field aad r, a. 
Mattowa, to make the necessary arrange* 
merits. 



I" 



RAHAR'S INN 

trthamnton. MasaaanuMtta 

EOROPBAN PLAN 




Read Our 

Appeal to Aggie Men 

on Page 4 



Gallup at Holyoke 

*93-*97 High St. 
SELLS— 

Hart Schaf f ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke aad see our 
big store. 



+w* 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917. 



1 



Candies and Ice Cream 

** HAMP" 

" BIDE-A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Oar Specialty-And other good thi W to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 
Middle Street, ^ 4isW Had,e y , Mas. 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 




OSTSnfATHIC I'HYSHIAN 

305 LAMB1E BLOB., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone 



HI Y VOI'K 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

ete., of 

A. W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

! , .-all at the l.orm. and Fraternity House*. 



Northampton Players 

f his wee k "KINDLING 




SPEAKERS FOR WEEK 

, ;t . v i.uuis C. Oatalab hi to '"• ,he 
speaker iiMu-vt Sunday's ebapel «•*- 
r U. H.bwUeeD prominent lo law lo 

Maine, when he »« I ms.ee o < * J 

eolleg, and of tbe Cob«n« Cl.a-.ical 
Iwrtttato. Ha li ■« .I'-Horo, the 

A.neriean Unitarian association at 

Boston. . ., _ 

Brewer Eddy uf tht An.eru-a.. Pot- 

elp, Missionary society will sneak at 
Assemhly, Wednesday. S..v. 14. Mr 
Eddy is an author and a pastor and 
has hadmueh oxperienee alonu nussu.n- 

ary lines. _^________— 

GAMES FOR SATURDAY 

Intramural athletic* will he con- 
tinued next Saturday on the same Plan 
w iast week. Foothall tea* he we 
«be seniors and freshmen, and batWM 
tfc, juniors and sophomores will be 
lta|i"o.Ali»"l Field, and thetnter- 

oJm e. will he heldon the new track. 

The foothall lineups will heo-ntialh 
„,e same as, hose presented J**™** 
thtv . with. he exception of the suhst u- 
,ion of Davenport -20 and Casern *1 to 
Ma.-U.wl and 1,-avi... respective ly as 
the two latter were injured In the 
names last week. 

SENIOR PLAY COMMING 



The date of the Senior play has heen 

mi for Lecemher Rh. The show wdl 

,. linsi , „ mhI tulnstrel ****** 

solos, .."artets and several ske eh- 

,,,«. (omtnit.ee la arrntiRii.B •*« »* 
lnl „ rI11 al<ommi..c to have an informal 

on, ha, after, hts.iuu unttl H o clock 

The Informal Committee is negotiating 
with «he Dean, o, M,. iMyoke and 
Smith Collet to allow the a** to re- 
main until after the show. 

Uehcr,al> arc in ,ulUwi„« three, „ne, 

„ we ,. k Wednestay and rrida> aUjta 
nndoneiuhctwecn ,o he announced at 
,„,„„! rchersal. The following .,.m- 
«»«'«- arc in cha,uc : >.S. Smith. ■ ,au- 
mau:r.T. Smith, ,nua.r; R * "• 

newell, p. uing manager B. Uu 

: ,rdso„. tcsident manager; <>. <• L'»" 
;! r ,H,,reasurer:(». D Praii.nlaee mam. 

- - .j i ■ i • iiblletf v 

g«r and i». »■ "m"" 



WELCOME NEWS COMES 

FROM DR. ANDERSON 

The following is taken from a letter 

! fr in Mrs Fro'-, Anderson. It 
received Ui.ni .uis. i-i-- 

w„ written to her mother, and is dated 
I \u.m.s> 14, fow days after the accident. 
•We were in Bight of Table Mountain 
Friday afternoon, expecting to reach 
r ., ( p e Town abou, six o'clock when we 
.track"* floating mine. Ernest and 
were standing on the left side just 
u , | he stairway, looking at the strips of 
, l( . (( .h we could see when without any 
warning to any way there was a terrihle 
, .plosion. Before we could move there 
„as another on the other side. Thank 
UodldidnT lose my head. Ernest Jr.. 
was In the nursery and Frank was 
asleep in the cabin. We rushed for our 
cabin while Ernest got life preservers. 
1 p Ul on Ernest's overcoat and the 
bahv-s sweater. Fori una.ely 1 had on 
mv fur coat and hat, Ernest hut on 
Ernest Jr.'s life helt. I put on Ernest's 
Then he took Frank and Ernest and 
mi ,de for the upper deck. 1 grt n,y 

heii and grabbed my green ©oat, Fran* ■ 
t .„ a , and a blanket. I had two sull 
easea ready and .Ernest wouldn't let me 
take them. Ulerward I could see 
»herc wasn't room in, he hoat for them. 
If I had only opened mine and grabbed 
m v nurse! Within twelve minutes at 
ter.be was struck all seven boats WW 
launched. There was no pan..-. Our 
t . r ew of Lascar Indians worked as well 
as could he expected. The accident 
happened exactly at HO in the af-er- 
„,„,„ There is a lookout stationed on 
Signal Hill. Fortunately the officer was 
'„„ duty and watching us through power- 
ful glasses. We were only r SO miles out. 
\ iu«'t*aa entering the harl-.r and he 
„,.,,, i wireless, ha, he thoui»ht a Alp 
wait la distreaaaad for then to go and 
Investigate, our wireless went at the 
first explosion so .here was no chance 
)ol . a message for help. ThCm hunted 
HU .even o'clock, hut being low and 
,„„.,. oat* very small they did no, see us. 
Th,. v were Uirnimr back to town when 
,h,. first hoa, sent up a red distress sig- 
>t j We .prickly followed with our* u 
,,„,,,„. other boats. We had sighted 
,he..i« hrfonruatk and ! 



Russell. Bnrdsall & Ward Bolt and M Co. 

1 ~ U9W vnuK 



KAPPA GAMMA PHI FLAG 

AnotherseryiccHautK- appeared on 
,hc campus Kappa «.amma I h. ban 
,„„.„„* with sixteen stars In it I H 
Us,o, meni»th«-rvH.ts-folh.ws. 

Herbert W, Walkden. A>.r. 
U ,„rv M. Walker, Ayer: «»H"« 1 « -■ 
" [' mi WaltcrA.Mack.hieut.l 
r \ -C. Henrv llau'eWein, l.-ettt. U. 
',;' ' ,- Uowland W. Hosiers. I -.8. 
jbiv. <'.r,,s; Fred C Larson. M. A: 
W H^;nrdinc, C, fcl^* 1 '' 
W |«-A.W. Spencer. lA-i*"** 
Gilligan, V. A. Mark A.lloherts IB. 
has joined the national army s.nce the 
flag was ordered, so one more star wll 
soon he added. 

SOPHOMORE BLBCTI0S1 



PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 

WPABU.HW* IMS 



MaKer«of 
Tke Celebrated 



MP IB, 



ITS and 
NUTS 






Carpenter St Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amhent, Man. 



A, a „,phomore class meeting held 
Wednesday eveninu, net. :t. in the Bo- 
,.,al Inion.the following officers were 
p'wiedf.'r the year: 

prudent, 1-hlllP S. Newell of 
Newton; vice-president , !-.«■«/.. h ^ 
of U.well; secretary. Earl >»«-'" 
ul West Bridgewater; treasurer. . Inhn 
K( arie,o„ of East Sandwich: captain 
,. ( „dou H. Craft, of Manchester; ser- 
U( , t n.-a.-arms, Wane, M. OewToj rt 
Kingston; historian, Hobertl'.tande of 

PHtslield. m 

Followinutbcelec.iouofclassoffieers 

t arl F. t^raves was electe.l manager of 
the iix man rope pull team. 



the tog uaiuiwu—- -» • 

Us smoke looked. The it "cares! the 

Wg began to shout, hu, they evidently 

misunderst I their cries and thinking 

,„.„ boat all right they sheered of, for 
,he hoat fartherest away. This h»a« 
mitiiVluim tely was then almost full of 
wa t#T ami at exactly 7-* e»psi?.ed, Hi Dg- 
i„g forty people into the wales. Three 
umes after .hat the hoa, turned tur.le. 
Ull lv for the fact that the life boats are 
unsinkahle even when foil «l ! water 
weTi the few people in it saved. Fifteen 
passenger, and four of the crew were 
drowned. Two whole families were 
teat, a young man from Virginia, and 
, he rest were 8. A. people, our hoa, 
was the tilth to he taken on the tug 
They gave us immediately ho, tea and 
er-ickcrs. We were six hours in the 
Mm.ll beats. Ahou.lO-WUhe searchers 
found the waterlogged hoat and .p.ickly 
liruiiuhl on hoard the seven survivors, 
„f whom two were women. Then we 
( , ium , directly to cape Town and were 
transferred to the Hoya! Mail .Steamer, 
k .Hen coffee and sandwiches and put to 
1„.,1 It wp then after two so we didu t 
sh-epihat night, A. the slightest noise 
I would sit up expecting the explosion. 
o' i> was awful! And we were fortu- 
„.„„ wears all here. Of course we 
,„., ,. Vf .,v,hinK. n.oney. clothes, pass- 
porti. The He E istrarof I he S. A fob 
lege met us Saturday morniim and told 
„h,o draw on the college for money. 
They also furnished tickets to Pretoria. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 

inu.tnyu.i ol iiv .j *l> 

"dead one." 



Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO., &£*ST 




THE 



United States Hotel 

Heaeb, Lincoln and Klnustnn Ht» . 
BOSTON, flASS. 



Onl> two blocks from South Terminal Hta 
lion, and easily readied from North Station 
by Klevat.il Huilway. and convenient alike 
to the great retail alioim and l»u»iiieg» eentre, 
also to the theatres and place* of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 



us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 



PLEASANT 

Just before you enter the campus 




THIS "WARNING SIGNAL" 

INSURES PROPER SPEED 



N' 



SE people out of ten turo the MpfentOf 
handle too slowly, eaa*ins a big cream 



>in h < rem )..*•>.•- an- avoided with tfN 
New i ic i,a\ai. The Bell Speed Indicator i» 
a "warning siifnal" tbatinsurw propsrtr*«d 
at all time*. I'h it one feature alone nay 
easily save the eevt of a separatoir In a few 
months. 

i tt her advantages of the New I »■■ Laval are 
greater capacity, closer »ki m mi n« and ea«ler 
turning, simpler bBWl ennstniction and 
•aaler washing. 

High-grade eoBstrnction and design. tr»- 
gether with perfect automatic lubrication. 
ars a guarantee of durability and nMttnfai 
t«ry service. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



185 Broadway 
HEW TORE 



m K. MaimsomRt. 
( TIICAW) 



A inerchan, here, Mr. Middlemost, gave 
us credit at his Mora and went to four 
oilier stores, giving Us orders ,o net 
what we needed and charge it I" him. 
We were asked out to two of the pas- 
sengers homes and went to one. The 
stewardens (on our boat) worked like a 
man. A wonderful woman she is. She 
is still in the hospital. One man on the 
last boa, is seriously ill in the hospital: 
one other at his home. The two women 
are in one of the passenger's homes rest- 
in" I here. Mails are very uncertain so 
months may n<> hj with no news of us. 
but don't worry "no news is good news." 



POM. CLUB NEXT 

There has been some talk around I lie 
campus of forming a Pomology Club. 
This was Instigated h> the announce- 
ment 'hat an Animal Husbandry Club 
was to he formed, Profeaaor Scars says 
thai he will do all in his power to make 
it a success. There are more men ma- 
jorinir in this subject now than in 
other subject* which have had clubs 
formed in their honor. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Ex-'l>7. -Herbert II. Green was mar- 
ried to Florence L, Knapp, Oct. Ill, in 
Worcester, They will he at home after 
the lirst of January al Spencer. 

'14. — Bennett A. I'oiter who has been 

in government service in Connection! 
this year is spending a ten days' vaca- 
tion at the home of his wile's parents at 
North Hadley before leaving lot Wash- 
ington, 1). < .. where be will lake a posi- 
tion in (he Bureau of Kntomo logy under 
the I. S. 1). A. 

'hi. -Willioin L. Dona at present of 
the botany department ftl the New 
Hampshire state collage is spending 
several days on the campus engaged in 
botanv work oi s research nature. 



INTERGLASS FOOTBALL 

[Continued from page 1 



After (his '20 made a desperale effort to 
score by a series of forwards. Sweeny 
threw three pretty pastes which carried 
them lo the 10-yard line. From here be 
attempted another but this was uncom- 
pleted and counted as a touehback for 
the 1990 men. There was no more scor- 
ing on either side. 
The score: 

1990. 

le. Carlton 

It, Sullivan 

Ig, Davenport, Uemlio 

e, Dwyer 

rg. Bunker 

it. MacLeod, Dagget 

re, Lothrop 

rub, Jakeman, tirav 

Ibb. Hall, II. ud 

fb, Cande, Cap' . 

qb, Sweeney 

BOWa 191S 1». 10'iO 0. Touchdowns 

Goodwill 2. liiehardsoii. lloals from 

touchdown— Carter. Referee — Dole, 
Linesmen S, S, Smith. Richards, Timer 
— Hicks. Iiupiic Kennedy of Am- 
herst. Periods— Two 12-miiiutt- and two 
Ki-ininule. 



lots, 

Babbitt, re 
Cotton, rt 
Boyd, rg 

'Til ton, c 
Kdes, lg 
Carter, It 
l/ipshircs, b- 
Richardson, rhh 

Chiipmhu, Ihb 
(ioodwiti Cap, ., fb 
Ilunnewcll. <|b 



11*21, 

le. Whittle 
It, Hice 
lg, Brigham 
e, Mackiutimh 
rir, ttottld 
rt, Ames 
re, Casi'lo 
rhh. MaeCorraaek, ('apt. 
Ihb, l.eavilt 
Peterson, Park h urst . fb fb. Miller 

I Whittle ('apt., qb qh, Anderson 

Score — 1919 19, I l»*2t 0. 'ToticlnloWlis 
I — Mansell 2, Whittle. Kicked goal from 
I tOUebdoWng— ROM 1. Referee — Dole 
To. Linesmen — Stabbloa, Howe, Timer 
— Hicks. Umpire- Kennedy of Am- 
herst. Time of periods — 16 minutes. 



Mansell, re 
Blanrhard, ri 
Bagg, rg 
Road, 8 

Wood, lg 
Hoss, It 

ITaderwood, lc 

Williams, rhh 
While, Ihb 



FRESHMEN 



Start your college year right. Buy your 
clothes and haberdashery where you can 
buy it to the best advantage — where you can 
rind the largest variety and best merchan- 
dise made in the best styles at fair prices. 



Sheepskin Lined Coats, 
Sheepskin Lined Ulsters, 
Snappy Top (oats, 
Reversible Collared Shirts, 



$6.50 to $10 

$13 to $24 

$12 to $30 

$1.50 to $5 



Suits in Every Style and Price 

Guyer Hats 

Manhattan Shirts 

Altaian Cravats 

Oakes Sweaters 

Interwoven and Holeproof Sox 




Ou»;rlcht Bart 8ch«fln«r * Man 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

ll.-ii-i Holififfiier <v Mtirx Cluttiea 



I 



School ana College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY; 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



i Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

Write lo^liiy ft*** prlooa oam 



P^b^b-b 







I Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 Th ' ■««••»«" Farmeri* SUndarS fer tUty Tsars 1917 

Ask For Our Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents In Unoccupied Territory 



o 



,X. I« H-« ■ —•» Aui-iH-y Moioiui-i- 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Hiitwiiliary of IS# A infill im Anilcuitioul ("hewtcml lo, 

51 CHAMBERS STREET - - - NEW YORK CITY 



ers^n-r' 



/ 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917. 



/ 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

[Continued from iiaice 8 J 



Once or twice a day we have "Aban- 
don .Ship" drills when the life boats arc 
manned and the men on 8 deck go to 
tlirir positions beside of their life rails 
while those from 4 deck assemble in the 
mess ttal 1 on 2 deck. In ease we are hit 
by a torpedo and are compelled to leave 
the ship 1 have charge of a life raft with 
fourteen men on it. 

Must close now as we are going up the 
harbor of some American pott now and 
I am noinn to try to get this mailed by a 
sailor. Kxpeet to start back soon. 

CaaitLKs Fii \skk 'in. 



21, Kl'K K.UMM AHI), 

Park*, Pbanck. 



We arrived in Bordeaux last Satur- 
day, and I have been here in Paris ever 
since. All the fellows thai came the 
same time I did have left for I lie train- 
ing camps, but 1 had lo wait for some 
baggage that go! lost. However. 1 had 
a letter today about it and it is coming 
tonight. 

This estate here is a very obi one, and 
is certainly wonderful. It is lincly 
laid out, (on a hillside) with the house 
at the top and gardens extending down- 
ward. There Is an old range here 
backed up against the wall, and it is, or 
rather used to be, heated by Hues in the 
masonry. Benjamin Franklin lived 
here when he was in Paris. It is cer- 
tainly great here. Paris is a wonder- 
fully beautiful city. All that 1 don't 
like about it is that one cannot abso- 
lutely go out at night without being 
picked up by at least 40 "kites."' 

Last Sunday 1 went out to the Louis 
A1V palace at Versailles, where itie 
most famous gardens in the world are. 
Ksen there, as an example of the in- 
tensecultivation of every foot of ground, 
the flower beds were laid out with 
beans, etc. 

1 expect to leave here Friday for 10 
days in a training camp a few miles 
back of I he line. By the lime you get 
this I will probably be in it with a 
Pierce Arrow truck. 

I am trying to write this sitting on 
the step of-e-a r bw agka— twe-la Ptr*f, 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



and as you see it is a rather poor place 
to write. 

My French is picking up wonderfully. 
Last night 1 went down the street a 
ways and got dinner all alone. I had 
quite a time making them understand 
what 1 wanted, but 1 got it after a while 
all right. 

The French people are very cordial 
to us and are always very willing to 
help us in any way. 

Most sincerely yours, 

KofiKIIS Cl AIM" 1H. 



ocolates, Pudges, Caramels 
and a Large Line of 
Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 



At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT- 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on luteruol. Athletics, 
M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 
Non-Athletic Association, 11 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M . A. C, Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee. 



FORM AN. HUS. CLUB 

At a meeting held after chapel Mon- 
day a new professional club was added 
to the numerous ones of college. The 
new organization Is for men majoring of 
interested in animal husbandry. While 
other major subjects have had their 
clubs for the benefit of men specializing 
In a line of work, there has never been 
one devoted to animal husbandry. Men 
majoring in this subject met for the 
tor mat ion of the new club and the fol- 
lowing officers Wirt elected: President, 
W.A, Foley '18; vice-president, E. M. 
ButTiin *lf; secretary, 1>. A. Boss 'IB, 
treasurer, 0, O, Mat-toon "19. A com- 
mute* was appointed to draw up a con- 
stitution and by-laws. It is planned to 
have members of the faculty and others 
for speakers at each meeting. 



Telephone 

C. A. Peters, Secretary — 454-W 

II. M. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403-M 

E. Robbins, Manager — res. 62-VV 

L. T. Buckman, Piesident — 416 

J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 

K. 1). Hawtey, Manager— »>M 

<>. S. Flint, Manager— o44-M 

W. S. Sawyer, Manager— .*»4.'l 

L. N. OdamB* Manager— 203-M 

S. F. Tuthill, President— 416 

A. F. Williams, Manager— 8364 

1). M. I.ipshires, Manager— 416 

K. L. Messenger, Manager— 8347 

K. M. BtifTum, Manager— 8H64 

1). O. Merrill, President— 4 1 6 

J. H. Day, President— 8377 

H. L. Russell,* President— 11 9-R 

W. Hurlburt, President— 4*24-M 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 7-20, X 10, 
9 10, 10-20, and at 20 minutes past the 
hour until n-20 P. M. 

CARS 

Leave Amherst for M. A.C. at 605.625, 
7-00,7-30,800,8-15,9.15,930, 10 15, 10-30, 
11-15. 11-30, 12-30, 12-45, '-3°' '-45 and at 
45 minutes past the how up to 9-45, and 
at 10-30 and 1 1 00 r». M. 
Last car at 12-30 A. «. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Hates 



mm mcerais 




£%TISfi HiESSiM 



High-Grade College Work 

Shirts, - LM*fl 

collars, - - - - 'i Le- 

ctins, - - a i-m 

Plain Wash, per do/., 4He 

Same, rough dry. per do/., HOC 



Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

Hteaia Pressing 4tV, - a suits for ii. 00 
Dry f Meaning and Pressing, §1,50 a Suit 



All bills puraltle at «"n-op. rttm-e and wesl* 
teft there will receive prompt att«ntio». 



G. K. Babbitt' 1 7, Alpha Sigma Phi House; F. E.CoLt f JR, , 2o, College Store 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Scats' Kurnisliings Ticket System 

11 amity street 

The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfield*, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml, alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
'•Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage node rn 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System Freight and Ex- 
press Service over enti re II ne . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 





Vol. XXVIII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 13, 1917. 



No. 5 



UPPER CLASSES EASILY 
WIN FO OTBALL V ICTORIES 

Seniors Run Up 34-0 Score. Juniors 

Whitewash Sophomores 27-0. 

Good Team Work. 

The upper classes m( ill continued tu 
show their supremacy over the lower 
classes by defeating t hem ill the second 
series of intramural football at Alumni 
Held on .Saturday. Their victories were 
decisive as was shown by the scores: 
1918 84, 1921 0, 1H1M 27, 1H20 0. 

The opener was betweeu the seniors 
and freshmen. This was an entirely 
one-sided affair the Seniors making tirst 
downs many times on only one rush. 
The experienced men ou the 1W18 team 
were responsible for the team's good 
work and although the freshmen bad 
some lone brilliant stars in Mackintosh 
and McCormack their good playing went 
for naught. 

The seniors made live touchdowns, two 
being made by their ends Lips hi res and 
Kabbitt ami the other three being made 
by brilliant rushing and end skirting by 
the back field. Carter kicked four goals 
in rive trys bringing the score up to 34 
while the freshmeu had to lie content 
with a goose egg. 

The score : 

1918. 

Lipshires. le 
Carter, It 
Kdes, lg 
Tilton, c 

Boyd, rg 

Cotton, rt 

TUhhttjff* 



Uunnewell, qb 
Richardson, Ibb 

Chapman. I bb 

Goodwin, fb 



19*21. 

re, Casein, Howen 
rt, G. Klce 

lg, Cull 111 

c, Mackintosh 

lg, llrigham 

It, A iin-s 

i.. it i Bee 

qb, Anderson 

l lil'. M.< i. n n a. :M 

Ihb, Long 
fb. Miller 

Score— 1918 84, 1921 0. Touchdowns— 
Lipshires. Kabbitt, Uoodwiu. Chapman, 
ilunnewell. Goals from touchdowns— 
Carter 4. Referee - Dole. Umpire — 
Kennedy. Linesmen Sawyer, Freinh. 
Timer— Chapman. Time Four 10-min- 

Mt i- pel mils. 

The juniors once more defeated their 
old rivals the sophomores at loot ball on 
Saturday by the score of 27 to 0. Whit- 
tle the varsity quarterback and captain 
of the iiineiceii-iiincteeii team piloted 
Ins men in a masterly fashion. The 
small score of the juniors does not indi- 
cate their entire strength fur in the last 
half the team was mostly composed of 
the subs. 

I he juniors received the lirst kick-off 
and before a few minutes of play was up 
t In y bad cruised I he 1MB goal line for a 
touchdown. lions then kicked a goal 
making the score 7 lo 0. The juniors, 
not satisfied with this score, crossed the 
Sophomores* goal line three times be- 
fore the half was up. 

Whittle made some startling quarter* 
back runs while Williams the stellar 1919 
halfback proved to be a hard man for 
|< on tinned an mt* • ! 



TOTALS IN AGGIE Y. M. C. A. WAR FUND 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

Men Students $3,678 05 

Women Students 346 25 

Faculty 1,743 00 

Clerks 300 00 

Graduate Students 70 00 

M iscellaneous 25 00 

Total $6,165 30 

Over $1,000 00 already paid. 

Pledges may be paid to Treas. Hall B. Carpenter '10 at any time. 
Tn.3 T. M. C. A. Office will b* open for payments from 12-30 to 1-30 
and fr >m 6.00 to 7.00 o'clock daily. 



NOTED FOOD CHEMIST TO 
SPEAK IN ASSEMBLY NOV. 21 



Dr. Harvey Wiley to Address Student 

Body on Some Phase of 

Chemistry. 

The speaker for the Wednesday as- 
sembly, Nov. 21, will be Dr. Harvey W. 
Wiley of Washington, I). C. Dr. Wiley 
was born in Kent, 1ml in 1H44. He 
went lo the Hanover (lmJ.) college where 
be obtained the degree of A. H. In 18o7 
and A. M. in 1N70. He also attended 
i be Indiana Medical college, where he 
received the degree of M. D, in 1871 and 
at Harvard university, he was awarded 
the K. S. degree in 1873. Since then 
the following honorary degrees have 
been awarded him : I'b. I), from Hano- 
over in 187d, LL. D. from Hanover in 
1M9*. LL. D. from the I'liiversity of Ver- 
mont in 1911. and D. Sc. from Lafayette 
In 1912. During his younger years Dr. 
Wiley held many important positions 
as instructor In the subjects of medicine 
ami chemistiy. He has represented 
the Ciiited Mates in all parts of the 
world In various congresses ami eonler- 
eiices pertaining to chemistry and med- 
icine. His writings have been Confined 
chiefly lo agriculture, pure food and 
chemistry. Since 1912 Dr. Wiley has 
been a contributing editor to the Howl 
tiotUteketpiHg magazine. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

At the Sunday chapel exercises Nov. 
18, William Wallace Fenn. Dean of the 
Harvard Theological school, will give 
the address. Dean Fenn was born In 
Boston in l*fl2 and attended Harvard 
ruivcrslty. He received there the 
ttSglBM "I V I*. i» !"**•». A. K, in 1K87, 
and S. T. H. in 1x87. He was ordained 
as a Cuitarlan minister in 1887, Since 
then he has officiated as pastor of several 
of the most prominent Unitarian 
churches in the United States. He ac- 
cepted the position of Bussey professor 
of theology at Harvard in 1901. Since 
1906 be has been Dean of the Harvard 
school of theology. As an author. Dean 
Fenn has been foremost in the religions 
lit .rat ore of the I i me. 



SOCIAL UNION ANNOUNCES 
PROGRAM FOR COMING YEAR 

John Kendrick Bangs and Lotus Male 

Quartet Included in Schedule. 

Prof. Patterson to Speak. 

The Social Union Committee of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College an- 
nounces the following program for the 
coming winter season : 
I).. . *., Friday— Reno B. Welbourn, Set- 

.in i- Demonstrator, 
Dec. 15, Saturday— Illustrated Lecture, 

"The Southwest." 
Jan. 5, Saturday— John Kendrick bangs. 
Jan. 18. Friday— The Apollo (Quartet 

and Header. 
Feb. 2, Saturday— Prof. C. II. Patterson, 

Reader. 
Feb. 17, Sunday— Ralph Havens, Pianist. 
Mff r a - Saturday - Ralph Bingham, 

Humorist. 
Mar, '.<. Saturday— The Featberstone 

Musical Company. 
Mar. 17, Sunday— Alfred Holy Trio, Boa- 
ton Symphony. 
Mar. 23, Saturday— Student Vaudeville. 
The committee, in deciding upon Its 
program, felt that It is especially desir- 
able this year to present an unusually 
attractive program. With the speeding 
up of college work, the necessity of sup- 
plying attractive entertainments la 
greater than under ordinary circum- 
stances. 

It is hoped that members of I be fac- 
ulty will appreciate the opportunities 
offered by this program, and will lend 
their support to even a larger degree 
than in former years. 



FORM POMOLOGY CLUB 
And still another club is added lo 
the already large number In college. 
The new organization is the Pomology 
club which was formed by the many men 
majoring In this subject, Officers were 
elected at the first meeting, president, 
(). Q.Pratt '18; vice-president, P, Faxon 
•If; secretary and treasurer, L. D. 
Peterson *19, 

QulBcy A. Bagg '19 of South Hadley 
has pledged Alpha Sigma Phi. 



NINETEEN-NINETEEN WINS 
INTERCLASS TRACK MEET 

Sophomores Close Behind. Fresh- 
men and Seniors Outclassed. 
Hansen Wins in Hurdles. 

Favored by ideal weather conditions, 
and with competition keen in every 
event, the ititrirhiss track meet was 
held last Saturday on Alumni Field. 
The Juniors won the meet, with the 
Sophomores second. Freshman third, 
unclassified students fourth, and Sen- 
iors Hfth, the contest between l'.M'.i and 
1920 being so close that the winners 
of the meet were in doubt until the final 
event. 

The largest point winner was Hanson, 
unelassilied, with Id points. Dewing 
and Callahan with 11 each were tied for 
second largest. letter men were al- 
lowed to run iu only one race. 

Owing to the large number of entries 
in the 2U0 and 220-yaid dashes, and 120- 
yard high hurdles, and 220-yards low 
hurdles, these events were run off in 
heats. 

The mile run was the Juniors' event 
all Ihe way. Sweeney went inlo the 
lead at the start and held it until the 
last lap, when UoiT dosed in and passed 
him, winning by a few feet. 

Hanson won the 220-yard hurdles 
by inches, breasting the tape barely 
aload of Newell '20, in a hard fought 
race. 

The two mile run, as In last Satur- 
day's meet, was a good race. iJoff *1W, 
took the lead at the gun ami held It by 

.• 1 , ,. i .11 . I... I... . <-... » llM 

,l rniKil* II. ..•„... ■ . - ., , "» r J 

Lyons '20, who bad gone into second 
place on Ibe second lap, passed blm by 
a well limed sprint, and won by a few 
feet. 

The finish of the 220-yard dash was 
close, Batchebler '10. winning from 
Pree and Harrington by a close margin, 

The Junior relay team, Parkbursi. 
Sweeney, Free and Baicbelder, won 
handily, their lead acquired in the Ant 
two laps proving too much of a handi- 
cap for t he Sophomores. 

100-yard dash — First, Dewing 'SO; 
second, Callahan '19; third, Coderre It; 
fourth, Hanson, unclassified. Time— 
10 2-5 seconds. 

Mile run- First, (ioff '19; second. 
Sweeney '19; third, West "21; fourth. 
Howe *19. Time— fl minutes. 12 sec- 
onda. 

220-yard low hurdles— First, Hanson, 
unclassified ; second, Newell *20; third, 
Armstrong *20; fourth, Callanau '19. 
Time— 30 minutes. 

High jump- First, Callanan 'IB; sec- 
ond, Dewing f 30} third, Fogg UK; 
fourth, Urout *S0 sod Armstrong '20. 
Height — 4 feet 11 Inches, 

120-yard high hurdles — First, Han- 
son, unclassified; second, Lent '20: 
third, Armstrong '20; fourth, Newell 
'20— Time, 20 3-5 seconds. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



/ 



/ 



440-yard dash— First, Yesaii 'li»; sec- 
ond, Prt*u MM: third, Harrington '20; 
fourth, McCarthy '21. Time- 68 sec- 
ondw. 

Pole vault — First, Spencer '20; sec- 
ond, Dean '21; third, Alger '21; fourth, 
Lenl '20. Uciirht— 8 feet, 2 inches. 

Two mile run — First, Lyons '20; sec- 
ond, (Joll'li); third, Sweeney 19; fourth, 
Ballet '21. Time— 11 minutes, 17 sec- 
onds. 

Discus throw— First, Carlson 'IS; sec- 
ond; Kroek '21; third, Lent '20; fourth, 
llartwell '10. Distance, 01 feet, inches, 

880-yard run — B*irst, Carpenter '19; 
sic. ml, Dewing '20; third, West '21. 
Time -2 minutes, i( 2-5 seconds. 

Shot put— First, Kroek '21; second, 
Newell '20: third, Carlson 18; fourth, 
llartwell TO. Distance— 34 feet, in- 
ches. 

330-yard dash— First. Hatchelder TO; 
sici.nd, Free 10; third, Harrington '20; 
foui tli, Kent '20. Time — 25 seconds. 

Broad jump — First, Hanson unclas- 
sified: second, McCarthy '21; third, Cal- 
lanan 10; fourth, Grout , '20. Distance— 
18 fed. 

one mile relay— First, 1010, (I'ark- 
hursl, Sweeney, Pree, Batchelder,) 
seci.nd, 1980 (Newell, Wright, Harring- 
ton, Lyons ; third, 1021, (Allen, Hallet, 
W.st. McCarthy.) 

Class scores : 

1010—57 point* 
1920—48 

l'.fJl 24 " 

I'mlassilied-lO 

1018 7 " 
Individual scores: 

Points. 

Hanson (unclassified) 16 

Callanan TO 11 

Dewing '20 11 

Gaff '10 8 

Kroek .21 8 

Carls.. n 'IS 7 

Lent "20 7 

Newell 'SO 7 

Free l!» « 

Sweeney T'.» 5 

V.sairTO 5 

Carpenter *n» 5 

Batchelder 10 5 

Lyons '20 5 

Spencer '00 5 

A rmstirmK^'S© — 44 

Harrington '90 

McCarthy '21 

West 21 

Dean '21 

Coderre U» 

Fogg T9 

llartwell Ti» 

AJger '21 

Howe TO 

Mallet '21 

Grout '20 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
froul.] 

Otb Company, New England Division, 

Plattsburg, N. Y. 



STUDENT FORUM 

Tbe first student forum of the year 
was held at assembly last Wednesday. 
After a few general remarks by Rojwell 
'IK, regarding student conduct, Lan- 
phear'18, president of Adelphla, took 
charge, The dining hall question was 
discussed by Batchelder '19, Faxon T9 
and Smith '20. Lack of class enthusi- 
asm was commented upon by Lanphear. 
Richardson T8 gave bis views in the 
form of addressing each class regarding 
their attitudes of class spirit. Hunne- 
well T8, college cheer leader, led the 
assembly In a few cheers, and Qoff '19, 
leader of the Glee Club, led a few of tbe 
eol legs songs. 

Hoy H. Brown '20 of Hudson and Al- 
fred Clough '20 of Quincy have both 
pledged Tbela Chi. 



Guess you must be wondering about 
this lime whether or not I have "kicked 
out." 1 assure you that I am still on 
tbe map, alive and kicking; mostly 
about tbe lack of beat in our barracks. 
Just now I am in the Y. M. C. A. just 
following tbe 7-30 service which I make 
it a practice to attend. 

Just think, the camp Is nearly half 
over and since the last weeks will slip 
along faster thau the first, it won't be 
long before I bit Amherst, either to 
stay or for a couple of days. The effic- 
iency list, published last week at Regi- 
mental headquarters, puts me among 
tbe tirst 25 in my company, but I'll 
have to work some to stay there. 

You doubtless read in the papers that 
we were digging a system of trenches 
the like of which have never been seen 
In this country. We dug them, or 
rather got them half done, week before 
last, aud I understand that next week 
we go back to finish up and use them in 
maneuvers. Our company was desig- 
nated as a special machine gun com- 
pany, and since, "whenever practicable, 
soldiers should dig the trenches they 
occupy," we dug all the machine gun 
emplacements. 1 was a sergeant in 
charge of 18 men and got quite a bit of 
experience. One of the senior captains 
came around, made some remarks re- 
specting tbe job, and then asked 
who was the boss. I answered and he 
said "That's right. You're a boss, all 
right. You've got your shirt and hat 
on. Let's see your hands." They were 
all pitch from handling pine posts, 
"oh, you're no boss ai all. You're as 
bad as I am." Seeing that be partici- 
pated in the Boxer uprising, has seen 
service in the Philippines and was in 
command of tbe rear guard coming out 
of Mexico, I was perfectly contented to 
be characterized as "bad" as be. 

Hablas Wobthlky '18. 



Camp Devens, Nov. 8, 1917. 

This place might be a lot worse than 
it is, also It might be better. It is 
pretty cold here now, especially night 
aud morning, as there is not the least 
sign of any heat in the barracks. There 
is no hot water for bathing, nor even a 
pint for a shave. But cheer up, they 
say we are going South very soon. 

The best feature of this camp is tbe 
Y. M, C, A. Believe me, 1 shall never 
again pass any uncompleraeatary re- 
marks about the Y. M . C, A, Some of 
its members may be "semi-women", but 
take it from me, this camp would be a 
bell of a hole without them. They 
furnish a n<ce warm place to read or 
write, also lectures and free movies in 
the Y. M. C. A. auditorium every night 
there is a 50 cent show for a dime. In 
addition they furnish free writing ma- 
terial. They are the soldiers friend in 
every possible way. 

It may interest you to know that there 
are quite a few Aggie men here at Ayer. 
I have met many of them. They range 
in rank all the way from captain down 
to privates. A great many of those who 
were drafted have become either cor- 
porals or sergeants through their 
knowledge of the I, D. B. gained at M. 
A, C, Others find it difficult to gain 
recognition on account of tbe fact that 
if men who have been in the service 



LOST! 



Everybody doesn't read the 
bulletin board in North College, 
but everybody does read the 
"Collegian." Don't you think 
45 cents spent for a i-inch inser- 
tion tor an issue is worth while 
when you can bring your loss 
before the eyes of everyone? 
See the advertising manager. 



H. L. KI'SHKI.L. Mur.. MS 
E. M. BUFKUM, 'IB 



R. B, COLLI NB. 1« 
F. E COLE. '20 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 

Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



SPECIAL SALE FOR ONE WEEK 
Columbia Scratch Pads, 8 1-2 in. by 5 in., - - 4 cents, 3 for 10c 

Looh ever the new College Seals, 90 cents 



JBWBLBHS 

The £. £. Millett Estate 

A full line of College Jewelry always in stock 
Broken Lenses replaced while you wait 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



UNITY CHURCH 

Pmcabant Stbket. 
Regular Sunday Service at 10-45 A.M. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



There are Seven Good Reateas why you shea Id 
buy your 

COAL 
0. It ELDER 

COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk down town and create an appetite. 
Here It where yon And the pies mother makes. 

Clood Service and Reasonable Prices 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH ? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric GriU Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



The "Nonotuck* 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 

EUROPEAN 



RATES, SI. 50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Proms — Our Specialty. 



P. J. BEHAN 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



happen to be in the company with 
Aggie men, the former are given pref- 
erence, although in my estimation, are 
mostly ignorant, uneducated rougb- 
n.M-ks. who make very poor officers. - 

I have bo far had no complaint as 
regards hard work. I happen to be in 
the Depot Brigade, and we drill only 
about one-third of the time. But in 
the other branches, I guess 1 hey are 
pretty busy all daylong. 

If you wiBh a list of Aggie men here, 
let me know and will try to get one. I 
have put up on the Y. M. C. A. bulletin, 
a sheet for Aggie men to sign. I hope 
I can reach most of tbem this way. 

AllTIIUK VV. Sl'KNt'KH '18. 

Co. 1st Bat., 151st Depot Brigade. 



Camp Merritt, Tenafly, N ..!., Nov. 1,1917. 

I was glad to get the Coi.i.koian 
though I have not had time to read it all 
yet. Kor a week I wa& working with 
three others getting up the muster roll, 
tiresome work all day and some even- 
ings. I feel better since I got back in 
the ranks drilling again and getting 
Home exercise. I have a corporal's job. 
Each corporal has charge of three squads 
with two first class privates to help. 
What drilling we have bad is squads 
right, left and right ahout.overand over 
again, under bonehead no-coms; we 
engineers probably will get only enough 
drill to be able to march decently. 

The last few days we have been 
issued most of our equipment. This 
morning we had our first hike under 
pack -three blankets and a water bottle 
Md a mesa kit, for a starter. We have 
open-air trickle watersupply ; yesterday 
the company went to an officers* batb 
house in groups and got our first army 
bath here - I had one other in a hotel 
for 25 cents. The grub is pretty good, 
considering "you're in the army now." 
However, we hope to get started pretty 
soon. 

E. B. NKwrojf 'IB. 



R. O. T. C. Co. 12, Ft. Oglethorpe, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Tbe position of lieutenant is not one 
T6~l)eeTrvied""as a general rule; Ho~w^ 
ever, it is in several respects, for in tbe 
new warfare the lieutenant or, as more 
generally termed, the platoon leader, 
leads in the charge, and, as we are told, 
If hesueeeedfl incoming through with 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of WrongBt Irmt and Hra*a I'lpe, 
Valves and Fittings for Htesm, Witter anrl 
Oas, Asbestos and Magnesia Holler and IMi>e 
( oveilngi. Pine rnttoSNeieh. Mill Supplies 
Engineers and f'ontractnrs for Hteam and 
Hot Water Heating. Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems. Roller and Rnglne Connections. 

Holyoke, Mass. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

2 j Main Street, Masonic Building, 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Closed only from i A, M. to 4 A. M. 



his life in one charge be is made a cap- 
tain, and three such happenings make 
him a major. He no longer carries a 
saber aud no pack, but goes into battle 
equipped as an ordinary soldier. All of 
which you doubtless know. 

YeBterday we celebrated one of the 
chief events of our grilling life here. 
At 11-30 we quit the trenches for the 
last time while here. Some weeks ago 
we spent two days and one night in 
their cold, damp dreariness assimilating 
war conditions, with attacks through 
tbe night, so that there was no sleep to 
be had. That experience was in 'use If 
enough to make every one swear all 
kinds of unheard of oaths against tbe 
Kaiser, but this last experience of three 
days and two nights spent in a south- 
ern clime, where tbe weather, with a 
temperature of 30 degrees is colder than 
any zero weather I ever experienced in 
tbe north, was enough to make the 
most hardened creature heartily sick of 
the affair. 1 can hardly imagine bow 
trench life in Europe can be much 
worse and yet bring men out alive. 
Yet we all know it must be many times 
worse. 

My advice to any young man who 
contemplates eutering the service is to 
try bis best to get into the aereonautic 
branch. The reasons are many, but the 
outstanding ones are that the propor- 
tional casualties are less and that the 
life must be much more bearable. 

A week ago we returned from the 
range, where we spent a week. You 
will be pleased to hear that through 
the experience gained at college 1 was 
able to lead our company in the llnals 
by two points out of 50. I am goiug to 
try to get appointed for a course at the 
school of musketry. 

You would lautrh to see us having 
bayonet practice. Kvery day it is dif- 
ferent. We have an instructor fresh 
from the schools in Kugland, and every- 
thing has to be done on the double. 
He is a perfect likeness to Teddy, eye- 
glasses, leeth, and pep. "Around me 
double." "Back in formation on the 
double. 11 "Up the latrines and back, 
who will be the last man." And bo he 
keeps us on the jump from one thing to 
another. *'<io at that dummy." he 
bellows, "as though it were, a live, fat 
German. Tear his breakfast, make the 
blood spurt 15 feet at least," he 
screams. Then more quiety, "l)o you 
know, tbe best way to get him is to spit 
in his eye. A good, strong chew of 
tobacco will gel blin every time. Prac- 
tice it, it's great. Try and recall every 
one of those nasty, dirty tricks you 
tried to forget in football, and all the 
others you can run across," 

I suppose I could is<< on and tell many 
things that would be more or let* new, 
but I feel tbe call of my ¥. 8. K. strong 
upon me and must get my dosb Into It. 
"Fkitss" Um.k '15. 



"Somewhere In Kngland." 

Oct. 20, 1017. 



Arrived safely after a somewhat 
tedious voyage. For tbe most part, 
stormy weather was encountered and on 
two successive days extremely so. 
Many of tbe boys were sick, but as luck 
would have it, I came through without 
It, At for real excitement, there wasn't 
much to speak of. Our escort was very 
ample, and If there were any IT-boats 
about, they dared not show themselves. 
Only once was the danger signal blown, 
and as far as I can make out, the look- 
outs la the crew's nest were the only 
ones who knew what It was. In due 
time we arrived at and after a ■hort 

i CODtlaasd •■ pact «J 



Johnson Book Co. 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -:- 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of II ill man and Karnes Street h, three 
Mocks from the Union Depot, Is a modern hos- 
telry ronon the Kuropeun I'lan. It is just n step 
from Main Street, sway fnmi the not s a unit dust, 
and yet In the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and eoinfortatile. 
bavins a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
wttb batb (single) $1.50 and op. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated din- 
Ins room makes a meal a pleasant memory 
everything of the highest quality, well cooked 
and served In tbe best posaible manner 

Htay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
antlcliiate staying there again. Muslr every 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel. SpriniAeld. Mass. 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



Eats, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



Freshman Hats 



good service: 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



pOR 

* vrnr« 



forty years we have rendered faithful service. For forty 

yean we have tried lo make each year's service more nearly 

ideal. This untiring effort has built for us not only The World*! 

Large* Mail Order Seed Business, bul sl«o a World Wide 

reputation (or Efficiency and undisputed leadership. The 

Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual, the 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" k brightci and 

better than ever. It is mailed free. A postcard will bring n. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower*, 

Burpee Buildings Philadelphia 



F*aa;e f §* fi^tioe Store 

Largest Stock—Lowest Prices 
Expert Repnlrlny;-ne«t leather used 



JACKSON & OUTLEB 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



7 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



/ 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. LANPHKAR MS.Bdltor-ln-Chlef 
WEHI.KY ». SAWYER '18. Athletic Editor 



Associate Editors, 
akthi k n. bow en '19 

ELIOT M. Bl'KFUM '19 

ABTHIU L. (HANDLER M9 

MYRTON F. KVANB 



19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
BIROERR. ROSEQITIBT'18. Huiinew M»n»ger 
BAMDEL B. rSKBttS '19. AwisUnt M»n»ger 
(J. M. CAMPBELL'S). Advertt»lnirMana«er 
JAMES C. MAl'I.KH '». Circulation 

O. ALFRED SMITH "20. Circulation 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Btrger R. Rosequlst. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager an soon as possible. 



Entered aaaecond-clau matter at the Amherat 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Nov. 13. No. 5 



Sleep— a Disease 

Sleep is indeed a gentle thing. All 
greiit writers haves;ii»l M>. Shakespeare 
has written much about its soothing 
<|ii:»lities. And all of us who have ever 
been so fortunate as to iloze over some 
morning realize the subllmenesa of it 
all. But like every food thing there is 
a time and place for this slumber. 
Surely the classroom is not this place, 
either. But just as certain as winter is 
coming on, just so certain are we goine 
to hibernate like so many bears in each 
of our Harfses. We will sleep the good 
sleep and arouse our thoughts just in 
time to start for the next class— and an- 
oilier sliimberland. This has been true 
in years past. Tradition will again win, 
for this winter the same state promises 
to be true— in 1M17— the time of all 
Mmes when we should be speeding up 
our work, should be doing all in our 
power to keep the best health bodily 
and mentally. 



U'luit is the cause of so much sleepll- 
ness in classes? Can it be that thestu- 
dent body falls to get enough sleep dur- 
ing the night? Partly, perhaps, but 
not solely. Much of the trouble comes 
from the disgustingly poor ventilation 
in some of the class rooms. In a few 
places on the campus classes are held 
continually throughout the day. In 
one room a class of sixty, claiming every 
available chair, ia immediately followed 
by another even larger. New students, 
new profepsor, but the same hot, close 
sickening, sleepy air. Never a window 
opened, The lectures may be very 
good, the very things the men want, but 
they cannot overcome ihe drowsiness 
resulting from bad sir. It is a disease, 
a most disgusting disease, one which a 
student cannot control. Even men at- 
tending special meetings last year, 
county agenti from all over the state, 
ran up against the same proposition. 
Attending talks they have come hun- 
dreds of miles to hear, they too fell 
a sleep, prey to the same disease. It is 
serious when oonditlooi reach such a 
stale. There must be some remedy, 
assemblies and chapels present the 
same problem even to a larger extent, 
often over 50 per cent of the student 
body will sleep through a most Interest- 
ing talk. The lecturer must indeed be 
flattered to look down upon his audi- 
ence and see tbem all in dreamland. 
Who is to blame. 



A real live issue is this of proper 
classroom ventilation. Instead of 
spending so much time dickering over 
marks, low marks we might say, it 
might be well if the college staff got 
down to the roots of the matter and 
eradicated the cause of some of the fail- 
ures. They are not all due to the stu- 
pidity of the student, nor to lack of 
study. Some few are due to lost expla- 
nations in the classroom, lost through 
sickness, the sleeping sickness. Instead 
of being too concerned with cuts taken 
by students during illnes it might be 
well if the college staff could devise 
some means of ventilating a few of the 
rooms in the campus, thus purifying 
the seedbeds of cold, grip, etc. These 
are problems that confront the whole 
college when it comes to speeding lip 
work. Scholarship as a watchword and 
poor environment for studying as its 
running mate means only one thing — 
failure. 

Every member of the student body 
should take take it upon himself to see 
that every room is in a fit condition to 
attend a class in. If it is not so, he 
should have the priveledge of leaving 
that room. It ought to be the duty of 
every professor to thoroughly air each 
room after every class. If he has no 
recitation then 'he following period, he 
should air it out for the iMOnlog pro- 
fessor. Some few rooms on (he campus 
have a reputation for being "great 
places to sleep in." There is a cause. 
It must be Overcome if Auu'ie islorc;ich 
the good she has set out to attain this 
year. < .».,.. i health, clean thinking, 
hard work and high marks are combi- 
nations that will not mix with poor ven- 
tilation, close stuffy, sleepy, sickening 
air. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Second Lieutenant KUiott Henderson 
ex-'l7 is somewhere in France on active 
duty. 

Mason Ware '20 IT. S. Marine Corps, 
41st Company, Marine Barracks, Paris 
Island, South Carolina. 

Professor Sprague has been appointed 
Amherst representative of the Hamp- 
shire County Board for civilian Kollef. 

Prof, tieorge I. Farley of the Kxten- 
sion department spoke on Junior club 
work to the boys and girls of (iloucester 
last week. 

Prof. W. P. B. Lock wood was one of 
the speakers last Wednesday in New 
York City before Mayor Mitchell's com- 
mittee on the cost of milk production. 

Herbert L. Baker '18 is to leave col- 
lege the 38th of this month for Ohapaaa, 
Orients Cuba, were be is to enter the 
employ of the Cuban-American Sugar 
Co. as an analysisi . 

Professors C. .1. Lund and L F. Payne 
and Superintendent Fred Cockell of the 
Poultry department were speakers at a 
meeting of Amherst — Northampton 
Poultry associations held at Amherst 
high school. 

At a meeting of the freshman class, 
after chapel Friday, Robert I . Starkey 
of Fitch burn was elected captain of 
the freshman six man rope poll team, 
which is to pull against the sophomores 
next Saturday. 

"(Lick" Mali..,! 'SO, who for ihe past 
two weeks has been seriously ill at the 
college infirmary, is now able to resume 
his studies. He has just returned from 
a short visit to his parents. A peck of 
grapes was "Chick's" difficulty. 

F. C. chapin )«.' is one of the latest 
M, A. C. additions to Uncle Sam's army 
via draft. The rejection of men un- 
suitable for military service in cha pin's 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1017-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and arythicg else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will- will not— send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Collkoian, Am- 
herst, MasB., as soon as possible. 




Don't let them say that "your 
eyes are open but you're fast 
asleep"! 

Wide-awake ones buy Rogers 
Peet clothes, ioo per cent all- 
wool. 




THI8"WARNINC SIGNAL" 
INSURES PROPER SPEED 



N 



Everything men and boys wear 



«ah. cww-wu an 

Rogers Pert Company 



Hroadwa? 
at IStta St. 

Hi old war 
at Warren 



"Ths 

Four 

Corner* " 

NKW YORK CITY 



Broad war 
at 84th St. 

Fifth Ats. 
at 41st Bt. 



INK people out of ten turn the separator 
handle too slowly, causing- a big cream 

loss. 

Such rrearu losses are avoided with the 
New De Laval. The Bell Speed Indicator is 
a "warning atanal" that Insures proper speed 
at all time*. This one feature alone mar 
easily save the cost of a separator in a few 
months. 

Other advantages of the New l)e I^val are 
greater capacity, closer skim mini: and easier 
turning, simpler bowl construction and 
easier washing. 

High-grade construction and design, to- 
gether with perfect automatic lubrication, 
are s guarantee or durability and aatisfac- 
tory service. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



166 BROADWAV 
NKW YORK 



29 K. Madison St. 
CHICAOO 



Northa mpton Players 

"A Woman of No Importance" 



This Week 



THE DAVENPORT 

The unsurpassed eating house for "Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 

-Twss ttee headquarters for "t\ 

Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, Pleasant St. 



•* 



"BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Wafflaa 

Oar Specialty -And other good things total. 
MRS. l» W. STEBBINS, 

Hadley, Mast. 



Middle Street, 



Tel. 4«5-W 



S. S. HYDE 

jeweler emnd Optlolan 



13 Pleasant street 

Oculists* Prescriptions Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repair- 
ing Promptly and Skilfully Done. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



home town of Greenfield led to the 

drafting of additional men to till the 
quota. 

Nearly all of the young women stu- 
dents of the college were present ut a 
party given hy the I'hi Sigma Kappa 
fraternity, Saturday erasing. Miss 
Kennedy and Mr. ami Mrs. liieks were 
the chaperons. Music and dancing wt-w 
enjoyed hy those present. Kefrcsh- 
iii t- ii t - were served. 

The unclassified students of the col- 
lege aie now required by the senate to 

wear prescribed hut tons. These, worn 
in the coat lapel, are small with a letter 
1" on a red field. In this manner the 
unclassified men arc distinguished from 
the upper classmen, something of great 
assistance to the freshmen. 

James 1*. Davies 'lit is attending a 
six months' course of instruction at the 
government department of the I'niver- 
sity of Vermont, Burlington. Vt. ".lim" 
is on Ihe editorial board of Ihe Allt'rnnt- 
iuij Current*, the weekly news record ot 

Depot Company V, Signal Corps, Na- 
tional Army, which is featured in 
the University newspaper. 

Merrill I'. Warner 17 and Miss Kdilh 
11. Iluhhurd, DOtb of .Sunderland, wriv 
married at ihe Congregational church, 
Sunderland, on Wednesday evening. 

Oct. si. Harold U. IWekej '17 was bssi 
man. and PbilipS. Wbltnwre '15, Harry 

Stiles 17. Kenneth M. Williams 'li> 
acted as ushers. The groom is well 
known as last year's business manager 
of the Coil i i.i \n. After a shotl lour 
through Vermont anil Ni-w York, the 
collide expect to he at their new In.tiie 
in Sunderland. 



NEW ENGLAND COLLEGIANS 
VERY ACTIVE IN THE WAR 

Statistics show that nearly half the 
college students of \ew Knghind have 
taken Up some form of war service, 
either in the direct military service or in 

munitions work and other indirect ser- 
vice, out of the 30,000 studentt in the 
2ii New England Colleges, 6,948 joined 
ihe colors Immediate!} and :kmm> went 
into agriculture and other branches of 
war work making about M200 college 
men in ttie game. 

Dartmouth sent nearly one third of 
her student hody to her country's aid , 
while Vale and Harvard lost ahout 06 
percent of their mi m her I h rough enlisi- 

inetit. 83 percent of New England col- 
lege men enlisted Immediately. 

Of the Slate College men of New Eng- 
land H7 per cent volnntered for some war 

work, witli m.a.c. in the forefront, SM 

percent of M. A, C men having mobil- 
ised lor service. Naturally a good por- 
tion of these men were doing agricult- 
ural work since they were more tilted 
for such work. 
Although the undergraduates of 

technical schools were hettcr tilled for 

munitions, ami ship building work, in 

percent of them did not wail lo linish 
their training at school hut joined 
colors immediately. 



THE AIM 

After twenty-five years close business associalion with the best dresMd 
men in your college : 

To keep our lines of young men's togs so utterly smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing lhat we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart "trench" overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coat made, 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



SERVICE COMMITTEE 



To Consider All Question Concerning 
Men in Military Work 

A joint committee from the student 
hody and faculty has heen appointed lo 
consider Ihe question of a service Hag 
for the college; also all matter t earn- 
ing Aggie men in service. Kusscll *1H 
is chairman of Ihe general committee. 
Sub-committees are as follows: Com- 
mittee on gifts for men in niililar? 
work— Boyd '18 chair man. Mr. (Jreen. 
Miss Addilon 'IN, Mr. White, post-grad- 
uate, I). Smith 10, Hatchel.ler lit; coin- 
mittee on publication - l.anphear "18 
chairman, Prof. Bobbins and l»r. Peters; 
committee on correspondence— Hatch- 
elder 'IP- chairman. Dean Lewis. S. S. 

Clark '1», Boyd '1H, I). Smith 'JU: «i - 

ial committee on lists and service roll. 
list of wounded and dead, ele.— Miss 
Adidlon '18 ehsJrman, Mr. Watts. S. s. 
Clark *18 and Lanpbear 'in. 



Ihe 



FIRST NUMBER OF SQUIB 

The reveille number nf the Squib will 
will be onl Dec. 14. In spite of the 
fact that the editorial board is hard hit 
hy the war, tbe first issue promises lo 
be a snappy one. Negotiations are 
nnder way with Postmaster (ieueral 
Burleson for the privilege of having the 
copies sent to Prance after tbe students 
are through with them. 

Of last year's board tbe following 
men are back: editorial staff, Piewon 
•10; art staff— Banker 'W, Webster "M; 
business staff— Ferriss *1», Martin 20, 
Douglass 'S4Q, 

Competition for new places on the 
hoard begins this week. There are six 
places open in the editorial department, 
two in the art department and two on 
the business siatT. These are open to 
all classes and it il hoped that a large 
number will compete, 



AGE REQUIREMENT CHANGED 

More Agitie men are eleglbls for the 
third officers' training camp because of 
the change in the minimum tgS limit 
from 21 years to 20 years and months 
mi or before Jan. r>, l»ln. 

This change in requirements was an- 
nounced at Ihe regular Wednesday drill 
period Nov. 7. Until Dec. 1, all Aggie 
men who come within the age limit 
may take out tbe necessary application 

papers ai tbe comandaat's ottos in the 

Drill Hall. These men must lake the 
required physics! examination under 
some doctor, and later go before army 
examiners fortinal examination. These 

examiners will ptobably meet all Aggie 
applicants together at Amherst. 

Men ate selected for I his training 
camp according lo I heir physical and 
menial Il lne ss, and wi th re gards to their 
appearance. Men may be physically 
and menially til but may be turned 
down because ot an iinsoldietly appear- 
ance. Previous military experience has 
also much lo do with Ihe selection of 
nun for i his camp. 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, .... Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



HANDS IT TO SENIORS 

The lollowlng clipping taken from the 
Boston Trawicript shows that even 
though athletic contests may get little 
note in Boston papers, matters win n 
the superhuman effort of a whole class 
is set fourth fall in for due credit. 

"Anyone who knows of a good relia- 
ble hair restorer, one lhat will make 
hundreds of hairs grow where no hairs 
ever grew before, should lose no time in 
packing his grip with the the prepara- 
tion and taking the next trolley for Am- 
herst anil I he Massachusetts Agriculture 

college. Once then! he can combine 

business and philanthropy, money get- 
ting and joy giving. As they note hlB 
arrival seniors will give forth a heavy 
sigh of relief, all because a recent class 
edict decreed that each and every one 
of them must raise a moustache at once 
and keep it until the Thanksgiving 
recess. The necessity for this harsh 
order arises from the two-forked fact 
thai it is now diliteult forafreshmau to 
know a senior when he sees him ami 
that an old college euHtom says that all 
freshmen shall salute all seniors." 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

OSes Hours: 1-3, 1-A p. rn. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 



Croysdale Inn 

HOUTH HADLEY. MARS. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone 262S-W, Holyoke. 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

OSJflS Hours: »to 12*. m.. 1-S0 to B p. in. 




RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. M»M*cho§etU 

EUROrEAN PLAN 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Next to Campion's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Agents for Ilex Typewriter 
F. M. CUR WAN C. F. 1) VI- k 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

kl OS AND CARPETS 

- K. D. MARSH raTATK — 

Kitiiiimii' i m>3 

Stbphkn Lane Foloh<. due. 

M A N- I 'I- *. -I I HI Nl, .IKW K.I.FH.*. 

ISO BROADWAY, NKW YORK 

<I.trn and CObLBOB 
PTNH AND HINQH * 

SOIJI, srt,T»n *HI> MtONSS M 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

Oateopiittt 



in v vnni 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

etr., of 

A. W, HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

t call st tbe Dorms and fraternity Houses. 



Read Our 

Appeal to Aggie Men 

on Page 4 



78 Main St. 

Nof'tliiiiiiplMii, 

Writing Paper 

With Class Numerals and College Seals 

All kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

8 93-*97 High St. 
SELLS 

Hart Schaf f ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke snd tee our 
big store. 






- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



liBCKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



•• HAMP 



Chrysanthemums 

Yellow Pink-White 

POMPOMS AND SINGLES 
For the Dinner Table . . . 

Nu 61ft i« More Munil'it-iint of the 

True Spirit of Friendship Than 

u Hoi of (lirysiiiilhemiiins 

Grown on the Campus 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

osteopathic PHYSICIAN 
305 LAMBIE BLDG,, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Telephone 



Telephone WW 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Com fortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan 



LETTERS FROM MEN IN C/VMP 

[< i nit timet! from p»K« Sj 



DRAPER LUNCH 



Northampton, Mass, 



delay entrained fur , arriving at 

three in the morning. Things were un- 
prepared tea us and so we made the best 
Of things until better could be had. 
The camp itself is far inferior to what 
we have beeu accustomed. The air is 
very damp at night, and the ground is 
very muddy. 1 forgot to mention that 
while os the boat some of us boys took 
care of some measles patients, and for 
this reason we have been "isolated" for 
sixteen days. You can imagine how 
provoked we are. However, as soon as 
t his is over I think we will leave immed- 
iately for training camps in France. 
The city here is very pretty, and typi- 
cally English, but at night everything 
is in darkness due to fear of (Jerman air 
raids. Most any time during the day 
English airplanes can be seen scouting 
around. Sometimes far above the 
clouds. There are many wounded 
soldiers recuperating here. They are 
only "mild" injuries but may have lost 
arms, legs, lingers, etc. Still they are 
very cheerful and the tales they tell of 
the battle front are extremely interest- 
ing and gruesome. All mail is cen- 
sored and so much 1 would like to say 
must be omitted. 

EVKKKTT IJ. S.VMtKliSON 18. 

(Sanitary L)ept. 
103 Machine (inn Bait. 
53 Brigade 20th Division 
American Exp. Forces 
% Postmaster N. Y. City. 



27th Infantry, 
Laredo, Texas. 
\.,v.f». 1014. 



Where all foods of the best 

quality are served at the 

minimum price 



We are mostly engaged in breaking in 
recruits here. All our old-limers, in- 
elud'mjj the officers, have been sent on, 
and we are pretty well Sited up with 
'bran-new' personnel. But the officers, 
many of then junior to me, are all 
enthusiastic, and we are making good 
progress. As soon as our cantonments 
are completed, we shall be well lixed for 
the winter. 

Tb«»"» U b l>P nf soelal eacltejamt 



about three hundred cadets here and 
there are about two hundred American 
cadets. 

Texas is a great place for Hying. You 
can land almost anywhere and believe 
me, we do. We fly to Dallas, have lunch 
and come home. In the afternoon we 
may fly to a small town thirty miles 
away where there is a girls college- 
some two thousand of 'era in one bunch. 

We expect to go across before the 
end of the year. We will go to England 
for a while and then to the real scrap. 

FKANK BAlMtltllKlK '18. 

MUSICAL CLUB ELECTIONS 

At a meeting of the Musical Clubs on 
Monday, leaders were elected to fill the 
vacancies caused by the loss of the men 
who did not return this year. The fol- 
lowing were elected. Leader of the 
glee club. Howard M. (iotf U» of Everett ; 
leader of the mandolin, Foster Hay nes 
'18 of Peabody; leader of orchestra, S. 
C. Sohnson '18 of Gloucester. 

JUNIOR SMOKER SOON 

The first Junior Smoker of the year 
will be held on Friday evening, Nov. 88 
at 7-30 in the Social Union. Several 
special stunts are under way. Every 
junior should be on hand and smoke up 
for there will be an abundance of 
"weed". 

KILLED IN TRENCHES 

One of the first Aggie men to meet 
death was Robert Henri Chapon of the 
class of 1014. Chapon left college to 
join the colors of France and do his bit 
for democracy. Afterattending a train- 
ing camp for a short time, he left for 
the front line trenches. For three 
weeks he was battling against the Teu- 
tons when on Dec. 30, 1014 he was killed. 
He was yet young in years for he bad 
only just passed his twentieth birthday. 
He was a member of the Phi Sigma 
Kappa fraternity. 



WM. M. KIMBALL, Proprietor. 



Russell, Bnrdsall & Ward Bolt and Hut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



K8TAHIJ*HKI> !■* 



JSBi. EMPIRE "SS,- 



Carptrcter St Morehoute 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mm 



here occasionally; and altogether our 
only excuse for complaint Is the fact 
that we seem lobe in line fur a perma- 
nent detail watching for suppositious 
Spik* across the creek. We are all 
chafing at the possibility of losing out 
•in the big game. But that may come 
yet. 

Meanwhile, any news from those more 
f..rt unate Is a feast. As an ex-Marine 1 
was interested in the communication 
from Paris Island. Greetings, Ellis, and 
my regards to any of my old shipmates 
you may run agalnsl ! 

•MsriN Hsuiswit '18. 



22 Mi AKHO SqtTADROK, 

Camp Uicki, 

Fokt Worth, Trxa». 

The air service is one great game. It 
surely is the finest branch of all to get In. 
Lots of thrills, good quarters to live in, 
Hue meals, good commission, and then 
too, you are an aviator, Simple, Its as 
hard to fly as it is to ride a bicycle. If 
any of you join up before the scrap is 
over, get in It. 

We have a wonderful field down here, 
one «tf the finest in the world. There 
are IS hangars for planes, and all the 
other buildings that go to make up a 
good.aviation Held. 

Most of the boys are cadets nearly 
ii nlshed. The Royal Flying Corps have 



WAR PAMPHLET BOX 

A pamphlet bux which is devoted 
solely to publications concerning 'he 
great war, is placed in the library for 
the use of the students, and will give 



interesting and useful information about 
such things as exemption rules, Liberty 
Loan progress, and munition workers. 



LIBRARY NOTES 
"The Natural style in Landscape har- 
dening" and "Outdoor Theaters," are 
the titles of two hook* recently written 
by Prol. Frank A. Waugh.and published 
by Richard O. Badger, of Boston. 



INTERCLASS FOOTBALL 

LC'ontinaBd boot page 1] 

the sophomores. Peterson and White 
the two remaining backs were also con- 
spicuous in their line plunging and end 
runs. 
The score: 

1910, 

I'ndorwood, le 
Bom. It 
Wood, Ig 
Bond, o 
Tirrell, rg 
Blanchard, rt 
Mansell, re 
Whittle.Capt., ejl» 
White, lhb 
Williams, rhb 
Peterson, fb 

Score- 1010 27, 
Whiltle3. Mansel 
downs — Ross 3. 
pire — Kennedy. 
Crafts. Timer - 
10-mInute periodi 



1020. 
re, Lothrop 
rt, Sullivan 
rg, Fuller 
c, Dwyer 
ig, Readio 
It, Bunker 
le, Carlton 
qb, Sweeney 
rhb, Jakeman 
lhb Grey 
fb, (ande Capt. 
1020 0. Touchdowns — 
I 1, Goals from touch- 
Referee— Dole, Urn- 
Linesmen — Fa\on, 
Roberts. Time — Four 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's a 
•'dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 




MERRITT CLARK & CO., g*SKT 



upton. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, Lincoln and Kingston Sts , 
BOSTON, flASS. 



Only two blocks from South Terminal 8to- 
tlon. and easily reached from North Station 
by Elevated Hallway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and business centre, 
also to the theaties and places of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Maaa. 

Where the Best 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

PROGRAM CHANGED DAILY 



HENR' 



The Rexall Store 



Drugs 

Sodas 



gars 
Candy 



Amherst, 



Mass. 



RECENT LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 

(Date of publication is 1»T7 unless 
otherwise specified, 1 

AOKK 1 1/H'ltK. 

American farm management association. 
PfOceedlSffSi v. 1, 1JU0+ 530.66 AinH. 
California rui'ersily. Publications in 
agricultural sciences, v. 1, IM8+ 
030.06 ClS-f 
Cbaniplin, M. Lessons in Held manage- 
ment. 630.65 C35+ 
Deere and Co. Better farm implements 
and how to use them. 130.021 1)35+ 
Karm implement news. The tractor 

Held book. 1016. 630.721 F22 + 
ttebrs, J. II. Productive agriculture. 

030 <J27 
Gillette, H. P. Handbook of clearing 
and grubbing met hods and cost. 
631'4 G41 
Hale, I*. H. Hale's history of agricul- 
ture by dates. 1915. 030 HIS 
Hall, A. 1). Agriculture after the war. 

1916. 630.948 1114a 
Hazen, M. 8. The neglected hay crop. 

888,048 1133 
Marks. M. M. Report on market system 
for New York city and on Open 
markets established in Manhattan. 
1015. 630.054 M35-I- 
Middleton, T. H. The recent develop- 
ment of German agriculture. 1010. 
010.043 U58 
Napier, J. M. Agriculture lor school 

aud farm. 1015. 375.(53 N16 
U. 8. Federal trade commission. Re- 
port on the beet sugar industry in the 
United States. 66.41 l'n4 

Animal Husbanoiiy, Daikyino ash 

Bkks. 
Kaupp, B. F. Poultry diseases and 

their treatment. 1914. 591.95 K16 
Massachusetts, .special milk board el 

the Department of health. Report. 
1918. 637 1 M3Hs 
Merwiu, II. C, The horse, his breeding, 

care, aud treatment in health and 

disease. 636.1 M5.'.h 
Miller, C. C. A thousand answers to 

beekeeping questions. 838 M69 
Miner, T Kssay on winter management 

of bees. 1861 82M M66e 
Parke, H. N. City milk supply, 627.1 

P22 
Quarles, 8. A Americau pheasant 

breediug and shooting. 1916. 688,68 

Savage, E. 8. Feeding dairy cattle. 
636.24 8a9 
Fink Akt, Hihtohy, ami Thavki„ 

American institute of architects. City 
planning progress in the United States. 
e917. 712 Am4+ 

Automobile blue book publishing to. 
official automobile blue book, New 
England and maritime provinces, 
7017. 917.4 AuH 

Bolton, Mrt, K. 8. Shirley uplands and 
intervales. 1HI4. 1W75 M3H Z Sh6b 

Chubb, P. Festivals and plays in 
schools and elsewhere, DU2. 792 
C47 

Dilnot. F. Lloyd George, the man and 
his story. 921 GS» 

Guide book of the Western U, 8.: 

She Northern Pacific route 917.N C15 
The Overland route 017.H 1,61 
The 8ante Fe route 017« D25 
The Shasta route 917.8 D5a 

Langdon, W. O. The Amherst Christ- 
mas mystery 1916, 70S U5a 

MacKaye, P, W, Community drama. 
792 M19 

Mills, E. A. Your national parks. 713.4 
M82 

Steiner, E, A, Introducing the Ameri- 
can spirit. 1915. 917,3 StS 



FRESHMEN 



Start your college year right. Huy your 
clothes and haberdashery where )ou can 
buy it to the bust advantage — where you can 
find the largest variety and best merchan- 
dise made in the best styles at (air prices'. 



Sheepskin Lined Coats, 
Sheepskin Lined Ulsters, 
Snappy Top Coats, 
Reversible Collared Shirts, 



$6.50 to $10 

$13 to $24 

$12 to $30 

$1.50 to $5 



Suits in Every Style and Price 

Guyer Hats 

Manhattan Shirts 

Altman Cravats 

OaHes Sweaters 

Interwoven and Holeproof Sox 




t/wl>yrl«ht I! art Behtlfn.r <£ Marx 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

II..I-I .Srluiltiicr 4% Mnrx Clotlie* 



1 



School ana College photographers . . . 




LOCALLY' 5 a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Had ley, liais 



Main Officb: 

i 546- 1 548 Broadway, 

New York City 



. m&umm<w i A.w * ^ sm& 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and must complete 

equipment obtainable 



I Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

Write todny *«»■- prl««» *»*> 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1357 fiwlsiiMi Farmers' Staaaard f»r Hair Y.ars 1917 

Ask For Our Crop Books. We Wanl Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 

Addreaa Agency >i « ■ . • « .ii«- •• 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Subsidiary <>t me American Agricultural Cheerful Ge. 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



•■-■---^-..-wy^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1917. 



/ 






Smith C. A. O, Henry, biography. 
HMtt. 081 I'h:$ 

ECONOMICS ANI> Soc IO.MK1Y. 

Academy of political science. The re- 
vision of the Mate constitution, lPlfi. 
342 Acl 

California. University, l'ublieations in 
economics, v. 1.1908+ 380.0 (J 12+ 

California. University, Publications in 
education' v. 1, 1898-880.6 GT2+ 

Campbell, W. J. Vital problems in 
rural leadership. 630.3 C15 

Connecticut. Convict labor eomniissiou. 
Report, mi. 331.5 C70 

(iibbs, W. S. The minimum Mi* of liv- 
intr. 838.5 G35 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'04. — Henshaw was on the campus for 
a few days last week. He is at present 
employed by the government in geolog- 
ical survey work by the Water Re- 
source Department , Portland, Ore. 

'16.— Earle S. Draper was married to 
Miss Norma Farwell at Turners Kails 
last May. They are living now at 
Charlotte. N. C. 

'15.— "Dick" Sears was seen about 
campus last Monday. He is attending 
the Harvard graduate school of land- 
scape architecture. 

'ltt.-L. B. Fielding has entered the 
employ of the government as a chemist. 
"Les" was roamed May 15 to Miss 
Hazel Booth of Maiden, but kept it a 
secret. 

'16.— "Susie" Dickinson is teachiug 
chemistry, mechanical drawing and 
agriculture in Proctor Academy, An- 
dover, N. 11. 

'10.- Sax Clark is in charge of the 
market news service in St. bonis, under 
the U. S. D. A. with head-quarters in 
the Chamber of Commerce building. 

'16.— Edgar A. Perry recently came 
east, in advance of 5000 sheep which he 
is to have charge of on a ranch at Center 
Harbor, X. H. 

'16.— "Pete" Simmons has enlisted in 
a forestry unit and is in training at 
Waabington. Linus H. Jones is acting 
is secretary of the class, with head- 
quarters in Amherst. 

'17.— "Sam" NoyeB was about college 
the first of the week renewing old ac- 
quaintances before reporting for ser- 
vice in the coast artillery at Fort Wetb- 
erell, Newport, R. I. 

'17.— Second Lieut. William Thayer, 

301st Infantry at Camp Devens, was 

around the old college during the past 
week cud. 

'17.-Frltz Larson was seen last week 
and says that be has not been drafted, 
as slated in a previous Coi.lkoiast 
Issue, but is working for the B. A M, 
while awaiting a call, 

♦17.—" Bud" Fisher spent a few hours 
ol "pass" from Camp Devens on the 
campus last week end. He is acting 
first sergeant In the Depot Brigade. 

'17.— Oswald Uebrend is at Niagara 
Falls, S, V., working In an alkali facility 
as a chemist. He likes the work lirst 
rale, but would like to be locale. i near 
Boston. It is rumored that the reason 
for bis inclinations to be near Boston is 
that there hi a girl in I be. ease. 
Behreiid's address is 415 Jefferson ave- 
nue, Niagara Falls, ft. V. 

E«,*17.— James S. Sims and Miss 
Charlotte W. Nickerson of Amberst 
were united in marriage, Sept. 89, at 
Am bant 



Chocolates, Pudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 



COLLEGIAN 

Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association , 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association. 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stock bridge Club. 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

C. A. Peters, Secretary — 454-W 
H. SI. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer— 403-M 
II. K. Bobbins, Manager— res. 62- VV 
L. T. Buckman, President — 416 
J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 
R. D. Hawley, Manager— H:m 
U. S. Klint,*Ma7nager — o44-M 
\V. S. Sawyer, Manager — 543 
L. N. Odaras, Manager— 203- M 
S. F. Tuthill, President— 416 
A. F. Williams, Manager— 8364 
1). If, Lipshires, Manager— 416 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 8347 
E. M. Biiffum, Manager— 8364 
1). O. Merrill, President— 416 
.1. H. Dav, President— 8377 
H. L. Russell * President— 11 9-R 
W Ilurlhurt. President— 421- M 
O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



CARS 

Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 720, 8.10, 
(> 10, 10-20, and at 20 minutes past the 
hour until 1 1-30 P. M. 



CARS 



Leave Amherst for M. A. C. at 6 05 6 25. 
7-00, 7-30, 8 00. 8-15, 915, 9 30, 10 15, 10 30. 
11 -15, 11-30, 12-30. 12-45, l i°* Ml and at 
45 minutes past the hour up to 9-45, and 
at 10 30 and hoop. m. 
Last car at 12 30 *. if . 

Special Cart at Reasonable Rates 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

MM!' Furnishing* Ticket ■nwni 

If AMITV tTRKCT 




High-Grade College WorK 
whins, - - * I*-*** 

('Hilars, - - 2I-2C 

Onto, - *»- 2c 

Plain Wash, - • per dog. 48c 

Same , rough dry, - p»-r do?.. 30c 

Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

Steam Pressing 4©c, ;i swlta for $1.00 

Dry cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a suit 



All bills wo-ahis « College !*tore an* paresis 
left thnrf Will rwelvn prompt Htlelltlnil. 



G, K. Babiitt , i7, Alpha Sigma Phi House ; F. E. Cols,] r.'so, College Store 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfielda, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt„ alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains'* to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mile* of Trackage node™ 
Equipment - Trala Dispatch- 
ing Sy item- Freight an<l V. %- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

uU(ll|Jdllf 






AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 20, 1917. 



SENIOR FOOTBALL TEAM 
WINS CLASS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Sophomores Also Victorious in An- 
nual Contest with Freshmen. 
Penalties Frequent. 



NINETEEN-NINETEEN TAKES 
HANDICAP MEET EASILY 



Carpenter's Running in the Distance 

Events Feature of Afternoon. 

Competition Keen. 



Nineteen-eighteen easily clinched the 
interclass foot ball t-hani }>t itmstii i> Satur- 
day, rtof, 17, l>y defeating the nineteen- 
nineteen eleven 1* 2 In a well played 
contest. The sophomores completed 
the triumph of (he even classes by beat- 
ing the freshmen IP to at the same 

time. 

The senior-junior game started wit h 
an exchange of punts which netted DO 
gHin for either side. Then Kiehardson 
'18 started things by intercep ing one of 
Whittle's forwards, going back up the 
field. Huunewell continued with a 25- 
yard run that brought the seniors near 
enough to enable ".Steve" to drop-kick 
the pigskiu over the posts for the lirst 
score of the game. Huunewell Inter- 
cepted another long forward, but before 
the seniors gained any advantage, the 
quarter closed. 

In the second quarter, Richardson 
came across wllh another long end run 
and Goodwin made a touchdown. The 
goal was not kicked. The seniors 
kicked to the juniors; Whittle, made a 
few yards, and a penalty brought the 
ball 15 yards nearer eighteen's goal. 
The junior team was forced to kick, and 
Ross booted the ball over the goal line 
where nineteen scored | satctv. theii 
only MMI of the game. The juniors 
tried to threaten the seniors' goal line 
14 h a^ecwwlon o£ forwards, but thev 
failed to work any of them and lost the 
ball on downs. 

In the second half, penalties were fre- 
quent. Throughout the game the bea»y 
line and fast back lie Id of the senior team 
broke up the junior plavs and smashed 
through tbelr defense. Richardson and 
Goodwin played a good game for l be 
senlorB. Whittle showed up strong lor 
the juniors in the baekfield, and Wtsjd 
and Tlrrell played their beads of! In 
the line. 



PALMER '16 CHOSEN LF A DER 
OF CAMP DEVENS ELEVFN 

Well Known Aggie Quarterback in 

Game Hard as Ever. ColDge 

Stars on Team. 



The line-up: 
Babbitt,™ 
Cotton, rt 
Boyd, rg 
Tilton, c 
Eden, lg 
Carter, It 
Sawyer, le 
Richardson, rfab 
Lipshireg, Ihb 
Goodwin Capt., fb 
ttunnewell. (h 

Score 1618 9, HUM * 
Goodwin, Goal from 



re, Mansell 

rt, lllanchard 

rg f TirrtH 

c, Bond 

lg. Wood 

it, Rom 

le, Underwood 

rbb, Wht. 

Ihb, Williams 

fb, Faxon 

qli. Whittle rapt. 

Touchdown!* 

Held- Ulchard- 



son, Hul»tiimiotis-l«18, Ur»hir« for 
Sawyer, Holmes for Carter, ilinee for 
Boyd, and Chapman for I.ijmhires. 
1919, Rowe for Underwood and Park- 
hurst for While. Retiree— Dole, M. A, 
('. Umpire— Swaffleld of Brown. Timer 

I Continued on t*«e 6l 



Nineteen-iiineteen's track team re- 
peated its victory ol a week ago in the 
handicap meet Saturday, winning this 
time by a (Baffin of 24 points over their 
nearest competitors, the sophomores. 
The uuclassilied students took third 
place, with a score four less than that 
of tWO, and the fresmen and seniors 
were respectively fourth and tilth. The 
number of entries was largei t hau ex- 
pected, considering the counter attract- 
ions of the afternoon, and the handicaps 
were such as to make the events close 
and hard fought. 

The htcllar performance of the af!er- 
uoon was that ol Carpenter 'if le IB* 
two mile, mile and hall-mile runs 
Scratch man in each ol I lose, he won 
aim. >st as he pleased, having a Rood 
margin at the tape in all of them. 

Hanson, unclassiiied, again showed 
his ability in the hurdle!, and in the 
broad jump, but the handicaps proved 
too much for him in the p-Miit". 

In i he discus throw a dark horse, 
Homer 'in, was brought to the front, 
ami won handily. Homer never thiew 
the discus before, but he displayed good 
form, and a limit handicap enabled him 
to come through. 

The 440 was the closest race oil lo- 
af tern. .on. Vesair TP start..) from 
scratch and barely nosed out Sweeney 
and I'ree at the linish by I he MRuWeat 
of margins, .Sumuiiirv 

ltKi-yani dash- nrsi, Dewing 20. 
scratch: second, (allanan "IP. 2yds.: 
(bird, Wright '20, :1yds. : fourth, Vesair 
TP, 1 1-2 yds. Time, 10 1-5 sec. 

Mile run r irst. Carpenter' lit, scratch ; 
second, Lyons *2U, 2:t mU.: third. West 
'2l,7»)d*. : fourth, Howe "IP, 75 yds. 
Time, ft mln. 

Two mile ran— First, Carpenter IP, 
scratch; second, GolT Tfl. scratch ; third. 
SUfford MP. KHi yds; fourth, Hallett '20. 
SOyde. Ti«e,li min., 11 sec. 

220 yard dash -First, Smith unci., 10 
yds.; aeeond. Alger *21.5 yds.; third. 
Wright **if),« yds. ; fourth, Vesair IP. 
scratch. Time. 24 l-r» se. 

Half-mile run Firsl, ('arpeuter, li», 
siTHtch: second, Sweeney 'J9,80y«b».: 
third. l.yotiM '20. 2ft yds, ; fourth. Dewing 
*W, 10 yds, Time, 2 min., 9 1-ft tee, 

440-yard dash — First. Vesair IP, 
m tatch : second. Bwcenej H>» in yds. : 
third. I'ree IN. h yds: lourth, Harriim- 
tnn *20, I*' yds. Time, M 1-5 sec 

ISO-yard hurdles Kir-t. Hanson unci, 

scratch: second. Newell *it), 2-5 sec; 

j third, Meserve '20, 1 sec. Time. IP see, 

^0-yani hurdles -First, Vesair '19. 

[ «VA sec; second. Calliinan 'IP, 4-ft sec; 

'third, Hanson unci., scratch; fourth. 

Newell *20, 1-fi sec Time. 27 4-5 sec 

High jump — First, Dewing '20, 2 in. ; 
second, Fos unci., 6 in.; third, Fogg *!», 
icononutd Ml pace si 



George B. I'almer 'lr(, was elected 
captain at the tamp Devens football 
team last week. He has been playing 
half-back on Hie soldier eleven, which 
hi composed of nan) New Kngland Col- 

lege stars, and is being coached Uj 
Percy Hainjhton, formerly of Harvard. 
This is the team which repi»scnts the 

whole tamp; there being one to each ol 

the Pi at my cantonments. 

While at " Viiu'ic.' 1'almei made a 
name for himself in athletics, being a 
letter man in both football and base- 
hall. He was quarterback oa theuescr- 
lo-be-l.. molten l'.M.'. Hi team, and at- 
tained quite a name for himself due to 
his cl.vci directing, kicking and for- 
w.ii.i passing, The next fall, when 
"Hoc" Brides resigned to goto Vale, 
Palmer came back to his Alma Mater 
as one of t he 1 hue alumni caches gsd 
helped weld together a shattctcd rem- 
nant of the former team Into an eleven 

win' h liallled "Sprlngtields Best. 

In all the newspaper reports of the 

Camp Devens team. Palmer has re- 

eivc.l special coliillielit due either to 



No. 6 

FACULTY FOOTBALL TEAM 
TO MEET SENIORS NOV. 24 

Battle Royal from Start to Finish 

Expected. Famous Men 

in Lineups. 

Who said the faculty didn't have 

pep? 

\n enthusiastic football session was 
held bs enthusiastic meinbcis of the 
faculty in r'tctieh Hall Monday even- 
ing. Their purpose w.i^ to get together 
a team ol pig-skin chasers to work ofl 

t he sin plus energy accumulating fiom 
an over consumption ol war calorics, 

\tter Brat explosions, Hcehl was 
elected captain, I'uiriugioti manager, 
iiniiciittv Hicks coach. II was thought 
tteceaaar] In elect two > •• I i leaders. 
Loekwood and Waugh were the chosen 
cheer chiets. 

After much discussion ss to who 
could play cadi posit ion best, the fol- 
lowing line-Up was linalh agreed upon. 
It was also agreed upon that if the 
players cannot appear they must send 
substitutes to take their phots, 

\s beaded in bj the (acuity manager 
t tic ntmbahli I B*UP will he : 



his punting or genctalship 



NEW YORK M. A. C. CLUB 



v. t a meeting of the Hoard of ttov- 
emois. M \ . l". club of New V«.rk, held 
Nov. 1st. the following ollicers weie 
elected Uj setve dillina the ensuing 
veai : President. W, U Morse '1st; vice- 
presidents, ,1. II, wcnn o> iimi iv. ri. 
Cochran s-J : rhoregtU, B. D. Foot '1*; 
trcasmci. F. \. Cutter '07 ; se.rei at > . 
A. T. Ilcals '02: chiiiiinau lloaid of tii.v- 
etnois, W. D. Husselt Hi ; and clerk of 

the Board, T. V. B eeo n o;i, 

OH account ol his arduous dulics as 
president ol the B, A <' railr-.aii andoii 
the defence cuin-ils of mir count ry, 
Daniel Willard M2 Iimi* it impossible to 
serve again »» president of the dub, 

l>r. John A. < Bttet 'W r ealgae d as 
secretary after ao years of fait hi ill ser- 
vice at that post. Hr, Culler will devot,. 
his time ami energy to medical socle t) 
work. 

c, K. Beach *W2 was nonilnaled to 
set ve as governor for the unexpired term 
of 111. Cutlet, resigned 

H. D. Foot *7W, H, K. < liHpin Hi, W. U 
Morse i«i, f. A, (utter 07 and Dr. Win- 
tield Ay res 'B8 wen nominated $m gov- 
ern.. is, to setve three years. 

The Ihiity-Iirst annual reunion and 
dinner will be held at Hotel Mausllcld. 
12 W44th Si.. New Vork f Ity, on Dec 7. 
at 7 P. vi. I'resident Mutterlield, Hcllll 
I^wii and (apt. David Falb.u ol the 
Aoaaea will be the speakers of the even- 
ing. 

The price per cover Is not to exceed 
1(8.00, All who are within flying dis- 
tance of New Vork are expected to 
1 attend. 



I lOt I, TV, 

Fmige. le 
sears. It 

( haliibcliain. lg 
iilahaui. c 
Hasbroiick, 1 _■ 
\\ cllingtoii. rt 

Kpfague, re 

\\ a Huh i< apt.). i|b 

Keraald, iht. 

, , ,. .1,1. 

Lock Wood, fb 



SKMOKS. 

le, Sawy« r 

ll. Carter 

lg, Kdea 

c, Tilton 

rg, li..vd 

Ft, tot ton 

re, babbitt 

t|b, Hunneweil 

Ihb. Lipabire* 

rhb. Iticbardst. ii 

fb, ( .in id w in 



Hiibstitutes; Phelan. t.ordoii, f'elem. 
Gales. 

(oadi Hicks think* the prospects f. r 
■ championship team a bright one sud 
pia.thc is to be started immediately. 
He asked 1 hat the candidates refra n 

in. in dissipation ..t an) son while In 

training. 

The tirst game has already been 
scheduled and soon the doughty war- 
rton ot the Friv.. I,, us Faculty will »•»* 
tbe .'senior Champions !■ a mtghtv 

conflict. 

Coach Hicks said that with fhe tpeet iy 
material at hand "Ujc" SVillt.ui. * Min- 
nesota shilt, likely will be eh lei the 
formation used. 

However, laying all joking wide the 
fa.ultv have ..rgaui/cil a real fiMitba I 
team and lirst practice Is to begin In 
the Drill ball torn. .t tow evening at 7 1 . 
M. A uood maiiv ol 1 he younger men - 
hers of the (acuity are already begin - 
! niug to accumulate f»l ami they think 
i il a good stunt to get into football togs 
once more to have some fun and to 
exercise, 

E»ery member of the facultj who 
puiT* like a C, V, freinht after dlrablng 
a Might of stairs will turn 01U l< r 
practice. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20. 1917. 



1/ 



I 



I 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
fiont.] 

Somewhere in France, Oct. 24, 1917. 



Had a tedious trip over here but 
can't tell you about it on account of the 
censorship. However. I can say that we 
were convoyed all the way and had 
absolutely no excitement, except to be a 
I'm It- anxious a few mornings and even- 
ings. 

I am comfortably situated and soon 
will be settled down to hard work. We 
have lots to learn. 

Beading matter is as Bcarce as hen's 
teeth, as is tobacco and American 
cigarettes. 

This is a funny country. You'd 
laugh to see the railroad trains, little 
diuky cars and engines. The people 
are naturally dirty as far as I have seen 
and the country is rotten. Am feeling 
fine and getting fat on the job. Get 
plenty to eat and can buy chocolate, 
bread, jam and biscuits when we want 
anything extra,tobacco is scarce though. 
Have met two Aggie men, one is in 
my outfit and another in another, 
Uave a good bunch of fellows in my 
battery. AH except those that came 
from Ayer are from New Bedford. The 
officers are princes, believe me. 

Hope the bunch is getting along O.K. 
Work hard for great days are coming 
after the war is over, and that is 
only a question of time before the 
enemy is completely trimmed. They 
know tbey are beaten now, but won't 
quit. 

(iive my best to all the boys. A fel- 
low out here can get a good serious 
view of life without half trying and 
realize that the things that count in 
life are the things one can get by living 
up to the ideals. 

Well I must blow out my candle and 
get into bed no as to save some of it for 
tomorrow Bight. 

D. Canmc '15. 



Aggie? Is all the bunch back? Write 
and tell me all about it. The only re- 
gret I have in this man's (?)armyis 
that I can't be with the bunch. I miss 
the fellows very much at timeB, especi- 
ally when I read the Collkoianb that 
my sister sends me. It makes me 
think of the good times 1 had at Am- 
herst, and believe me, when 1 buck a 
good job I wish that I was back. From 
what I hear the work at M. A. O. is 
tougher than any in the army. How 
about it? 

Yours as B 4, 
"Pep" Viokzzi, ex-'20. 



34th Co., 5th Bat. Depot Brigade. 

Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass. 
Oct. 12, 1917. 



I have been here at camp since Sept 
23 and am really enjoying myself, 
though when anybody at home asks 
how I like it I reply that I have to like 
it, before they have a chance to paBs 
that remark, which they invariably do 
as 1 am a draftee, but am not ashamed 
of that. 

Well, the regular routine life here 
has been well described in other letters 
so I will pass over that and simply men- 
tion the lateBt dope which is that 
George Palmer has just been elected 
captain of the division football team, 
which represents the whole camp. He 
played a whale of a game Saturday 
against Harvard. We have jUBt had a 
musical entertainment at the Y. M, 
C. A. tonight, which all the boys 
enjoyed. 

Well, I have eight minutes to run to 
my barracks and crawl under the 
wooleus before the first sergeant takes 
the roll at taps, 10 o'clock, so must 
close rather abruptly. With best 
wishes to all Aggie raeu on campus and 
elsewhere. 

Very truly, 
Hi km \.\ B. Nash '17. 



U. S. Ambulance Service, Section 10. 

Ameri can Expeditionary Force. 
France, Oct. 26, 1917. 

I have been very well, very happy, 
very busy and very well satisfied since I 
redoned the kbaki. I wish as a last re* 
quest (I will make it an official order 
later) that the gang at Amherst would 
send me some news, by mistake. 
Tours truly, 

C. Hioanii '18. 



At a "llelai" Post, Sept. 9, 1917. 



Fort Myer, Va., Nov, 10, 1917. 

I've been slow in fulfilling my prom- 
ise to write. I suppose you've already 
heard that I've been shipped south to 
Virginia. We are about two miles from 
Washington and so we can get off every 
night. We have a fairly good time. 

The first couple of weeks that I was 
here I worked in a ward In the hospital. 
The work there was a cinch. We had 
to clean up the place In the morning 
and then we sat around and sucked on 
butts. Last week 1 was put to work in 
the diet kitchen. The work is light but 
it takes all my lime. 

Today I showed a little pep and was 
put on the medical basket ball squad, 
I'll probably be a scrub, but as long as 
I get a few trips I shouldn't worry. 

To tell the truth I feel rotten tonight, 
and consequently this letter will be 
lhort, How is everything coming at 



STUDENT ADVERTISEMENTS 

of every nature are accepted for 
single issues or more. 



The "Collegian" is the Medium 

of reaching every student. 



If You Have Something 

to bring to their attention isn't this 
the logical way to go about it? 



1-inch space 45c an issue, other Bpace 
proportional. 



Drop your material in the "Collk- 
oun" office door. 



H. L. Rl'MKLL, Mgr.. "is 
K. M. KUFFUM. M9 



R. B. COLLINS. 'W 
F. K COLE. •» 



I am writing this while waiting for a 
call, but expect 1 shall have abundance 
of time to finish, as there is little doing 
now. Last night, about 8, I brought 
my car to the fool of a hill to wait tor 
darkness. You see the road on the 
other side is in plain view of the Ger- 
mans; so except In cases of extreme 
emergency, we do not use it in daytime. 
A little after 8 I drove slowly up to the 
advanced post. Batteries of various 
calibered guns were tiring on all sides. 
Their flashes of yellow flame made a 
pretty picture. By the time I had 
reached the "Abri" or dugout, my head 
was aching from the continuous concuss- 
ions. It sooo passed, however, A large 
city, which is held by the Bosehe, was 
burning slowly, whether set on Art by 
the French shells or by the enemy, I do 
not know. Although I have heard 
shells whistle for more than two weeks 
now, I instinctively look up as they 
pass overhead. About every 15 seconds 
a star shell would rise above the 
trenches In the valley .burst slowly, and 
gradually float down into the "abri," 
About 8-89 I went down into the"abri," 
which is about SO or 40 feet under 
ground, made up my bed on a stretcher, 
and turned in with all my clothes on. 
They are cold, damp places, these dug- 
outs; but, like everything else in the 
war, one gets accustomed to them. 
Your breath turns to white steam and 
floats above you as you He, but you are 
at least safe from shells, and that is the 
important thing. With every explosion 
of a battery almost overhead, the air 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 

Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want _____ 



SPECIAL SALE FOR ONE WEEK 
Columbia Scratch Pads, 8 1-2 in. by 5 in., - - 4 cents, 3 for 10c 

LooK over the now College Seals, 90 cents 



JBVVKLEHO 

The E. E. Millett Estate 

A fun tins of Oottsoe Jewelrj atwan in stock 
Broken Lenses replaced while vou wait 

Amherst, Mass. 



CH 



Lincoln Block, 

UNITY 

Plea s ast Stbeet. 
Regular Sunday Service at 1 0- 45 A.M. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



Thcrs are Seven Good Reasons why you should 

boy your 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELD 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

10 Pleasant Street 

Walk down towu and create an appetite. 
Hen Is where yon find the pies mother makes. 

Qood Service and Reasonable Prices 



The "Nonotuok* 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 
FIREPROOF EUROPEAN 

RATES, $1.50 PEN DAY AMI UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
—Proms— Our Specialty. 



would suck up through the passage 
with a peculiar moaning sound. 

About 5 A. m., just ;is a little light 
was beginning to make things discern- 
able through the fog. I drove back out 
of sight of the Bosehe to the "Relai-" 
where I now am writing. I did not 
have a single call during the night. 
The only sounds this morning are those 
of an encampment rousing to life, and 
the occasional boom of a big gun. 
Needless to say that I am very hungry 
ju il at present, as one gets very little to 
eat on advance post duty. This open 
air life does not tend to decrease the 
appetite, either. I wish you could see 
the amount of stuff a"poilu" carries on 
his back. As one of the men said of a 
lone soldier trudging down the road, 
"There goes the French array to capture 
Berlin." It certainly looked that way. 
I certainly hope this war Is over before 
many of our boys get to the front. It 
doesn't look that way now though. 
Now that we are in the U. 8. army we 
will be furnished with all the necessa- 
ries in the way of clothing, etc. I am 
drawing a little over a dollar a day. 
Must money 1 ever owned. 

Livingston Whigiit '19. 

Headquarters American 
Expeditionary Forces, 

Oct. 6. 1017. 



I have been intending to write you for 
quite a while, but this really has been 
the only chance that I have had. I bad 
quite a time hanging around New York 
city waiting for orders for a week. I 
put up at the Astor hotel all the time, 
and took in all the beBl shows.caharetH. 
etc. Finally they sent me to Syracuse 
to join the regiment, but I only stayed 
there four days as we left right away 
for France. I have been in this country 
almost three weeks now and lam begin- 
ning to like it first rate. We had a very 
pleasant and uneventful trip across the 
water but believe me land looked 
good when we finally sighted it. I was 
darn lonesome seeing nothing but 
water day after day. I didn't get sick 
all the way across,mucb to my surprise 
even though we did get some pretty 
rough days. The officers bad to do 
guard" duty oa ihe ^v ay acros s in ^b* 
form of lookout in the crows nest. It 
was just my darn luck to draw two 
wee tours of duty on the trip and 
believe me I was some relieved when 
they were over. The crow's nest wan 



can girl, I wish tbey were in this place 
instead of being 100 miles away as some 
of them were pretty darn good looking. 
I haven't run across Bud yet but I 
suppose he must be over by this time. 
I know he didn't leave before I did as 
the rirst of the reserve bunch came over 
in our ship. I have met quite a few 
Plattsburg fellows and former Medford 
fellows \a France so this world isn't so 
damn large after all. 1 was much sur- 
prised to see "Hay'' Griggs and "l>on" 
Jrancis at the last station. They are 
with a Mass. National Guard oi.ilit. 
"Hap" Day iB in the same regiraeul as 
I am bo there are a few Aggies over here. 
Write often as all I have to look forward 
to ig letters from Hie good old U. S. A. 
EuwAitn N. MiniiKi.i.. 



Johnson Book Co. 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -:- 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



United States Marines, 

Paris, Island, S. 0. 

Nov. 11, 1017. 



P. J. BEHAN 



about 100 feet above the water and I 
had to shin up a rope ladder. It was 
very pleasant up there, but during the 
eight hours that I was in it I wondered 
how in time I was going to gel down. 
We are now located In a small hamlet 
of about 160 inhabitants some 60 miles 
from the German lines. The men 
are living in wooden shacks and the 
officers are billeted in private houses. 
1 have a pretty good room but I can see 
that it is going to be some cold this win- 
ter. At present I am mess offlceT of the 
colonel's mess and consequently I eat 
with him. We are feeding fine as he is 
particular about bis chow. Vegetables, 
etc., are about all that can be bought in 
this place with the exception of wine. 
It surely is a great wine country and 
the prices are about one-fourth that of 
the states. You can buy a gTeat bottle 
of champagne for ten francB which la 
less than two bucks of our money. 

The French femmes are not numerous 
in this town, but were thicker than 
fleas at our last station. Some are 
pretty good but excuse me. On the way 
across to France wemet a lot of Ameri- 
can nurses and believe me It surely was 
good to talk United States to an Ameri- 



Your lelter came about ten days ago 
and I would have written sooner if I 
were not shooting. My company is on 
the range now and I do not wish to strain 
my eyes with reading by electric light. 
Today is Sunday and we have most of 
the day to ourselves. We have been 
having it easy for the last two weeks. 
We spend the whole day on the rifle 
range and do no drilling. Next week is 
our last week on the range so we will 
soon be back to real work again. It is 
about two miles to the range so all that 
we have to do is to march H miles a day 
and shoot SO Off 40 rounds. We also 
mark targets while others are shooting 
but that is not bad. 

The way things are now it looks as 
though we would get all our training 
here on this island instead of going to 
tjuantipo for practice in digging trenches 
as they did in the summer. If they do 
that, I will not get olT of I he island until 
I go to France unless I should be sent to 
some one of the "Islands" or some navy 
yard. 

You talk of having no "week-end" 
trips. I have not been outside of camp, 
except to go to the rifle range, for two 
months and do not expect to get out for 
at least two months more. We get no 
"Liberty" as they do at the army camps. 
Evcb if wo did there w ou l d -be-no ^lac« 
to go. I thought that Port Uoyal was 
going to be a good sized city and we 
would be able to go there once in a 
while. Pott Uoyal is where we leave 
the train and lake the boat for Paris 
Island. Port Uoyal is a "city" of about 
100 inhabitants of which about 75& are 
negroes. That Is what I am told. I was 
there only about half an hour the night 
that I came to this island. 

We are formed in drill companies of 
66 men. The 66 rata in my company 
represent m states so you see, 1 am 
among men from every part of the coun- 
try. We have movies every night and 
boxing every Friday night. The boxing 
is the real thing and the fighters are 
after blood. The tights go three rounds 
and, as a rule, at least one man loses 
some blood. Last week there was what 
we call a "grudge right,*' It was 
between two men of the 41st company. 
They got into some- kind of an argument 
while on i he rifle range and ended it up 
by putting the gloves on at Y. M. 0. A. 
that night. The fight went four rounds. 
By that time the men were about ready 
to drop so the doctor made them stop. 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of lltllnisn and Harnep streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, Is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It h iunt nates 
from Main Street. a«;iv from the noise and duat, 
and yet In the Beater of the bualneaa district. 

Ita rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water In every room. Prices $1 and up; roOtM 
with bath (single) $1.56 and up. 

Its excellent culstne and well ventilated din- 
ing room make h a meal a* pleasant memory— 
everything of the hlgbest'qiiality. well cooked 
and servedfln the beat possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and yon will 
anticipate itaylng there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland. Hotel, Springfield. Matt. 



Eats, 



Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



GOOD SERVICE 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



1 



COR 

* vrar> 



,. forty yeare we have rendered faithful service. For forty 

yean we have tried to make each year'« lervke more nearly 

ideal Thi» untiring effort has built for u» not only The Wotld't 

Large* Mail Order Seed Buibe**, but alio a World Wide 

reputatioa for Efficiency and untfoputed leaderihip. The 

Fortieth Annrrertary Edition of Burpee't Annual, the 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" ■ brighter and 

better than ever. It it mailed free. A pctcard wll bring M. 

W . ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Building. Philadelphia 



il 



Paee'fii Shoe Store 

Lar gest Stock— Lowest Prices 
Expert Ke-lioirltnuc— Beit leather "«*■<> 



It waa some tljjht. One of the men 
Kprnined his thumb so lie has nut been 
able In shoot this week. He will so on 
the range wilh (he 42nd company and 
tliHii i-onie back lo the 41st for drill. 

I .mi glad to lo>ar that the class of 
1920 i» on top this year. 

Tell the buys lo join the marines in- 
stead of the army, 

Mamd Wan. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

— DEALERS IN— 

Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



y 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 1917. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of t fie Masnachu- 
h.'Um Agricultural College, 



HO Mil) OF EDITORS. 

M A RftKALL < )• I. A N I'll EA li 'IH. K.lltor-lri-Chlef 
WESLEY S. SAWVKIt 'In. Managing Kditor 



war we have fallen down. We have 
been unable t<> stand the strain, The 
country must look elsewhere for men 
who are StiOSff, eoorageous, trained; 
men who are tilted to eonie forward In 
a time of crisis, put their best into it 
ami see it through. 



Assort a tk KniTous. 
AKTIirit N. BOWEM 19 

ELIOT M. HI II I'M "19 

AllTIII It I- « HANOI. Kit Mil 

M Y K TON F. KVASB '19 

BUSINESS DEPA KTM EST. 

ItlltliKKK. RtlSKQI'lST'lK. Business Manager 
SAMI'KI. B. KKISIIISS '1«. Assistant Manager 
<;. M. CAMPBELL 16. Advertising-Manager 
.IAMKS c. MAPLES l'u, Circulation 

<; m.kr;-:i> SMI TH ■». cl rcnlaHon 

SubBcription $2. (Ml per year. Single 
copieB, H cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Birjjer R. Rosequlst. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at second-class matter at the A inherit 
Poit Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Nov. 20. No. 6 



Crucial Time at Home. 

A spirit of discontent seems to he all 
prevalent ahoiil the campus, especially 
among the upper classes. In a way It 
may be jusiilied for a large proportion 
of the junior and seniors, some under- 
classmen in tail. c\|.ecl calls to service 
now or in the near future. TboUgfa 
this may lead to BMMlMM it should in 
noway interfere with the scholarship 
nt those concerned. It is not the true 
Augie spirit to put on a don't care air 
and swear off on studying at a time like 
this. As loftjt as we are in this college 
name why not slick to It and play for 
all wean> worth. Then when the call 
comes, we will he the better fitted I* 
take up a new lield of work. Men in 
military camps, tbongh feeling some- 
what pessimistic at times, are not lying 
down on I he job. We at the college 
have not made their sacrilicc. if we 
are plugging along from day to day, 
however, gelling something out of our 

.. . . r,n. W* 

are merely preparing ourselves for more 
ellicienl work in the near future, when 
il will most icrlai'ly be needed, l »n 

I he ol her hand. I hose who havt rolled 

for I he college \ ear and still persist in 
loalmg aboiil the house, doing no study- 
ing, are slackers in ever sense ol the 
word. They are doing absolutely 
nothing to help the country along 
in a lime of distress. They are lying 
down on the job. It is very bad for a 
few of the elans lo start the germ of ills- 
content mi the campus. It will spread 
rapidly once given a hold, lis results 
will be fatal to the college. Last year 
it might have had its place, but after 
sis uionilis of war, every one ol us 
should have decided what to do and be 
doing it. 

The nest three weeks form a crucial 
period in litis college year. We are 
back here with the understanding that 
the country is in need oi i rained work- 
ers in agriculture. We are -opposed to 
be fitting ourselves for that work, The 
watchword which we have promised to 
live up to for the year is "scholarship." 
fully in keeping with ihe idea of highly 
trained men. If the student body can 
come through with c««ly a lew Hunks 
and conditions at the close of this term, 
Ihe test will have been slow!. If ihe 
prose III record an ihe Dean's board 
holds, however, as a college we simply 
proclaim to the world thai in a time uf 



GIFT BOXES FROM M. A. C. 

The college general war service com- 
mittee has perfected, in the gift commit- 
tee, of which Hoyd '18 is chairman, a 
material method oi expressing the spirit 
of Ihe college to Ihe men, alumni and 
undergraduates, who are in activeservice 
in France. The committee has called 
for volunteers from the student body 
to gather and mail Christmas gift 
packages, not over seven pounds, to 34 
Aggie men. Those volunteering in 
such a capacity are in no way responsi- 
ble bin serve only the purpose of re- 
ceiving contributions, either gifts or 
money, and seeing that it is mailed to 
their man. In order to make sure that 
gifts and correspondence be in their 
hands by Christmas it is absolutely 
necessary that they be mailed before 
November SB. The students handling 
the proposition, and those whom they 
represent, are: Heuniann, Dr. J. E. 
Ooldthwaite '»? Ferris, C M. Streeter 
'IS; Itosei|iiist, A. S. Topper *l. r >; Huf- 
fum. It. K. Mel.ain 'IV. Ilunnewell, K. 
H. Origgs M. r >; Cotton, It. <J. Cande '15; 
.Spencer, K. S. Sanderson 'lit; Carpen- 
ter, Kilbon 'Hi; Sawyer, A. W. Spauld- 
ing 17: Pratt, P. H. Habcock '17: Foley, 
.1. II. Day 17: Miss Ferris, I.. W. BOM 
17: .lohnson, W .1. Alcott. .Jr., '17; 
Kichardson, K. Henderson M7: Bateh- 
eldar, Stftfl Hyde '17: Evans, C. A. 
Fraser 'IS: Chapman. E. M. Mitchell 
'IS; Lanphear, It. P. Holmes '18; 
llaynes, I,. C Higgins '18; Tilton, U.W. 
Ilarwood '18; Ooodwin, O. L Ooodrlch 
'18; S. s. Smith, A. L. Frellick "18; A.N. 
Howen, D. S. Francis '18; Eawrence, |j. 
F. Clapp Mh; Chandler, E.F. SeMoii Til: 
Miss Krhardl, A. I., l'ond '111; Qof , K. 
S. Holand 'lit; McCarty. F. S. Schenkel- 
berger 'lit; Lyons, W. H. Sprotil 'IU; 
I'eckham, F. V. Waugh •id; < rafts, A. 
i. Crawford IB; BokandelnBayor, u. H. 
How mar. 

SHORT COURSE ANNOUNCED 

The college announces its annual ten 
weeks winter courses beginning Dec. ol 
and extending through March i», in a 
pamphlet recently issued by the exten- 
sion department. The work will em- 
brace, besides the usual practical 
courses in varioiisagricult oral branches, 
special courses in foods, canning, dry- 
ing, storage and club supervision work, 
and a special course on food., and con- 
servation. Problems of marketing and 
distribution will be a feature of the 
lecture work. Those interested in 
junior class work will tlml a helpful 
course in this movement for food pro- 
duction, A large number of other 
course* covering a wide field are offered, 
such a- market gardening, fruit grow- 
ing, poultry husbandry, dairying, stock 
feeding, animal breeding, etc. 

Council are open to both men and 
women, with no required entrance ex- 
aminations. In view of the increased 
interest in food problems ihe attend- 
ance at these courses should be more 
than ordinarily large the coming 
winter. 

Wells Thompson ea*'lS a newly made 
seargent at Ayer was around the cam- 
pus on Saturday and Sunday, "Tom- 
mie" has been attending the non-com- 
missioned officers school at Ayer and 
ha* hopes of making (he third Officers 
Training Camp which starts .Ian §. 



Monday evening, Nov, 11, Clinton 
Raymond '18 was presented a wrist 
watch by his friends. Raymond has 
concluded bis studies at the college and 
has joined the Engineer Corps of the 
(Jolted States Army. It is the intention 
of the company, in which he has en- 
listed, to be in France by Thanksgiving 



"Bill" Sawyer *18 was around college 
the first three days of the week, renew- 
ing old acquaintances and haunts be- 
fore reporting Thursday to the aviation 
ground school at M. I. T. Boston. He 
was engaged by the Worcester county 
farm bureau this summer, taking a 
farm census with his cousin, "Red." 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the collf fce 
year of 1017-1018. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will— will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and coir redes in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Coi.i.k.oian, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 












Now please don't turn a deaf 
ear to the suggestion that you 
think of quality when you think 
of cloliies ft-i men and boy* 

Quality means wear — long 
wear and satisfaction. 

Prices moderate. 

MAIL ••HI. IK- H l I rn 

Rogers Pkbt Company 

Hroadway 

at S4th Ht. 







Hroadway 
st mh8t. 

Riaadwar 
st Wsrrsn 



"Tbs 

roar 

Corners" 

NEW YORK CITY 



Fifth At*. 

» t tUt Ht . 



THir WARNING SICNAl" 
INSURES PROPER SPEED 

NINE people out of ten turn the separator 
handle too slowly, causing a big cream 
loss. 

Bach cream losses are avoided with the 
New 1 >•■ Laval. The Bell Speed Indicator la 
a "warning signal" that Insures proper speed 
at all times. This one feature alone may 
easily save the cost of a separator in a few 



Other advantages of the New I >e Laval are 
greater ca parity, closer sk iinnilng and easier 
turning, simpler bowl construction and 
easier washing. 

High-grade construction and design, to- 
gether with perfect automatic lubrication. 
are a guarantee of durability and satisfac- 
tory service. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



166 BmoAOwar 
NEW YORK 



29 E, Madisou At, 
CHICAGO 



THE DAVENPORT 

The unsurpassed eating house for "Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 

Twas the !>.:.. I. marlers for *7t 

rs. J. K. W. Davenport, Pleasant St. 



-rtm- 



Shoe «, Hosiery and Soldier Supplies 

—SEE 

H BF RH AN tftt. 5 Soulh Collese 

BeprwetilitigTbos.S.Childsof Hoi joke 



S. S. HYDE 

,l«'\v«'i«c and (M'tu-iiin 

1.1 Pleasant Street 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repair- 
ing Promptly and Skilfully Done. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



TALKS OF TOMMY \TKINS 

Brewer Eddy addressed the student 
body at the Assembly, Nov. 14. telliag 
his experience in the war camps of 
Great Britain. One of his first impres- 
sions of London was that obtaiued I 
from the destruction ol an attack! ny 
ZeppHn, which was shot down and 
burned up in the dead of night by the 
ineendary bombs from i lie BnffUgh euns. ] 
Mr. Eddy went out to one of the great 
training camps at Salisbury where one- 
third of a million men wallowed in the 
mud from a mouth of continual rains. 
The men seemed to be very depressed in 
spirit, Men had been taken trom the] 
industries until equipment and sup- 
plies could not keep up with them, and 
women had to do the work. 

''Every man counts himself as a com- 
plete loss as soon as he enlists,' 1 he 
said, and ceases to worry about his own 
safety from then on. This accounts for 
the bravery of the men, because It iB 
said that no sign uf feeling has been 
shown by the men under fire; tbey 
want{toget to France as quickly as possi- 
ble. In Canada there are many towns 
where every able bodied man has none 
to the front, and families where most 
all of the boys are gone. 

It is a case of national mobilization ; 
every man, woman and child of (ireal 
Britain is doing his bit. The women 
are working in the 51)00 munition fac- 
tories that have sprung up since war. 
The men are bearing the burden of lux- 
ation that carries on the war. The busi- 
ness men give 40 per cent of their in- 
comes and 00 per cent, of their prolits 
for war taxes. 

This great price in life and property 
is being paid to protect national honor 
and righteousness. Hut what will be 
gained if the personal righteousness of 
the soldiers is lost.' lmnioiality, pro- 
fanity, and all kinds of vice arc increas- 
ing under the great national straiu and 
danger. The greatest problem of the 
United States iu Ibis war is to keep this 
tendency from breaking the character 
of our men. If we follow Kurope's 
example, our great training camp- will 
become the sore spots of America. 

What we need then is BOB of strong 
moral nature to resist this evil tendency 
of the war and establish leadership in 



HONOR ROLL STATISTICS 

The Honor Boll Committee has posted 
a list of all Aggie iiu'ii in acii\e war ser- 
vice on the schedule bulletin boards in 
the Social Union Boon*. The lists fur- 
nish to date the names, and as far as 
possible the military and home ad- 
dresses ol nine faculty members, 28i» 
alumni and undergraduates ami three 
iiiimi of the college who have been killed 
iu the trenches. The mole recent classes 
as would be supposed furnish the major- 
ity of the men. 1U17 lending with OH or 
approximately one third of the class 
when they entered as freshmen. By 
classes the number of men are to date, 
numbers that are being increase)! daily, 
are: Faculty 9 '7H-I ; '7*-l : "81-1 ; *Ho-2: 
'SI1-2; MI-2-1 : '04-1 ; 't»5-J ; (Mi- 1 ; 'i»7-4 ; '00- 
1; "00-1: '0.1-1 : 'tWi-1 ; '07-H: *<»«-2 ; "Oll-H ; 
'lti-1 ; '11-4: '12-4: lll-ltS; '14-lil; '15-14: 
'16-20; '17-68; '18-66; 'IMS; '20-10. 



HE AIM 



FACULTY AT CAMP DEVENS 

Aggie was well represented at college 
day at Aver Nov. 16. Ilean Lewis. 
Professors M ae K i in mie, Lock wood .Sears, 
ami Payne, Mr. Watts, Mr. Band, and 
Mr. Peacock left Amherst Friday morn- 
ing and spent the day looking over the 
cantonment where Professor Sears dis- 
tributed some apples to the boys. 

In the evening the members of the 
different New Knglaml colleges had sec- 
tions reserved for them at the mass 
meeting of the colleges where they 
were addressed by prominent men. 
Aggie bad between 50 and 60 men rep- 
resented in her reserve section; a gath- 
ering which was surpassed only by 
Harvard, Vale and Dartmouth. 



After twenty-five years close business association with the bead drebetd 
men in your college: 

To keep out lines of young men's togs so utleily small and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it wi!! be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart "trench" overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coat made, 
Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



SENIOR(S) SHOW STUFF 

Oh! Boy! Ob! Joy' Ihe seniors are 
now to demonstrate to an Hn*nst*eeting 
and credulous student body that tbey 
are expert thespian artists as well as 
eatnoutlagers. 

Mock bridge hall auditorium will be 
the scene of their efforts and Dec. K will 
be the dale. Not content to merely 
foist themselves upon the natives of 
the campus they plan to torture I he fa'r 
sex as well and they announce that 
an intorinal will be the order for the 
afternoon. 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

tampion's Block, .... Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 

n,T n OTBB-mftnlMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
Or. L. O. Whitman m i SHINE PARLOR 



character. This will be especially true 
bl the reconstruction periods following 
the war. Mr. Kddy said that (he col- 
lege men should train now to take Ihe 
leadership in these t lungs. " Your place 
is here in M. A. C." he said in closing. 



ECONOMICS CLUB OFFICERS 

At the second meeting of the Agricul- 
tural Economics Club the following 
officers were elected; President, J. E. 
< a I latum of Dorchester; vice-president, 
H, J, Record of W. Boylstoo? •ecretary 
and treasurer, M.F, Evans of West Som« 
erville. 

The questions to be discussed at this 
week's meeting which will be at 6-30 
Wednesday night In Clark If all will be, 
"The Possibility of .sheep Raising in 
New England. " 

SECOND INFORMAL 

Nearly one hundred couples enjoyed 
the second informal of the year. Ideal 
weather, a handicap meet, and the 
interclass football games furnished en- 
tertainment for the guests before danc- 
ing began. Many men from nearby 
camps took advantage of the day and 
were back. The freshman class which 
was unable to attend the first informal 
was well represented. It was to be re- 
gretted that the orchestra was slow in 
warming up and lacked some, uf the 
necessary pep. 



thief Sid .smith told us confidently 
that this year's senior show has Ihe 
Zeiglield Follies stopped to a standstill 
while Interlocutor Russell whispered 
in our ear several of the latest jokes 
and believe us they are a scream. 

Tobe Roberts I he Shy loch of the show, 
says that he realizes the boys haven't 
much money left after visiting the col- 
lege fund repository and wi has decided 
to charge only fill and 75 cents for the 
tickets. 

Here's a chance to take in the big 
;ittair of the year and take It from us, 
be who fails to take the Miss or the 
Mrs. to this rare display of talent is 
sure making some mis-take. 



SENATE MEETING 

The college senate, in joint session 
with the faculty committee, Tuesday 
evening, discussed the question of use 
of rooms in the various college build- 
ings for class and club meetings. Boyd 
*1H and Kichardson 'l** were appointed 
a committee to confer with a similar 
committee of the faculty, in deciding 
the matter. 

Smith *1« and Chapman *18 were ap- 
pointed to investigate the selling of 
unclassified recognition buttons, with a 
view to allowing the salesman to re- 
ceive a fair profit, and turn the surplus 
info the unclassified students' treasury. 



9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 

Croysdale Inn 

SOI'TIl IfAIHJCY. MAB8. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone -'•',•> vv , Holynke. 



E.B. DICKINSON, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Rb.ck, Amherst, Mass 

Office Hoars : H to 12 m. in ■ . I ■:*< * <> f> p. m . 



L 



RAHARS INN 

irtiismpt'in. MasMebQMtte 

EUROPEAN PLAN 



niv mm 'it 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

etc. uf 

A. W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I rail st Hit* norms and Fraterniti Houses. 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main Street, Masonic Building, 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

C/ostt/ only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. At. 

The Holyoke Valve t Hydrant Co. 

Jobber* of Wrought Iron and Brans t*1|*». 
Valves and r"lltlngs for Hteain. Water and 
Oaa, Asbestos and Magnesia Holler and Pip* 
covering*. Plpi ( ut toflketeh. Mill Bappltes 
Knulneera and Contractors for RtMU and 
Hot Wster Heating. Automatic Hiirinkler 
Systems, Holler and Engine Connnction*- 

Holyokc, Maw, 



■ BIDE-A-WEE 



>* 



Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

Our Specialty— And other good thing* t« tat. 

MRS. L. PH, STHBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mas*. 

Til. «i$-W 



Next to Campion's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Agents for Hex Tyiiewrlter 
P. M. CURRAN C. F. DYER 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

kl (IS AND CARPETS 
— K, D. MARHH K8TATK — 

K»i. •..•■•!■ IIM 

Stkpiikn Lank Foi.fiJK. 'inc.. 

NUMTAITI'IIIM. .IKWH.I lis 

180 BROADWAY, NKW YORK 

il. Ill AND C , <)I,.I,K<1K 

riNs and kin<;n .+ 
ooi.n, »»ir.vien inn rionsi msdaia 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

owtcopnlli 



7H Main St. 
v..riii.nii|.i 



Mi 



Writing Paper 

With Clay Numerals and College Seals 

AH kind* of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 

Fens, Banners and 

Pennants 






A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 



293-297 High St, 
SELLS— 



Hart Schaf f ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and *ee our 
big store. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 1917. 



V 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 1917. 



HECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



« HAMP »» 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OSTEOPATHIC l'liySKIAN 

305 LAMBIE BLOB., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone 



I 



TOWN HALL 



Thunday, 
Nov. 22 



Friday. 
Nov. 23 



Saturday. 
Nov. 24 



i 
- 



Monday and 
Tuesday. 



Nov. 26 and 27 



Artcraft 



lM>- 



Pauline FredoricK in 

"The Slave Market" 

anil 

Charlotte Greenwood in 

"Jane" 



Earle Williams and 
Ethel Grey Terry in 
"Arsene Lupin" 
Paramount Pictograph 

■ray Cartoon Comedy 

Edith Storey and Antonio 
Moreno in "Money Magic" 
3d episode of " The Fiahtin* 

Trail " 
Pathe New* Comedy 

Douglas Fairbanks In 
"In Again Out Again" 

A red-blooded, peppy pic- 
ture of the Fairbanks 
brand, full of hustle and 
laughs. 

The story ba» to do with the 
capers of an energetic youth 
who falls In love with n pretty 
maid from the Jersey side of 
the Hudson Klver. and i-on 
trary to the general rule, rinds 
it more difficult to net Into 
jail than to get out of it. 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable — Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan 



Pathe News, Klever Komedy 



Send Flowers 

Help conserve the sugar and 

send her a box ot 

flowers. 

Chrysanthemums, Roses, 
Carnations, Violets, Etc. 

Grown on the rumpus 

Dept. of Floriculture 

Telephone sou 



WIN ROPE PULL 

Six inches was the margin by which 
1920 defeated the freshmen in the six 
man rope pull Saturday afternoon. The 
contest, which preceded the football 
games, was even for a minute and a 
half, neither Bide being able to gain an 
inch of advantage. In the last half 
minute the sophomores managed to pull 
their opponents forward six inches, but 
in spite of desperate efforts this was all 
ilioy could get. 

The lineup of the teams was: 



1W20 


1921 


Hlum-hard, Capt. 


Kroeck, Capt. 


Bacon 


lirigliain 


Heserve 


Vinton 


Newell 


Freeman 


Holland 


Richardson 


Smith 


C. U. Brown 


Graves, Mgr. 


Starkey, Mgr. 



INTERCLASS FOOTBALL 

[Continued from page 1] 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOC4LLK; 5 2 Center St., Northampton Mastb., 

and South Hadley, Mass 



Main Oppici: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



Tlirse Studios offer the he.st skilled 
Afttata and mo»1 complete 

equipment obtainable 



— Chapman, at. A. C„ Head linesman 
— Hicks— M. A. C. Linesmen - S. 8. 
Smith *18 and S. 0. Johnson '19. Time 
— 10-minute pet bids. 

In the lirst half of the Sophomore- 
Fresbman game there was no scoring 
but much penalizing. Playing was 
pretty well centered in the middle of 
the field. In the second quarter both 
teams kicked frequently with little ad- 
vantaue for either side. Then nineteen- 
twenty started with a rush, Cande mak- 
ing two «ood line plunges and Grey fol- 
lowing up with a ten yard gain around 
end. They lost this advantage however, 
through penalties, McCormaek inter- 
cepted a forward pass and made twenty 
yards on the next play. In the second 
ball the Freshmen blocked two forwards 
and forced ihe Sophomores to kick but 
were unable to buck the Sophomore's 
line and lost the ball on downs. The 
Sxphomores then made the lirst touch- 
down of the game on a long end run by 
Ball. No goal was kicked. Inthefourth 
quarter, Ball and Cande both made 
good gains. Cande pushed the ball 
across tag line for another touchdown 
and kicked the goal. Lothrop intercept- 
ed a forward. Cande rushed the ball to 



\ 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS *NI» POULTRY DRESSPRS 

\\ IIOI.KSAI.K UM.Y 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, ^au 
sages, Poultry, dame, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



Blackstone, North and North Centre Streets, 
BOSTON, .... HASS. 



Russell, Bnrdsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 
nrTABurtiiKH \m 

Makers of TCTVIHP T"R *R B0LTS and 

The Celebrated JGi-KLlr XXiiHl NUTS 



Carptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Nathan A. Grout '20 of Sherbourne 
has pledged Kappa Gamma Phi. 

"Dick" Smith '17 spent a few days on 
the campus, during the first of the weak, 

Francis Chase ex-'2u is at Sutherland- 
shire, Scotland with New England Saw- 
mill Unit No. 1. 

Harold G. Noble '09 is now with the 
aviation department at Camp Kelly, 
San Antonio, Tex. 

"Rog" Chambers '18 has been trans- 
ferred from Camp Devens to San An- 
tonio, Texas, where he is receiving in- 
struction in aviation. 

There will be no assembly next Wed- 
nesday, because of the Thanksgiving 
recess. President Butlertleld will speak 
on the Wednesday following, Dec, 5, 

A pleasing feature of last Wednes- 
day's assembly was the display of 12 
huge yellow chrysanthemums, fully 
eight inches in diameter, grown by the 
floriculture department, 

A large number of the students, both 
the men and the co-eds turned out to 
the wax tread, last Thursday night. 
The music was of the best, furnished 
by a banjo combination. 

"Goo" Grayson ex-'18 was back on a 
four days' leave of absence last week. 
"Goo" is a Provost at Ayer and may be 
seen in the role of Traffic Cop from six 
to twelve on almost auy night. 

"Em" Grayson '17 could not resist 
the call and appeared for a short 
time at Aggie aud Mt. Holyoke on Sat- 
urday and Sunday. "Em" has been 
conserving the food supply of Gardner 
since he left college last spring. 

"Tim" Wilcox '17 has found all of the 
blister rust in and around At hoi and 
appeared in Amherst to recuperate 
over the week-end. "Tim" is thinking 
of going into the wildB of New Hamp- 
shire on a similar mission in the near 
future. 

A number of the college's contribu- 
tions to the army of democracy were 
seen on the campus Saturday, some en- 
joying a few "slags" at the Informal 
with the other fellow's girl. Among 
these were: Captain Weeks '18, Lieut. 



beTrve-yardTtne and "LenT^WenTnoveT Marshal 1 1M, Lieut. Sampson 18, I , 

Norero-ra '18, Sergt. Thompson *18, Gray- 
son 18, Willoughby '18, Eliott '18, 
"Tim" Wilcox '17 and "Em" Grayson 
were also on band for a good time. 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mat* 



for 1 be hist touchdown. Cande and 
ball were the chief line buckers for 
1930, while MrCormick and I.ong played 
well for 19*1. 
The lineup: 

ISM 1021 

U»throp, re re, Whittle 

Sullivan, rt t, G. Ktee 

Davenport, rg rrg, Martin 

bunker, e c, Mackintosh 

Readio, lg Ig, Brighara 

Dauget, It It, Ames 

Carlcton, le le, Bowen 

Ball,qb qb, Anderson 

Jakeman, rbb rhb, McCormaek 

Grey, lhb lhb, Long 

Cande, fb fb Miller. 

Score: 1920, 19. 1921, 0. Touch- 
downs— Ball, Cande, I-ent. Goal from 
touchdown Cande. Substitutions— 1920, 
Lent for Jakeman, Hurd for Cande, 
Ball for Grey, Sweeney for Ball, Crafts 
for Lot brop, Barman for Sullivan, Ful- 
ler for Davenport, Davis for Fuller, 
Richards for Readio. 1921, Cascio for 
Whittle, Gould for Rice. Referee- 
Dole '15, U. A. C. Umplri-Swaffleld, 
Brown. Timer-Turner, Headlines- 
man- Hicks. Linesmen Quadland, *20 
and Sampson '21, Time-20 minute 
periods. 

Morse '19 has left college to enter a 
course of training as a candidate for a 
commission at Fort Leaven worth, Kansas. 



RIFLE COMPETITION 

Sergeant Lee announces that there 
will be a competition in rifle shooting 
this fall for every man taking drill. 
The best man in each squad will be pick- 
ed and then these men will form a team 
to decide the champion company of the 
battalion. It is hoped that medals can 
be given to the men taking part in the 
final matches, and that a special medal 
be given to the winning company. 
Forty thousand rounds of ammunition 
have been ordered for the rifle practice. 
The versify ride team has been entered 
in the intercollegiate matches, and 
under the leadership of Capt, < .inlet 1 ia 
rapidly rounding into form. 



THIRD TRAINING CAMP 

Already thirty men including alumni 
and undergraduates have signed up for 
the Reserve Officers' Training camp to 
be held at Taphank, L. L, from Jan. 5 
to April 5. The physical examinations, 
except for those living at a great dh> 
1 a nee will be held at Amherst and will 
probably he under the direction of an 
army surgeon from the Northeastern 
Department at Boston. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
"dead one." 



Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 




MERRITT CLARK & CO., 5&&JS.KS! 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach. Lincoln and Kingston Stt . 
BOSTON, HASS. 



Only two block* from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and eaaily reacbed from North Station 
b» Elevated Hallway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and business centre, 
alio to the theatres and places of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



POMOLOGY CLUB 

The first meeting of the newly organ- 
ized Pomology club was held last Wed- 
nesday evening under the guidance of 
President Pratt in Wilder hall. The 
greater part of the evening was speut in 
organization followed by a lively and 
social time. Professor Sears was the 
principal speaker. It is the policy of 
the club to hold meetings on Thursdays 
at which outsiders prominent in horti- 
culture and pomology will speak on 
timely and appropriate subjects. A 
feature of the meetings will be the read- 
ing of articles from various fruit ami 
horticultural magazines. The date of 
the next meeting will be announced 
later. 



FRESHMEN 



Start your college year right. Buy your 
clothes and haberdashery where you can 
buy it to the best advantage — where you can 
find the largest variety and best merchan- 
dise made in the best styles at fair prices. 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 



Northampton, 



Mass. 



Where the Best 



Photo-Play 
Features ... 

An shown. 

AM CHANGED DAILY 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The Rexall Store 




Cigars 

Candy 



STRINGED ORCHESTRA 

The banjo-mandolin club is rapidly 
rounding into shape under the able 
leadership of Sidney Johnson *19. Ke- 
hearsals have been under way tor the 
past two weeks. The club this year is 
to be a purely stringed orchestra with 
no brass horns in the makeup. An eligi- 
ble drummer is badly Bended. The per- 
sonell of the club is as follows: Fogg 
'1», Holloway '«, t*M '^ ( ». violins; 
Canlett *1H. P, Keadio 'M, cellos: llaslam 
'20, clarinet: Wood '21, saxophone: 
Lahrovitz *Wk, Boardman "20, banjo- 
mandolins; Miller "21, banjo; Boyce M>, 
Oppe ' - 2ti. piano. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

'Ol—Dr, H. j. Franklin, .Superin- 
tendent of the Cranberry station of ». 
A. C. Experiment Station, has written a 
report of the Cranberry bub Station of 
li>lo, which will be published as bulle- 
tin So. 175 from the experiment Sta- 
tion. 

'05.— A. L. Adams contributes to the 
last number of Country Gentleman a 
thorough and extensive study of the 
farm labor problem in California. While 
this problem is serious everywhere, it Is 
complicated iu California by the poli- 
tics of Chinese labor. Mr. A. lams has 
been employed by the California State 
Council of Defense and has made ex- 
tended and interested studies ..1 the 
farm situation throughout the state. 

Professor K. A. Waugb contributes 
an article to the same papBroTi hybrid 
fruits. 

'11.— Nathaniel II. Hill announces his 
marriage on November 17 to Miss Emma 
F. Johnson at Mellville, N. J. They 
are making their home at llalfred 
Farms, Chagrin Falls, Obi... 

12.— G. Seott Fowler has recently 
been appointed AsalsUnt Chemist in 
the Ordinance Department of the U. ». 
Navy. Mr. Fowler is stationed at Ike 
Naval Proving Ground at Indian Head, 
Maryland, 

•la. -Thomas Hemauway and Mrs. 
Mary Oakley were united in marriage at 
Miami. Fla., last July. They are at 
present living at Quincy, Florida. 

'16.— Ralph 8. Bragg of Milford en- 
listed in Chicago recently In the Bid 
engineering regiment of the United 
States Army. 

*17.— "Bill" Saunders bow staggers 
about under the title of sporting editor 
of the Hampshire County Gazette, with 
a few odd jobs such as covering halts 
dozen runs, to give him recreation. 



Sheepskin Lined Coats, 
Sheepskin Lined Ulsters, 
Snappy Top Coats, 
Reversible Collared Shirts, 



$6.50 to $10 

$13 to $24 

$12 to $30 

$1.50 to $5 



Suits in Every Style and Price 

Guyer Hats 

Manhattan Shirts 

Altaian Cravats 

OaKes Sweaters 

Interwoven and Holeproof Sox 




Cotirr^li'. Xl«rt Schsffner £ JJar» 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Heart iiolififfner *v JM»i-j%c Clotliea 



I 



Campus Agent for Sanderson & Thompson 

PArUL FAXON '19 

He will handle your orders and furnish information. See him for best prices 

PHI SIGMA K4PPA MOUSE 



Northa mpton Players 

"MRS. BUMSTEAD-LEIGH" 



This Week 



Mats. 



Whartin Hall, the men's dormitory at 
Swart lira ore College, will be partly oc- 
cupied by women this year, due to war 
conditions. Thin marki the end of the 
segregation whieh has loDg been the cus- 
tom at Swarthtnore. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

w in.- 1 ... 1. . >■ *•«** 1 .■••««« - oa* 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 tiTiaiiawi r*r»««* Suaaara far Slaty Taara 1917 

Ask For Our Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 

o 

•v. 1. 1 .-«•-- Agetiosr Mran**a<«*" 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

HutwUdisirj of tto» American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

§ I CHAMBERS STREET - * MEW YORK CITY 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 1917. 



M 



MUSICAL CLUB TRIPS 

A ii hough DO extensive trips are 
planned for the Musical Clubs, this 
year a partial schedule is already ar- 
ranged. The lot nt Concert will he given 
in connection with the Senior Show on 
Dec. 8, The third annual concert in 
Holyoke is tu he held Dee. 21, in the 
City I I.i 1 1 This is one of the most pop- 
ular concerts of the year and always 
draws a large attendance. The usual 
concert at Hopkins Academy in lladley 
is postponed from Dee. 7 until Jan. 4, 
on account of conflicting dates. On 
Jan. 11 the cluba will play in the 
Springfield Auditorium. This is a new 
date and promises to he a good one. A 
concert will also he given in Shelhurne 
Falls. Dates are pending for concerts 
in Worcester and Framingham for the 
last of January. 



NEW TROLLEY SCHEDULES 

The following is the revised time 
tahle of the Connecticut Valley Street , 
Railway which went iuto e fleet on Nov. | 
19. On all week days except Saturday 
the (irst car leaves Amherst for North- 
ampton at 0-20 a. m., the next at 7-0° v. 
m., ami the service is then half hourly 
till 8-30 A. M. After that ears leave 
hourly till 1-00 i*. m., and starting then 
depart half hourly until 7-H0 p. K. 
After 7-30 p. m. hourly till 10-30 P.M., 
which is the last car from Amherst to 
Northampton. 

On Saturdays the first car leaves Am- 
herst at 6-20 A. a., the next at 7-00 a. m. 
and half hourly till 3-00 p. m. The next 
car after 3-30 p. \i. leaves at 44)5 p. m., 
and the succeeding ones every 20 min- 
utes. The last car leaves Amherst at 
10-2"> p. m fur Northampton. 

On Sundays the first car leaves Am- 
herst for Northampton at 8-30 a. M.,and 
the cars depart hourly till 12-30 p. m. 
From then on balf hourly till 10-30 p. K., 
which is the last car for Northampton. 

Cars from Northampton to Amherst on 
all week days except Saturday leave at 
6-20 a. m., 7-00 A. M., 7-30 A. M., H-00 a. 
m. aud then hourly until 1-00 p, m. 
After that half hourly till 8-00 p. m., 
and from that time on hourly till 11-00 
P. m., which is the last car fur Amherst. 

On Saturdays the cars leave North- 
a*np« ot! tb * g»"»e ttmo as fbey da Am- 
herst, and under the same regulations, 
except that the last ear leaves North- 
ampton at 11-06 p. m. 

On Sundays the first car leaves North- 
ampton for Amherst at 8-00 a. m., and 
the cars depart hourly till 1-00 p. m. 
From then on half hourly till 1 1 -00 P. 
ii., which is the last car fur Amherst, 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Pudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



HANDICAP MEET 

I Continued from psga lJ 



Sin,; fourth, Strong unci., 8 in. Height, 
6 ft. 1 1-2 in. 

Broad jump— First, Hanson unci., 
scratch; second, Sweeney ! 19, 5 in.; 
third, Redding '20, 8 in.; fourth, Hal- 
lett '21, 10 In. Distance, 1M ft. 8 in. 

Pole vault-First, Stafford 19, 2 ft. 2 
in.; second, spencer unci.. 1 ft. in.; 
third, Fox unci., 2 ft. 2 in.; fourth, 
Keumann '18, scratch. Height, 10 ft. 
4 in. 

Shot put-First, Newell "20, I ft.; sec 
ond, Kroeck '21, scratch ; third, Strong 
unci,, 4 ft. 6in.; fourth, Vinton "81,5 
ft. Distance, S4 ft, 6 In. 

Discus throw First, Howes '18, 20 
ft.-, second, Strong unci., 20 ft,; third, 
Hartwell *19, 10 ft.; fourth, Meserve '20, 
18 ft. Distance, 108 ft, 8 in. 

Total scores % 

1919-59; 1920—85; unclassified— 81 ; 
1921-11; 1918-8, 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAN 



CARS 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Associate Alumni, C A, Peters, Secretary— 454-W 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, H. M. Gore, Secretary— 403 -M 

M. A. C, Athletic Field Association, C. S. Hicks, Treasurer— 403-M 



Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C, Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



H K. Robbins, Manager— res. 62-VV 

H. L. Russell, President — 416 

C. G. Mattoon, Manager— 8338-W 

W. S. Sawyer. Manager — 543 

J. A. Chapman, Manager -8314 

K. H. Canlett, President— 8338 \Y 

I). M. Lipshires, Manager — 416 

K. M. Huffum, Manager— 8338-W 

K. L, Boyd, President — 416 

H. L. Russell 'President — 119-R 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8374 



Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 7-20. 8.10, 
i) 10, 10-20, and at 20 minutes past the 
hour until 11-20 P. M. 



CARS 



Leave Amherst for M. A. C. at 6 05 625. 
7-00, 7-30, 8 00, 8-15, 915, 9 30, 1015, 10 30, 
11*15, 11-30, 12-30, 12-45, '-3°< '-45 and at 
45 minutes past the hour up to 9-45, and 
at 10 39 and u~oc p. »». 
Last car at 12 30 A. m. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 




High-Grade College Work 

Shirts, - - - IO-15c 

Collar*, - - - 2I-2c 

Outs, - - - 2 1-2c 

Plain Wash, - - per doz. 4Se 

Same, rough dry, - per doz. «Hc 

Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

gleam Pressing 40c, 8 suits for $1.00 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, 91*59 a Suit 

AH bllli payable at College Wort and parcels 
loft there will receive prompt attention. 



LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 



Gent*' Furnishing! 



Ticket System 



II AMITY S>TRCET 



G. K. Babbitt '17, Alpha Sigma Phi House ; F. E. ColeJr.'zo, College Store 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfidds, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains " to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

g0 Mile* of Trackage -rioters 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System— Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 




Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 27, 1917. 



No. 7 



SENIORS DEFEAT FACULTY 
IN A ONE-SIDED CONTEST 

Open Game Triumphs Over Old 

Wedge Formations. Foley Breaks 

Leg. Fumbles Frequent. 

The Faculty-Senior game cm Saturday 
was not such a farce as several had pre- 
dicted it would be, although the More 
was 26 tu in favor of the Seniors. Had 
it not been for their triek plays and end 
runs, the Seniors never would have run 
up the score tbey did. for the Faculty 
line was like a stonewall. With more 
practice the Faculty would have shown 
up very much better; but as it was, the 
speed and aerial work of the Senior 
team was too much for them. The only 
mishap of the game occured when 
Bill Foley '18, met with disaster at the 
opening of the second half when he had 
his leg broken just above the ankle. 

The tirst touchdown was made on a 
fluke, when Payue attempted to punt 
from behind his own goal post and Bab- 
bitt fell on the ball after it hit the post 
and bounced back. Carter successfully 
kicked the goal. Babbitt received a 
forward from Richardson, and went 
over the Bne for a second touclidowu. 
The goal was not kicked. The third 
score came when Sawyer received a for- 
ward pass from Richardson and ran 80- 
yards. The last touchdown was made 
by Hunnewell as the result of a serieB 
of forwards. The goals for the last two 
were kicked by Carter, lie t ween the 
halves, Prof. Hecbt of the Floriculture 
department was presented with an 
enormous wreath of chrysanthemums 
and evergreen which bore the legend, 
"We love our dear professor." 

The stars for the Faculty were Payne, 
Wheeler, and McNult. while Richard- 
son, Hunnewell. and Babbitt did the 
most spectacular work fur 1918, 
The lineup: 



INFORMAL DANCE AND 

SENIOR SHOW ATTRACTION 

"Reveu of 1018" to be Given. Special 

Arrangements for Smith and 

Mt. Holyoke Girls. 

Saturday. Dec. 8th, will be the date of 
the last informal of the term, the last 
informal, possibly for many meli now in 
college and at training camps. To make 
it as attractive as possible, and provide 
added entertainment, the senior class 
will j. resent a show entitled "Reveu of 
191K" in Bowker Auditorium that even- 
ing in conjunction with the dame. I he 
latter will run until supper time, which 
will be late, and after that the inforinal- 
ites and such others of the slin<ent body 
who have been able insecure scats will 
have the opportunities of seeing the 
best vaudeville ever prod need on the 
campus. It is expected that there will 
be a great demand foC tickets. especially 
as they are at the popular price of lilty 
and seventy-live cents. 

In order that the Smith gills shall In- 
able to see this production, special 
arrangements have been made with the 
authorities of that college which will 
enable the informal gue-ts to stay until 
the 10-80 car, and the committee is liv- 
ing to make similar arrangements with 

the Dean ol Hi. Holyoke college. 

Men in service are urged to come back 
for this combined entertainment , and 
many have already signilied their inten- 
tion of attending. 



WASHINGTON M. A. 0. CLUB 



SENATE MAKES RULES 

FOR USE OF BUILDINGS 

More Definite Plan to be Followed by 

Organizations Meeting in 

Class Booms. 

in «>rder that adequate prerialo ay 

be made for the lice use of looms by 
classes and various oilier student «»r- 
gjini/alious, the following reeoinendn- 
l ions are hereby made : 

1. All college buildings, rooms and 
Office* Should be locked at I he close ol 

i he dftj s work. 

g. Prom "-:»» a. at, to 5-ftO r. M. on 
week .lays all buildings and rooms will 
be available lot meetings and other 

purposes, subject Ui the schedule ol 

class exercises, providing satisfactory 

arrangement* are made with the appro- 
priate depart incut head. 

;t. Meetings of classes and otherstu- 
denl organizations, which ale to be 

hehi after WW p. >'•• way be held in 

the following buildings, provided suit- 
able arrangements are made with the 
appropriate department heed : 

Drill Hall. Old Chapel Knlomoloyical 

Laboratory , Clark Hall. Bowket Audi- 
torium, Gilonell Aiena. 

4. Departmental clubs or organisa- 
tions may hold Reelings ai anv time, iii 

any room arranged t"r by the depart- 
ment head interested, 

.">. A responsible representative ol 

the student organisation, desiring to 
use a room or building lot a Meeting nt 

practice at any lime, liuisl make ai 
rangements tor the same with the ap- 
propiiate deparimeni head as far In 



FOURTEEN M. A. C. MEN 
WIN ARMY COMMISSIONS 

Clark a Captain. Gore, Worthley, 
Huntinglon and Hyde First Lieuten- 
ants in Officers' Reserve Corps. 

Fourteen Aggie men were among the 
"chosen few" vv hen Col. Paul A. Wolf, 
commandant ol the I'lal Isblirg otlieers 
training camp awarded commissions to 
S.V.'t.\ men who have been ifl training 
there. There we re three classes of com- 
missions: Class A includes those who 

are recdwmended for service and are 

called to active service afters leave ol 
absence until Dec 16, and are lo llll va- 
cancies in the national of regular army. 
Class It are recommended as second lieu- 
tenants provisional in the regular army 
or in the Q« H. C. < lass C includes all 
others iceommeinled but t or whom at 
present there ale no vacancies. Aggie 
had 1 1* men receiving commissions as 

follows : 

Class U. The following were iceom- 
meinled for eaetalu Infant rj : 

Norman ' lark IS. 
Ah lirst lieutenants for infantry: 
liaro n .M. I tore 'lit. 
Harry D. Brown 'H. 
Charles \, Huntinglon, Jr. 'HI. 
Harlan N. Worthley 'M. 
Thomas W. Desmond ex«T9. 

Kenneth V. Wright ,*J0. 

Willurd II. 1 1 awe v Iii 
First lieutenant recommended for 
lield artillery ! 

Caul H. Squires *17. 
class C. Commissioned^ as second 



SKNIOBS. 

Babbitt, re 

Holmes, rt 
Hance, I g 
Boyd, c 
hdes. le 
Carter, It 
Sawyer, le 
Hunnewell. ojb 
Foley, rhb 
Bic hard so n, Ihb 
(ioodwin, fb 



FACULTY. 

le, Wildon 

It, Dole 

Ig, Jones 

C, I "out ins 

rg, MeXutt 

rt, YanMetei 

re, Turner 

qb, Wheeler 

Ihb, 1'ayne 

rhb, llRcbt 

fb, McNeil 



Score -Seniors 38, Faculty o. Touch- 
downs -BabbtH 2, Sawyer, Htinnewell- 
Goalsfrom touchdowns— Carter S, Sub- 
stttntioni— Faculty, Wood for Jones; 
Merkle for Heeht. 1918— Mower for 
Ides *, Sawyer for Foley ; Eramerick for 
Sawyer. Referee— Darling. Umpire- 
Hicks. Timer -Roberts. Linesmen- 
S. S. Smith, White. Time— 8 minute 
periods. 

'18.— Herbert Headle has enliited in 
the Md Engineer's Corps, Camp Meade, 
Baltimore, Md. 



The Washington Alumni Club ^w as 
lionored Willi the presence ol rresideni 
K. I.. Butterliehl, who is the retiring 
president of the Association of Agri- 
cultural Colli ges anil Kxpcrirneiil Sta- 
tions, at an inlormal luncheon at the 
Botel Kbbiu, Washington. D. C M 
Friday. November 10th. The following 
were present : President t, U Butter 
field ; Mrs K. L. Hut lerlield ; I'rofessoi 
Frank A. Wangh; Profseso* William D. 
Ilnrd: Mm, W. D. Ilurd: Hufns W. 
Stimson, Boston; Professor William I'. 
Urooks *75: John W. Washburn '70: Mr. 
K. W. Allen, 'K6; K. ii. Flint 'M7; Hurt 
L. Hartwell *gf? <». A. Hillings W,i 
W. U. Beal. Honorary; William A. 
Hooker *f»: II. I.. Knight («; A. Vin- 
cent Ostium *(W:.I. A. Hvslop'08: I). B. 
Tower 12: J, H. Martin '12: II. A. Tttr- 
ncr '12: K. T. Seal 12; liennei A. I'or- 
j e i- '14; Trie i Miwnii Rogers "1»J: K. It. 
Se.lkregg l'»: Kilwanl A. Cheptn '17; 
W. D. Whitcomb '17; James I'. Murriu 

*1S. 

On Monday, Nov. Hith. the M. A. C. 
men attending the meeting id the OIH- 
oial Agricultural ("hemists held an in- 
formal luncheon at the Hotel Kbbitt. 
Eleven were present. Those attending 
who die! not attend the other luncheon 
were:— H. D. Hatikinii '90: S. W, Wiley 
'PM M. H, I'ingree '99, and ladles; K < 
Prouls '08; fi. A, Bach *04. 



riblc.and such arrange- I | lf ., |t ,., i:lll | o. ||, C : 



nieiits for evening meetings ttOSf be 
Bftde at bast four hours before the de- 
sired time of meeting. 

0. The president expects department 
heads It. deliver rooms i,, student or- 
ganisations, on the above baeie , la suit- 
abls condition, and nxneef* that stu- 

tlent oigani/atitHis will leave the MM 

in proper condition. Heads of depart- 
ments will be eipeetad lO report lo the 
president an] f all ore <>u the pan el ihn 

student organi/aiioiis to Btaal these 
ibligat ions. 



i.ewi* w. Spauldiag 'in. 
Class A. Called to active duty as sec- 
ond lieutenants: 

David Colter 10. 

C.ii ;ck J. Moyinhan "in. 

John J, Maginnii 'in, 

\( I'l.Oglel bOl pe.Ch,|tl;ilMtoga,Tellll. I 

o. F. Hyde Ifi reeeivetl commission as 
iir«t lieutenant < I, li. ' . 



LETTERS AWARDED "M" MEN 
At ■ ■ eating of the fetal committee 

on inlereoMegiate athletics on .Saturday 
Oie following ruling was made in regard 
to the awarding of baseball letters. 
That all nieii who had not received a 
letter In any other aport and who had 
played Id all the baseball games last 
spring were to he given the baseball 
"M". The following men were ■warded 
their letter according In this ruling, 
rlawley, Weettnan and Maginuts, 

in regard to the rille team Idlers I he 
(ruling was as follows: That the men 
1 who placed among the lirsl live tn tWO* 
thirds of the National Utile association 
matches would receive thellMl, The 
hollowing men received iheit letters by 
J the above ruling: F. II Canletl, A. B. 
1 Young, C. It. I'hipps, K. K. Harsoiis. 



CLASS NUMERALS AWARDED 

At 1 meeting id the JniereJass Ath- 
letic Board, last week, the following 
men were votetl as eligible for their 
class numerals ; 

191M Ko<»tball -Babbitt, Upshiriw, 
Cotton, Carter, Boyd, Kdes, Tllton, 
Richardson, Goodwin, llumiewell.chap- 
niau, Hance. Holmes, Raymond, Haw- 
vet, end I'relde. manager. 

Track Dewing 211, « allanau *19, CiofT 

Jti, .Sweeney 'H*. beat "20. Newell *20, 

Yesair 19, I'ree 19, Bpenest '2U, In an 

m Lfoea '20. Carlson 'in, Kroeck *ll. 
Carps rter *1», Balebelder i», Mt < arthy 

*'il, Parkhursi *li» Wnghl '2U. Hairing. 
ton '*». "I'd Mattoon IH, manager, 

1920 KtMitball Hullivan. Bunker, 
Davenpon, Sweeney , lieadio, Daggett, 
Ball, « arleton, |,otlirop, Jakcman, Oray, 
Ilurd, antl Peck hum, manager. 

Six man rope pull 1920- Blaiicbnrtl, 
Bacon, Holland, Ii. N. Smith, Meserve, 
Newell, ami Hraves.maitager, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



'/ 



I 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
frout.] 

At the Front, Sept. 19, 1917. 

No activity in this section as yet and 
I don't think there will be tor some 
time to come. There are, ut course, 
small attacks and raids, but nothing of 
any importance. I was talking with a 
"poilu" last evening who is one of those 
men reserved solely for attacking pur- 
poses . He said that they were to go 
over the top in an attempt to go over 
"No Man's Land" and to capture some 
Bosche trenches by hand-to-hand fight- 
ing. They carry only knives aud pis- 
tols. He showed me the knife, which 
was a business-like looking affair. Lust 
Saturday I was on duty at one of our 
advance posts when the Bosche sent 
over 10 or 19 bi<r shells. When you 
lirst hear them coming, they sound like 
the wind ■Ifrbiog about the corner of 
a house. This increases in intensity 
until it suddenly breaks into a deep 
throated roar. Theu there is a fraction 
of a second's pause before the concussion 
of the explosion. Dirt and debris were 
thrown high into the air and a heavy 
pall of black smoke bung over the spot 
where they were falling, about 200 
yards from ug. We are never in danger 
as our dugouts are SO or 40 feet deep. 
This a. If. I left at five for duty at this 
post. While wailiug for a call I am 
writing this letter. Now that the U. S. 
has taken us over you need not send 
money or clothes. If Russia does not 
make a separate peace, 1 think the war 
will be over by Spring. 

LlVl.NOSTON WUIOIIT '19. 



Well, here I am in France settled 
at last and working on the further 
training idea. I've had a wonderful 
trip even if there were a few hardships 
along with it, such as.no sleep, hunger, 
and cold, but it has all been good fan so 
far. We are in a tine place here and 
believe I will like it very well indeed. 
The fe l lowi ar o all a fin e bunch. — Evea 



now lean talk fairly decent French, at 
least I can make the people understand 
rot. In a few weeks I ought to have it 
down fairly well, I have lots of oppor- 
tunities. 

France is certainly a beautiful coun- 
try, I've seen quite a bit of it. Of course 
nearly everything is different than in 
the States, but the people are somewhat 
the same; (be girls are all very pretty 
but I'm laying off that stuff. My trip 
over the ocean was fine, wasn't seasick 
In the least, and it was somewhat excit- 
ing; sighted one sub. The trip across 
the English channel was exceedingly 
rough and as it was at night I slept on 
the floor down in ahold where the sides 
of the ship come together, but I slept 
good. I've men much of t he war opera- 
tions in the little time I've been here; 
the wounded coming in German prison 
camps, several airplanes have Mown 
around here today, also I was near 
enough to bear, an artillery duel at one 
time, I'm having a great time alright 
and a fine experience. < >f course I don't 
know what is going to be done with us, 
I can't write a thing about where £ am 
or what I'm doing, or anything, A 
great part of our meals consist of French 
bread and wine. The bread Is the best 
I've ever eaten and the only bread I 
could eat without butter; and the wine 
is fine when you get used to It, There 



isn't much water around. In fact I 
lived on bread and wiue for three days 
when •:omiug here. 

I've written to for smokes and tell 

her or remind her to send them every 
two weeks because I need a lot and 
what we get here are no good at all. 
I'll write as often as 1 can and wish you 
would do the same and tell me the news 
at college. Uemember me to the fellows 
I know. Here's luck and best regards. 

My address is 2nd Lieut., Louis W. 
Hobs, Inf. U. 8. R. American Expedition- 
ary Force. — B. 0. M. Paris, France. 

Bud Ross '17. 
Oct. 9, 1917. 



Royal Flying Corps, 
Camp Mohawk, Canada. Oct. 24, 1917. 

We are certainly a lucky squadron to 
to be sent up here. Tbere is no school 
in the States that can compare with 
this. We have plenty of machines to 
work with and new ones come in every 
day to replace the "crashes." Our 
squadron, the 84th, is called the "sui- 
cide" squadron, because all but one of 
the men who have been killed here 
belong to it. Capt. Vernon Castle is 
our squadron commander and there's 
nothing slow about him. 

I wmt up for the first time this morn- 
ing and il was bumpy and no mistake. 
As soon as we had left, the 'drome and 
were climbing nicely. Lieut. Snyder 
told me to fly the machine myself. 
There's really not much to just flying, 
but it's the devil to land. 

There were 17 crashes last Sunday 
and only one man killed and four badly 
hurt. This morning there were only 
two crashes and none hurt seriously. 
One chap tiew into a telegraph line on 
bis way down and ripped two poles out. 
He smashed his machine completely and 
only scratched his nose. Usually if one 
is not hurt they hustle him into another 
machine and let him goupandtryit 
over again. Altogether it's a mighty 
interesting life. 

All the officers are British except Ver- 
non Castle, and they seem to be a 
bunch of princes -men clear through. 
The majority of the men of coarse are 
Royal Flying Corps men. We are about 
i he only Americans up be>e, that is, the' 
56 of us who came from different schools 
in the States. We are treated top- 
notch, eat with the officers at their 
mess, and have almost unlimited privil- 
eges. The mess is great. There's 
something mighty wholesome about 
Canadian grub. And I know I've 
gained a couple of pounds already. 

We are given two and one-half hours 
"dual'Mnstruction and then we go up in 
our "solos". It will be some day for 
me when I gel up in a 'plane all by ray 
lonesome, Tbere are no queer sensa- 
tions connected with flying. When we 
hit a down current and drop about 50 
feet we have the same sensation as 
when one drops in a fast elevator. One 
goes straight down until he passes into 
the up current that always goes with 
the down current. And then one goes 
bouncing up again into the clouds. 
lint niie cannot imagine bow it seems to 
look down on the country and see the 
fields all marked off neatly in squares 
like a checker-board and the roads and 
streams like crooked ribbons running 
through them. I didn't have much of 
a chance to watch the landscape today 
for I was busy keeping her old nose 
pointed at the horizon and the rocker 
arms level. We'd go skipping along 
over the big waves in tbt air, sailing 
along as smoothly as a csnoe on a calm 

lake, when all of a sudden a side-gust 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



College Men 

are proverbially Critical Men— 
especially in the matter of Clothes 

Society SSranfc Glotbes 



Are the Preference of Thousands 
of the Student Body of America's 
Greatest Universities and Colleges 

Jordan Marsh Company is the favorite shopping place of 
thousands of college men in New England, undergraduates 
and alumni. 

Hence 

Isn't it quite right and logical that Society Brand Clothes 
should be carried in Boston by Jordan Marsh Company 
exclusively ? 

Purchases Delivered Free to Amherst 



Jordan Marsh Company 



H. L. Hl'MEIX. Mar., '18 
K M. BIFK1M. la 



R. B. COLLINS. '1» 
F. K COLK, *S0 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 

Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



SPECIAL SALE FOR ONE WEEK 
Columbia Scratch Pads, 8 1-2 in. by 5 in., • • 4 cents, 3 for 10c 

Look ever the new College Seals, 90 cents 



,n-.ui:i.i-:ivs 

The E. E. Millett Estate 

A full line of Collage Jewelry always In itock 
Broken Lenses replaced wnJle rem mA% 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



UNITY CHURCH 

Pl.EABAST STKKfcT. 

Regular Sunday Service at 10-45 A.M. 

A ( Inn -I'll home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



Send Flowers 

Help conserve the sugar and 

send her a box of 

flowers. 

Chrysanthemums, Roses, 
Carnations, Violets, Etc 

Grown im the Campus. 

Dept. of Floriculture 

Telephone M0 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 

The "Nonotuck'' 

Ho! yoke' s Leading Hotel 
FIREPROOF 



RATES, 11.50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Proms — Our Specialty. 



of wind would roll us over. Then I'd 
jam the old joystick a little to one side 
or the other aud we'd go along on the 
level again. A couple of times 1 tried 
to climb a little higher but I'd feel the 
joystick come back toward me and I'd 
know that Lieut Snider bad uifi'eient 
views on the subject. Gee, but it must 
be fun to be up alone on a clear day and 
frolic to your heart's content. If it's a 
fair day tomorrow I hope to have MMDS 
fun. Today was only my "joy-ride"; 
but tomorrow I shall go up "dual," run- 
ning the plane myself with only an in- 
structor to correct me now and then. 
Ivan Robkkts '20. 



DR. WILEY, SPEAKER 



Co. O. 101st Rent. Inf. 
American Expeditionary Force, via. NY. 

Oct. 23, 1917. 

Am still alive aud kicking, and 
haven't killed any Huns yet, but hope 
to before I get through. 

At present I am at the 1st OofpS 
School trying to leain some more dope. 
It is something similar to Plattsburg. 
but more to the point. Don't write to 
thiB address, if you should happen to 
drop a line, as I probably won't be 
here more than a week or so after you 
get this. 

Believe me, we will have some army 
before long. The work is interesting, 
even if it is learning how to kill some 
one.and you can't help but do your bent 
to learn it. It is some game. If the 
blame country wasn't so wet and muddy, 
it would be a pleasant time, but where 
we aren't staying at hotels, and stayiim 
in when it rains, you have to keep 
something doing to keep up the spirits 
Our company is billeted as well as any. 
They are in empty bouses. Each house 
has one or more fire places, which helps 
the cause along. The floors are of wood 
and the men have bunks. 

Well, I bave written all I have time 
to now, as it is time to go to a class, and 
I will try and mall this today. 

"Gooi.v," 

I.IKI I GKOKOK L. GOnllHIINlK. 



mth A«t o Squadron. Camp Ke 1 1 v . 
San Antonio, Tex., Nov. 18. 



I am down In the wildes of Texas, 
just outside of San Antonio. 1 bold 
down the rank of corporal. I thought 1 
would like to lie an aviator, but the 
doctor thought differently after be had 
examined me. Now I'm just a plain 
chauffeur "pushing" around a truck— 
once in awhile. I hop* to *'pu*l. ' it 
right into Berlin about Christmas time. 

I expect to be in France by then, at 
least. I hope to see some of Aggie's 
boys over there. They don't seem to be 
plentiful down in Texas. I guess that 
it isn't hot enough for them. I read 
the Collegia* regular and enjoy it as 
much as ever. It makes one think <»t 
the old college days. I would like to 
be back with yon, aud will, sometime, 
as soon as this "dammed" war Is over. 

I remain true to the college. 

Roaan E. tmtm 'It. 



"Do you kuow what the great funda- 
mental industry of this country hf f1 
asked Dr. Harvey W. Wiley of Washing* 
ton,D.C, the famous pure food aut horil y 
at last Wednesday's assembly. Il is 
eating. There are no laws to restrict, no 
child laws ami no retiring age, and In 
it there is more unskilled labor than 
any other industry. Behind it all I'es 
agrlanlture and in a critical state at 
present. The cause of present blgb 
prices is not scarcity but because money 
is cheap. Nearly all the gold in the 
world is in this country and we are 
spending it in such quantities that 
other nations look like "pikers. " 

The farmer Is not as enthusiastic as 
he should be; wheat has been the only 
commodity controlled. He isdiscoiiten- 
ted at the high priceof his commodities 
and the scarcity of labor. Exemption 
of farm labor is no eolation for boys, for 
the farm needs discipline and the army 
is the place for it. What are we going 
to do to replace agricultural man power.' 
Put in woman power. Hundreds of 
thousands of women can replace men 
and do the work far belter. Women of 
this country, especially of the East 
have been put upon a pedastal ami 
worshipped rather than given a 
chance to work. All great movements 
have been inspired by women, and the 
country should bave no fear to call on 
them for the mobili/at ion of the agri- 
cultural army. 

Food is going to win this war. Napo- 
leon realized that food is elemental to 
the greatest human endeavor. There 
are two great problems facing the food 
production of the country, lirst— the 
fertilizer situation. I'olash has been 
most needed hul numerous exploitations 
are uncovering many unknown sources 
in this country. Farmers have been 
taught the truth that they have been 
using it when it was unnecessary. 
There is an abundance of phosphates in 
the country and government interest in 
nitrogen assures the exploration of a 
new Held. The farmer's outlook is by 
no means black but only difficult and 
production is assured. The second Mil 
the greatest problem is distribution. 
This is a question for every patriotic 



Johnson Book Co, 



Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -:- 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of HlUuiau ami Hsirnes Streetn, three 
Mocks from the Union Itepot, Is a modem hos- 
telry run on the Kuropeiui l'lan. It is jiiMt a step 
from Main Htreet, away from the nome anildUHt, 
and yrt in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and mini iu table. 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room, i'rlces $1 and uti; rooms 
with bath (single) $1.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated din- 
ing room makes a meal ft pleasant memory 
e\erythlntfiof the highest quality, well cooked 
and served in the IicnI possible manner 

HtH> ;it the Highland Hotel once and you will 
antleliwte staying there again. Music eveiy 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Hl.hUnd.Hotrl. Springfield. Hats. 



Eats, 



Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



GOOD SERVICE 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Otensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



P. d. BEHAN 



MILITARY ADDRESSES 

Additional addreawii of Aggie men in 

■emo«. 

Earl A. Morgan ^19 H. Co. 38th Inf ; U. 

S. A. 

R. J. Mil Iron .Cam P Devem. 

G. B. Bigelow, 304th KuKineeni Sanita- 
tion Department AniNton. Alabama. 

A. E. Hendry. Camp Devens. 

F, A. Woods, 101 Mass, Field Artilery. 

H, Ij. Foole.AvialioD CorpB. 



citizen: how to utilize food, 

The greatest garbage can in the world 
is the American stomach. There In 
great need of econom izing and starting 
in the home with wholesome and sim- 
ple food. We eat with our eyes, and 
when served poliabed rice, white bread, 
commercial corn meal we eat sn many 
poisons, imp roper diet ia responsible 
for a large portion of army rejections for 
we are slaves of fashion and Bit be- 
came aumbody eim does, We in nut 
realise we are face to face with the 
greatest crisis in the history of the na- 
tion which means not the singing of 
national airs but is our lives, hopes, and 
honor. 




SUNDAY SPEAKER DEO. S. 

At Sunday chapel, the Rev. Frank 
Lincoln tioodspeed of Amberat will 
speak. Rev. Goodapeo d has received 
the degree of A. IS. at Harvard and 8. 
T, B. at Boston Lniversity and has had a 
wide experience as author and minister. 
Hi- was pasl hi* at Matta]Hiisett , Am- 
herst and at fSprinoiield before he waa 
called to Oakland Cil. For several 
summers he lectured in London and 
also wrote tnHiiy reliuioiis books and 
addretaes, 



Burpee's Seeds Grow 

FOR forty yean we bave rendered faithful semce. For forty 
yean we have tried to make each year's service more nearly 
ideal. This untiring effort has built for us not only The World's 
Largest Mail Order Seed Business, but also a World Wide 
reputation for Efficiency and undisputed leadership. The 
Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual, the 
"Leading American Seed Catalog" is brighter ami 
better than ever. It is mailed free. A postcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Building. PkUauieWdav 



aire's 



hoe Store 



Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
Expert HepalHng-BeBt lentlur uaeel 



'12. — Warren F. Fiiherdiek is in the 
Wtb Engineer's Corps of Company F, 
France. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



7 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



i 



TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening; 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural Collage, 

BOAKI) OF EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. LANHIKAK 'livKilltor-ln-Ctaief 
WKHLKY ;". SA\vu:ii 'i«. Mana gi n g Editor 



ABBOPIATK ElHTOKB. 
AKTrU'K N. BOWES 'l'.« 

ELIOT M. HI'KFIM M9 

AKTIM I! I- < -HAM»LKK Mil 

MYRTON F. EVANS M» 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
BIROERU. ROSF.qriST'18, Hnalneaa Manager 
8AMUKL B. KKUHISS M'.i. Aaaliitant Manager 
<;. M. < AM1'HKLL"20. AdvertisingManager 
.1 K M m C, MA IM.KS -20. Circulation 

<;. ALFRED SMITH •_'«>. e mulation 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at aecond-Plaaa matter at the A inherit 
Foal Office. 



Yol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Nov. 27. No. 7 



•<Xids Tricks" Again 
Now that cold weather has set in, the 
old question again comes up of keeping 
the pond clean of stones. With the 
Him eoating of ie#, freaninen, and In 
some rases uppertlassmen, seem to feel 
it their duty to test out its strength by 
a veritable bombardment, consisting of 
stones, rocks, or sticks. This is a trick 
that even in childhood days would be 
the cau-e of severe punishment from 
tit gang who skated there. The extent 
of the punishment fur the college man 
•hORM bo in direct proportion. It 
should be considered a serious offense. 
The condition of the ice on the pond 
bears directly upon the results of the 
hockey season. The team is handi- 
capped enough as it is without having 
the further drawback of a poor playing 
surface. Every member of the student 
body should see that he, for one. 
throws nothing on t he ice. Furthei- 



(Miarles H. dough '17 is now at Fort 
Slocum but has applied for application 
to the thin 1 training camp at Yapbank 
ns one of M. A. C.'s quota. 

■'IVte" Simmons 1(1 ami Cl'ntoii R. 
Raymond 'IS left Fort Slocum, New 

York harbor, last Tuesday with tbeSOth 

Engineers for active duty in Fiance. 

Dr. Wiley, on his recent visit to t he 
campus, was Introduced to the men tak- 
ing quantitative chemical analysis by 
Professor Chamberlain and gave I abort 
i :il k. on the chemistry of food. 

"Don" Campbell ex- 1 19, has returned 
from Fiance to his home in South Deei 
Held. "Don" went across with an am- 
bulance corps, but was turned down for 

physical reasons after arriving la France. 

The awarding of stripes at ('amp 
Devens in the 301 st light artillery tegi- 
in «- nt boosted Arthur E. Quimliy ex- ! 19 
from high private to sergeant in Bat- 
tery C and Frank A. Anderson '16 to 
corpora] In Battery B. 

G«orge Palmer 'Id Was in town Sun- 
day. He stopped over from the trip 
hack to Aver from Yapbank. (ieorge's 
football team won from Camp Upton by 

a 7-0 score, lie is playing an unusually 
tine game for the soldiers. 

Professor Sears of the pomology de- 
partment was elected chairman and 

member of the school committee of Am- 
herst, at the school committee meeting 
last Saturday, to take the place of Dr. 
Fernald, who has resigned. 

"Nate'tiillette ex-*lH was a visitor on 
the old campus last week, stopping oil 
for a few days on his way to Fort Leav- 
enworth, Kansas, where he has been 
called to receive final training and a 
commission a- second Lieutenant. 



tally related to this because of its means 
of destroying the efficiency of men and 
making them useless to face a crisis. 



The president's office is sending to 
the high school seniors of the state an 
attractive four page colored bulletin 
containing information relative to this , 
collage's training for positions of agri- 
cultural leadership. One page is de- 
voted to a pertinent discussion edtitled 
"Will you enter college next year?" 
and brings out the need of college 
trained men in the national affairs that 
are today facing the people and para- 
mount is the need of men trained in 
agriculture. Two full pages of campus 
cuts are exceedingly attractive. Copies 
may be secured from Secretary Ralph J. 
Walts. 

The class of 1919 had a smoker in the 
Social Union liooiu on Friday night. 



At a class meeting, preceeding the reg- 
ular program, a committee consisting of 
McCarthy, Stockwell, Goff, Newbold 
and Crowe was appointed tc confer with 
the committees of the sophomore and 
seuior classes in regard to a prom or 
hop. A number of vaudeville sketches 
were put on. each of which was clever 
and unique. After the Btunts there 
was a regular good time while refresh- 
ments were being served. The evening 
closed with singing. The smoker was 
a decided success, and the opinion of 
most of those present was that such an 
affair should become an institution and 
come at regular intervals. 

"C'est la guerre." The ratio of wom- 
en to men students at the University of 
Kansas, this fall, is three to one, while 
last year there were twice as many men 
as women. 



FOR \ UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



more, be should appoint himself a com- 
mittee of one to sec that no one else 
does this. Any freshman, or upper- 
classman in fact, who is guilty of throw- 
ing sticks or stones on l he pond should 
be reported io the senate and to the 
physical director's office. Then it is 
wholly possible that the very hole 
which his rock made in the ice may 
serve as aUuokinu pool for the offender. 
Why should it not be so? 



I will-will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Sanborn is has left college, intending 
to enlist in the heavy artillery. 

Harold Dickey 17 was in town for a 
few moments Sunday, lie is at present 
holding down a position in Springfield. 

Lincoln Kelsey '17. who is with the 
Hampden County Farm Bureau in the 
agricultural department, was back for a 
couple of days. 

"Cud'* Darling 10 was shout the 
campus over the week end. "Red" 
otliciated as referee of the Senior-Fac- 
ulty football game Saturday. 

"Crlto" Kennedy ex'lH was seen 
about the campus. He has passed the 
examination for an aviator ground 
■chool and expects to go South shortly, 

Elwin ti. Wood of Big Fork, Mont., a 
graduate of Washington Stale college 
and taking graduate work here in po- 
mology, leaves college Tuesday to join 
a Forestry unit. 



The office of the Registrar was the 
scene during the past few weeks, of a 
number of of secret and nocturnal meet- 
ings of the class of 1921 of Amherst col- 
lege. By this means they were able to 
form their plans for a successful ban- 
quet at Boston. 

Prof. Fred 0, Sears, chairman of the 
committee on food conservation for the 
town of Amherst, has made a detailed 
report of the community canning plant 
conducted at the college of which there 
were 91 patrons who had put up for 
them 5355 cans and jars of fruit, vegeta- 
bles, etc. 

The Animal Husbandry Club met 
Wednesday evening ami adopted a con- 
stitution. The dub is to meet on every 
( ,ther Wednesday. Prof. McNult ad- 
dressed the club, the subject of his 
talk being "opportunities in Animal 
Husbandry." There is going to be a 
decided increase in the raising of sheep 
and beef In N'ew England, according 
to Prof. McNutt. 

At a meeting of the Pomology Club, 
Thursday night, in Wilder Hall, the 
constitution was ratilied and an enter- 
tainment committee was appointed. A 
program committee was also appointed, 
A feature of the club is to be reports on 
readings in current publications with 
respect to fruit raising. The Pomology 
Club will meet the first and third 
Thursday of each month, 

B. L. Phillips. New England Field 
Agent of the Intercollegiate Prohibition 
Association made a short address at the 
chapel exercises of Friday, Nov. 28 on 
the subject of "The Situation and Pres- 
ent Relation of the War and the Liquor 
Trafhc". In brief, he pointed out that 
the nation's greatest problem Is the 
availability of man power for food pro- 
duction and not «o much a question of 
maintaining manufactures from natu- 
ral resources. The liquor t riffle is vi- 



Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Collegian, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 





Values, plain as A, B, C. 
Rogers Peet clothes, 
ioo per cent all-wool. 
Colors absolutely fast. 



Everything men and boys wear 

MAII. OimSBS JILLED 

Rogers Pebt Company 



Broad wrj 
at LSthHt. 

Broadway 
at Warren 



"TbS 

row 

Cornell " 

new yobk crrr 



Broadway 

St 94th Bt, 

urn. a » i . 
St 4ltt St. 



THIS'WARNING SIGNAL" 
INSURES PROPER SPEED 

ffSK people out of ten tarn the separator 
handle too itowbj, eaaaina; a bis cream 
loss. 

Bach cream tosses are avoided with the 
Mew D« Laval. The Belt Speed Indicator Is 
a "warning atgnal" that insures proper speed 
at all times. This one feature alone may 
easily saye the oost of a separator In a few 
months. 

Other ad vantages of the Sew De Laval are 
a-reater capacity, closer skimming and easier 
turning, simpler bowl construction and 
easier washing. 

High-grade construction and design, to- 
gether with perfect automatic Inbrlcation. 
are a guarantee of durability and satisfac- 
tory service. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



166 BROAOWAT 
SEW YORK 



1 1. Ma maris Bt. 
CHICAGO 



Northa mpton Players 

= "QUINCY ADAMS SAWYER" 



STUDENT CONFERENCE 

The conference of the Connecticut 
Valley Intercollegiate Union will be 
held at Mt. Uolyoke college Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday of this week. 
The M. A. C. representatives at the con- 
ference will he Mutkekar, Keumann 
'18, Boyd '18, S. 8. Clark '18, Parsons 
'19, and D. H. Smith '20. This conven- 
tion will be representative of all the 
colleges of the Connecticut Valley, and 
will be addressed by several speakers of 
note, among whom are: Brewer Eddy, 
American Board of Foreign Missions; 
F. C, U. Ewing of Lahore, India; Robert 
P. Wilder, founder of Student Volunteer 
Movement; Miss Margaret Burton, V. 
M. C. A. Secretary for Oriental Stu- 
dents; C. J. Wang, Y. M. V. A. Secre- 
tary, China; and Miss Helen B. Calder, 
Woman's Board of Missions. 



NEW POULTRY CLUB MAN 

A. L. Dean, Cornell 1913, has been 
appointed as state boys' and girls' 
poultry club organizer to fill the vacancy 
caused by the enlistment in the army of 
R. L. Henniger '17. Mr. Dean was ap- 
pointed by the V. S. D. A. co-operation 
with the state board of agriculture and 
and the college poultry department 
under Professor Graham and is an agent 
at the same time of the Bureau of 
Animal Industry. The new man is well 
adapted to fill Ibis position, majuring in 
poultry at Cornell, and spending two 
years of graduate work at New Hamp- 
shire State college, after which he 
entered the poultry business in Bing- 
ham pton, \ T, 

Boys' and girls' poultry club work is 
a comparatively new phase of extension 
work and is intended to stimulate inter- 
est in poultry production. The move- 
ment was started in South Carolina in 



1918 and now there are ten states sup- 
porting it. Masssachusetts took it up in 
1917 under Mr. Henuicer and ir>3 clubs 
have since beeu organized over the stale 
which is the only state in New England 
engaged in this work. 

RIFLE TEAM PRACTICE 

The eolleire rifle team is getting under 
way for the winter matches with pre- 
liminary practice. This work has been 
going on since last Thursday morning 
in the Drill Hall and consists of sling 
adjustment, position and sighting ex- 
ercises. So far the number of candi- 
dates has been very small, not more 
than half a dozen Freshmen and an 
eijual number of upper classmen have 
responded to Captain Cantlctt's call, 
It was intended to open up the indoor 
range Monday after Thanksgiving, but 
the small number of candidates have 
made it inadvisable at present. The 
range has been equipped this year with 
a new ventilating system which to- 
gether with the new heating faculties 
installed two years ago, makes a ureal 
improvement. If possible the annual 
Freshmen-Sophomore match will be 
shot just before Christmas, and the 
Varsity team will enter the Inter-colle- 
giate matches after N'ew Years. Men 
of last years' Varsity team are to be 
found at the Drill Hall during the day 
for the instruction of men. 



Princeton's Glee Club will, in the 
main, sing only at military training 
camps this year. 



S. S. HYDE 

J «_• W'»- I t- I- noil Optluloil 

13 Pleasant Street 

i ten lists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken I .en-.es 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repair- 
ing Promptly and skilfully liiinc 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



DRAPER LUNCH 



Northampton, Mass. 



Where all foods of the best 

quality are served at the 

minimum price 



M. KIMBALL, Proprietor. 



THE AIM 



This Week 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best dressed 
men in your college : 

To keep our lines of young men's logs so utterly smatt and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart " trench " overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coat made, 
Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



At the Young 1 Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's UUick, .... Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



DrLO Whitman * MHERST SHOE REPAIRING AN 
• *£ «.: Z^ZT SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 

Croysdale I mi 

SOUTH IIMil.KY. MARS. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat 

Telephone •„'•;:»- W . Holy ok p. 

E.B.DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Hlnck, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours : lUlla. in . 1-M to U p. in. 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

EUlOr E AN PLAN 




BUY YOUK 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

•■!■■■• " f 

A, W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I '-.ill at the Dornia and Fraternity Homm. 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNGH 

27 Main Street, Masonic Building, 
Northampton, Mass. 



Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



Closed only from / A. M. to 4 A, Af. 

The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

#onben of Wrought Iron and ftram l*ipe, 
Valves and Fitting* for Bream, Water and 
flaa, Atbeatoa and Magnesia Holler and Pine 
Covering*. Pip* <nt toRfcetrh, Mill ffiipjillea 
Kngineen and Contractor* for Hteani and 
Hot Water Heatlns. Antomatic Sprinkler 
System*. Holler and Lngtne Connertiona, 

Hoi yoke. Ma**. 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waff lea 

Oar Specialty — And other good thing* to Mt. 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, H adley, Man. 

Tel, 415 W 



Next t.i Campion'a 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pent 

Agent* for Rex Typewriter 
F. M. CURRAN C. F. DYER 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUJS AND CARPETS 
— E. I». MAItHH ESTATE — 



Stephen Lane Folojf. <iac.< 

MANITAITHHIMI JKWKI.KHJi 

1MO HKOADWAY, NEW YoHK 

OlAJIl A NO COLLEQR 
PINH AM) KI.M.s ■* 
w aa Ar?* n- nwnffg g at it : t* i~a 



DR. GEO. A. HASW] 

Oaiteopntti 



7§ Main St. 

Nortlinm pton, 



Mass, 



Writing Paper 

With Class Numerals and College Saais 

All kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 



393-397 High St. 
SELLS 



Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and see our 
big store. 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



I 






The Massachusetts Collegian. Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



HECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** HAMP ** 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OSTEOPATHIC I'll YHH IAN 

305 LAMBIE BLOB., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Telephone 



TOWN HALL 



Wednesday, 
Nov. 28 



Thursday. 
Nov. 29 

Holiday Kill 



Lionel Barry more :<ntl Irene 

Howley in "His Father'. 
Son." i>v ctiiinimur l "Mix k 
Pearl White in 'The Fatal 

Ring' _ 

Mr. and Mrt. Sy^dneyJOrew 

jarh ricHford in "The 

Dummy" 

and 

Edna Goodrich In Arm- 

•tromt'i Wife" 



Friday. 
Nov. 30 



I Saturday. 
Dec. 1 



Monday and 

Tuesday, 

Dec. 3 and 4 

Artcraft 



Marguerite MarK in "Th. 

Valentine Girl 
Paramount Plctograph 

Bray Cartoon 

Anita Stewart in "Clover'. 
Rebellion 
"The FiBhtinB Trail" 

New. Weekly BigVCome<|y 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

I Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan 



1916 NOTES 

Seheufele has left the employ of the 
Coe-Mortitner Fertilizer Co. and has en- 
listed. Submarine Patrol No. 687, U. S. 
Navy. 

•'(Tint" fioodwin was a week end 
visitor on the campus. 

Verbeck bas enlisted in the Balloon 
service and is stationed at Ft. Omaha, 
I Omaha, Neb. 

"Babe" Nash spent a day at the col- 
lege before leaving for Fort Leaveuworth 
where he enters training for a commis- 
sion in the regular army. 



GEORGE M. COHAN 

In a screen adaptation of lite 
own sensational staise hit, 

"Seven Keys to Baldpate" 

Heralded liy critics as the 

greatest novelty of 

the theatre. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

The speaker in Sunday Chapel, Nov. 
■>:>, was Prot. A. B. Benson of Yale. 
He gave a talk on "What should the 
college man's aim be after graduating 
from college, money or service?" The 
sp.c.h was short and very interesting, 
with many very good suggestions. 



periment stations in the four colonies of 
the Union. These give a two year 
course in practical farming only, and it 
is splendid. These schools have usually 
about 4000 acres and are well equipped. 
This shows you the immense size of 
things here; the average farm in this 
country is from 1,000 acres up. 

Finally each province or colony has a 
stale supported school which corre- 
sponds to our state universities in their 
embryonic stage. These are banded 
together in the University of South 
Africa of which each is a constituent 
college. Then there are the University 
of Cape Town and Victoria University 
near Cape Town which are both partially 
state supported. The school to which I 



Th-re are >-ever Good Kea'.,r^ v. I,y >ou should 
buy you- 



Newt Weehly 



Comedy 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant street 

Walk down town and create an appetite. 
Here Is where yon And the pies mother makes. 
Good Service and Reasonable Prices 



School ana College pbotograplws • 




. ^^ m i i v. ■• Center St., Northampton Mass.. 
LOCALLY: 5* ^ eni an d South Hadley. Ma*a 



Main Office: 

1 546-1 54S Broadway, 



New York City 



These Studios offer the ttf*1 skilled 
artists and most lompkte 



equipment nbuiui .t 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS *ND POULTRY ORESSFKS 

WHOl.KHAI.K ONLY 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hems, Bacoa, <au 
sages, Poultry. Game, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



Blackslone, North and North Centre Streets, 



BOSTON, 



J1ASS. 




Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 

WABUSHEU 184& 

JSZL. EMPIRE "SBT* 




C*rp«rvter St Morehous*, 

PRINTERS. 



No 1, Cook Place. 



Amherst, M*« 



DR. ANDERSON DESCRIBES 

LIFE IN SOUTH AFRICA 

Transvaal Univ. College, 
Pretoria, Transvaal. 

My Ukaic Dk. Chambkui.ais : — 

You can hardly imagine the difference 
bet wee u this country and the U. S. 
Every thing is different; we turn to the 
left when meet ing a person, and I should 
nut be at all surprised were I to see a 
man walking on his hands. 

(ape Town has some really wonderful 
views and we enjoyed our four days 
there very much ; of course most of the 
time was spent in shopping, for the four 
of us landed with only the clothes we 

wore. 

The people here are really spiendUl in 
many ways and 1 think 1 could like 
I hem all right were things not so differ- 
ent. The C S is far, far ahead of this 
country in every way. Let me enumer- 
ate: the houses are not heated; the hath 
rooms have Bo hot water. There are 
few horses all the wagons from the coun- 
try are drawn usually by 14 oxen or 14 
donkeys ;t he Kurd auto which costs there 
Hg§ costs here $1000. Everything else 
is the same Tiifa^artixact_flgures. 
Rents on houses here in Pretoria are 
lr..m IfO up for four rooms, kitchen, 
pauti> and hath and with no hot water. 
No one thinks of having clothes closets 
in ft house. The house such as 1 bought 
from Cramp ton e,.uld not be rented here 
for less than *7& per month. We are 
hoarding and rooming iu a very nice 
place : our expenses are #150 per month. 
We expect to remain at this place until 
we know more fully our plans for the 

niture. 

Education here is far behind that iu 
the T. S, They use the English system 
uf basing everything on examination, 
and examinations are set by outsiders. 
They have no system of certification by 
high schools such as we have. H a stu- 
dent fails in a single subject be is drop- 
ped from college. There Is a tremend- 
ous chance for educalloual reform. I 
have jnst written a popular article on 
Educational Ideals for South Africa, and 
will send you a copy soon. 1 shall not 
hesitate to do all I can for the improve- 
ment ot the educational system. 

The high sch.Miis are all under the 
provincial (state) educational depart- 
ment, not under the towns as with us. 
Thus, there Is a Transvaal Department 
of education which controls secondary 
education in this colony. Secondary 
agricultural education is under the 
Union Minister of Agriculture which 
correspond* to <»» r Depart meul of Agrt- 
eulture at Washington, There are four 
excellent agricultural colleges, and ex- 




.ame is the Agricultural College of the 
University of South Africa. It is 
designed to train men in higher agricul- 
ture. There are to be two of these state 
schools of higher agricultural education 
here iu S. A., one here at Pretoria and 
the other at the Agricultural College of 
Victoria University near Cape Town. 
You can see there are the secondary 
agricultural schools which have been 
running for a number of years and 
designed for practical farmers and which 
give no degrees. Then the two real 
agricultural colleges which have just 
been founded. 

The government bas set aside $600,000 
t£100,000l and a lot of land here at Pre- 
toria to start the school. But today we 
haven't one thing; haven't an office to 
which we can go. Furthermore, the 
money is tied up just now and the farm 
has not yet been turned over to the Uni- 
versity Council (Board of Regents). Our 
salaries are provided for and we are told 
to get to work with our plans. I cannot 
see auy building of any kind before one 
and a half to two years. 

At present I have three students whom 
I am meeting every day in the regular 
chemical laboratory. One of these is a 
real agricultural student and the other 
not. These men are splendid theoretic- 
ally. but can do not a thing experiment- 
ally. Their freshman course is good and 
I he others very poor. The professor 
knows his subject,but only lectures and 
leaves the students alone. 

1 nave a line associate as Pre 
Agriculture and 1 am sure we can get 
along together. Probably all the work 
of the agricultural college will be in the 
agricultural building. Apparently here 
every one tries to get out of all the work 
they can rather than take more. I 
think 1 can give auy chemistry I desire; 
of course the other fellow is crowded; 
any way I expect to give all the work Id 
agricultural chemistry and posssibly 
either some organic or beginning quanti- 
tative besides. 

Apparently nothing is furnished here. 
Free stationary, typewriting material, 
telephone, these are unheard of, Mrs. 
Anderson is my stenographer. 

1 think the future is good here, bat 
there are many risks. Johannesburg, 
85 miles away, baa the state school of 
mines and Is trying to found a privately 
endowed university with agricultural 
college and all. We haven't actual pos- 
session of the 1500,000, and the college 
farm, but we expect possession any time 
though of ooorse there is still the un- 
certainty. The only thing we are sure 
of for the year is our salary." 

Da, AstDEBSoir. 



'15.— Harold G. Hyde was married on 
June 18 to Miss Evelyn M. Boughtoo of 
Buffalo, N. Y. He Is at present em- 
ployed by the Consolidation Coal Co, 
in the engineer department of the Penn- 
sylvania division with headquarters at 
Somerset, Fa. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitiqus— or he's a 
•'dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO., l ffiS' 




THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, Lincoln and Kingston Sts., 
BOSTON, JTASS. 



Only two blocks from South Terminal Bu- 
tton, and easily reached from North Button 
by Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and business centre, 
also to the theaties and places of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Pnprletor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 



The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'12.— A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
George E. Merkle ou July 21, named 
George K. Jr. 

'13.— Marshall Headle has entered 
the Aviation service "somewhere in 
France." 

'11.— Muuroe <•}. Tarbell was married 
to Eugeua Denison Preseolt of Hertford, 
Conn, at Hartford, Nov. 10. Tarbell is 
at present employed as Assistant Engi- 
neer on State Highway Construction at 
Uuutington. 

'14.— A. M. Edgerton is iu the Field 
Artillery service of Camp Sheridan, 
Montgomery, Ala. 

'16.— Charles H. Gould and Miss 
Louise Davidson of Amherst were 
quietly married at the homeof the bride 
on the noon of Saturday, Nov. 24. 
"Charlie" was held agent of the college 
last year following giaduation and is 
now with the Hampshire County Farm 
Bureau at Northampton, Miss David- 
sou was employed as exchange tele- 
phone operator in Stoekbridge hall. 
After a short honeymoon they plan to 
make their home at Kendrick Place. 
Amherst. 

'16.— George A. Breed of Stoekbridge 
announces the engagement of his daugh- 
ter, Amy Breed, to Fred W. "Li.nnie" 
Jerome. Miss Breed is a graduate of 
the North Adams Normal school and 
has taught for the past year in Stock- 
bridge. Jerome while at college 
majored in pomology ami since gradu- 
ation has been farming in Connecticut 
and Massachusetts. 

Ex-'17.— Arthur S. Schur has been 
promoted to the position of Ordinance 
Sergeant, Camp Tyler. I^misvilie, Ky. 



THIS IS JUST THE WEATHER FOR A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Ours are going fast but we still have some good ones. 

$6.50 to $24.00 



We have just received a new line of 



Reversible Custom Made Shirts 



that are worth the once over. 



Prices - $1.50 to $5.00 



New Neckwear 50c to $1 .50 Flannel Shirts all prices Freshman Toques 75c 



Suits and Overcoats from $12 to $25 



1 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaflner & Marx Clothes 



Northampton, 



Mass. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Students at the University of Mon- 
tana presented a petition to the faculty 
asking that classes begin at 8-00 o'clock 
instead of 8-80. 

Kansas State University has devised 
g unique method of punishment for 
those professors who are guilty ol hold 
ing classes overtime. The names of 
such offenders are to be published on 
the first page of the Unltemitij Dally 
Kantian. 



Where the Best 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

PROGRAM CHANCED DAILY 



THE DAVENPORT 

The unsurpassed eating house for "Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 

— — 'Twas the headquarters for '71 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The Rexall Store 



Drugs 
Sodas 

Cigars 
Candy 



Amherst, 



Mass, 



RECENT LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 

Harrison, S, M. Community action 
through surveys. 030.308 1134 

Lauck, W\ J. Conditions of labor in 
American Industries. 331 .8 USA 

Massachusetts. Commission on high 
cost of living. Report, 838.5 M44 

Massachusetts. Special commission on 
military education and reserve. Re- 
port, isia. iM.i urn 

Massachusetts. Special commission on 
taxation. Report. 1910. 886.1 M38s 

Minnesota university. Current prob- 
lems. No. 1. 1018+ 809.06 M00 

Minnesota university. Studies in the 
.octal sciences. No. 1, 1918+ 880.6 
M60S+ 

National parcel post news. v. 1— N21 + 

Pease, E, R. The historr of the Fabian 
society. 1910. SSfi F88 

Vogt, P. L. Introduction to rural so- 
ciology. 88G.S T80 

Wolff, II. W. Co-operative credit for 
the United Stales. 884 W88ep 

SCIKKCK 

Annual chemical directory of the 
United States, v. 1,1917+ 640.3 An7 

California University. Publications 
In Botany, v. 1, 190S+ 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

Write »«»cirsy *«»*• prloesi on 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 The Irt MnB rFirt' Standard far Ststy Tears 1917 

Ask For Our Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 



o 



THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Sob«Wtary of the American Agricultural CTwnihml 0©« 

51 CHAMBERS STREET • • • HEW YORK CITY 



■hhwpwwh 



8 



1/ 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1917. 



Davies, (J. K. Social environment. 
575.3 D2M 

Egypt. Depi. of agriculture. Report 
on the great invasion of locusts in 
Egypt in 1W5. 1016. 595.891 Eg9+ 

Fabre, J. II. C. The life of the cater- 
pillar. 1916. 595.94 Fll E 

Harshbergar, J. W. The vegetation of 
the New Jersey pine-barrens. 1910. 

580.8 U25 

Insecutor inscitiae menstruus,a monthly 
journal of entomology, v. 1, 1913+ 
595.705 I118 

Keitt, T. E. The chemistry of farm 
practice. 547.63 K2(i 

Leighou, R. B. Chemistry of materi- 
als of the machine and building in- 
dustries. 620.1 L53 

Muni II. W. A. Edible and poisonous 
mushrooms. 1916. 583.37 M96e 

Norlbrup, E. F. Laws of physical 
science. 530 N81 

Sanderson. E. I). School entomology. 

595.7 Sa5s 

Smith, E. F. The life of Robert Hare, 
an American chemist (1891-1858) 

540.9 H-22 

OAHDKNB AM> TKKKH 

Boyle, J. G. Vegetable growing. 634.1 
B0O 

Dame, L. L. Typical elms and other 
treeB of Massachusetts. 1890. 63">.7 
D18+ 

Dick, J. H. Garden guide, the ama- 
teur gardener's handbook. 632 D55 

Morrison, E. How to make the garden 
pay. 634.1 M83 

Taubenhaus, J. J. The culture ami dis- 
eases of the sweet pea. 934.98 T19 

Townley, H. English woodlands and 
their story. 1910. 635.942 T66 

IH'MK ECONOMICS 

Bayliss, W. M. The physiology of food 
and economy of diet, 831 B34 

Jordan, E. O. food poisoning. 613,96 
J 76 

National emergency food garden com- 
mission. Home canning and drying 
manuals for vegetables and fruit. 

664.8 N22 

Riesenberg, K» Preserving at home. 



JAMES W. BRINE OO. 



Established over 40 years. 



286 Devonshire St. 



Boston 



Athletic and Sporting 



Official Outfitters for M. A. C. 



S 



Tennis Supplies 



Bathing Suits 



Camping Outfits 



Military Uniforms and Supplies 




Football 



Basketball 



Hockey 



Track 



Soccer 



w Baw Coats, $12.00 up 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



Brine's Sweaters Are Supei 



Ruse, Mrs. M. D. S. Feeding the fatally. 

1916. 641 R72f 
Stern and Spitz. Food for the worker. 

641 BM 

STUBKSTS AND TKAUUTSG 

Albertson, C. C. Chapel talks. HMO. 

252 All 
Bolwell.R. After eollege-wbal? 1916. 

878 B63 
Foster. W. T. Should students study ? 

878 Wis 
Jordan, D. S. The care and culture of 

sea. 1896. 370 J76 
Kilson, H. D. The scientific study of 

the college student. 150 K64 
Lowell, A. L. Liberty and discipline. 

1916. 878 L95 
Patri, A. A schoolmaster of the great 

•Ity. 871 P» 
Pearson. F. B. Reveries of a school- 
master, 871 P81 
Spring, L. W. A history of Williams 

College. 878.78 TJ07E* 
Thwlng, C. F, The training of men for 

the world's future. 1916. 878 T421 

—worn. — 

Shoes. Hosiery and Soldier Supplies 

— 1KB 

I. BERN AN 1920. 5 S.nth Coll*,* 

Representing Tbm. S. Childs of Holyoke 



Campus Agent, E. J. MANSELL '19, Phi Sigma Kappa House. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Associate Alumni, C. A. Peters, Secretary— 454-W 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, H. M. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 



M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



403-M 

H E. Robbins, Manager — res. 62-VV 

H. L. Russell, President — 416 

C. G. Mattoon, Manager— 8338-W 

W. S. Sawyer, Manager — 543 

J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 

F. H. Canlett, President— 8338-W 

D. M. Lipshires, Manager — 416 

E. M. Buffum, Manager— 8338-W 

R. L. Boyd, President — 416 

H. L. Russell, President — 119-R 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8374 



M. A. C. for Holyoke 7-20 and hourly 
until 11-20 P. m. 

M. A C for Amherst 6 20, 6-45, 7-20, 7-50, 
8-05, 8-20, then 20 min. and 35 mm. 
after the hour until 10-15 P.M. Other 
cars at 1 1-50 A. m., 350, 5-50, 7-50, 9 50, 
10-50 p. m., and a last car at 1 1-20 P. M. 

Amherst for M. A. C. 605, 6-30, then 
half-hourly until 800 A. M., 8-15, 9-15, 
then 15 min, and 30 min. alter the hour 
until 11 30 p. m. Other cars at 12-00 
noon and 4-00, 6-00, 8 00,10-00 p. M. and 
a last car at 12 30 P. m 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. BY. CO 




HiRh-Grade College Work 

Shirts, - - - I0-15c 

Collars, - - - 2 1-2c 

Cuffs, -.-- 2 l-2c 

Plain Wash, - - per doz. 4Sc 

Same, rough dry, - per dots. 30c 



Dry Cleaning and Prosing 

Steam Preying 40c, 3 suits for $1.00 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



Alt bills pn>fible at College Store and parcels 
left iin'if will receive prompt attention. 



G. K. Babbitt » 1 7, Alpha Sigma Phi House \ F. E. ColeJr.'so, College Store 



LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Santa* KurnUhi nits Ticket iff t en 

II AMITY STREET 

The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatrields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

10 Miles of Trackage Hodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 





S • COLLEGIAN 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tue sday, December 4 , 1917. 



No. 8 



SCHEDULE FOR TERM EXAMS 
ANNOUNCED BY REGISTRAR 

Start Wednesday at 7-30; Close Sat- 
urday Noon. Four a 
Day. 

Wednesday ■orntn*, Dee. II at 7-30 
t he final examinations for the first lenn 
start. They will be of two and a nut- 
ter hours duration, as last year, with 
ten minutes between the periods. The 
second period begins el Mi, the third 
at l-OO and the fourth at 3-25 and ends 
at 5-40. The last examination closes 
Saturday at 12-10. There follows a com- 
plete schedule of all the exams: 

WlliV'KSI.AV, I)K»'. 12, 1917. 
7-30 to 0-45 A. m. 

Rural Sociology 60, F. H. F. 

Agricultural Education 50, S. II. 118 

English 50, S. H. Ill 

Uotany 55, C. 11. B 

Freshman Chemistry 1 and 4, Drill Hall 

9-56 to 12-10 A. m. 
Uural Engineering 75. .S. II. 102 
Market Gardening 75, F. U. 1> 
Dairy 77. F. L. K 
Chemistry 80, C. I*. 
Mathematics 76, M. B. B 
Sophomore Physics 25, Drill Ball 

1-00 to 3-15 p. M. 
Agricultural Economics 75, ('. H. B 
Economies and Sociology 51, S. H. 10S 
Sophomore Zoology 25, Drill Hall 

3-26 to 5-40 p. M. 

Poultry 51,8. U. 102 
FbtfkHiHa r e 6 3 . IV H. C 
Botany 62, C. H. B 
Zoology 50, E. B. K 
Mathematics 60, M. B 



RENO WELB0URN TO GIVE 
EXPERIMENTAL LECTURES 

"Modern Science" Subject of First 
Social Union Entertain- 
ment, 



Microbiology 50, Micro. L. 
Freshman Algebra, E. B. Pit and M. B. 
TuiitHi»AV, Dm . 13, 1917. 
7-30 to 9-45 A. m. 
Poultry 60, S. H. 102 
Landscape 75, W. H. A 
Chemistry 51, C. L. 
Teterinary 60, V. L. B 
Sophomore English 26, Drill Hall 

9-55 to 12-10 A. M. 
Floriculture 75, F. H, C 
Pomology 77, W. H. B 
Botany 60, C. H. B 
Entomology 70, E. B. K 
(Jermau 75, F. Drill Hall 
Sophomore French 25 and 28, Drill Hall. 
Sophomore German 25 and 2§, Drill Hall 

1-00 to 8-15 i'. M. 
Floriculture 50, F. H. 
Entomology 50, E, B. K 
Chemistry 7«, C, U 
Agronomy 75, S. H. 102 
Forestry 50, F. H, H 
Landscape Special, \V, H. A 
Microbiology Hi. Micro. Lab. 
Freshman English 1, Drill Hall 

S-2S to 5-4© P. M. 
Rural Engineering 76, S. H. 102 
Agricultural Education 75, S. H. 113 
(Continued on page "I 



The first of the college entertain- 
ments, for the coming year, under the 
auspices of the Social Union, will be 
given Friday evening, Dec. 7, in Bowker 
Auditorium, when Mr. Be BO B. r?**- 
bourn will give experimental lectures 
on the marvels and mysteries of modern 
science. 

Mr. Welbourn, who travels on the 
Chautauqua program, is no stranger to 
the campus, for he gave an entertaining 
lecture to the studenta in the old chapel 
in November, 1912. Since then he has 
been all over the country lecturing to 
all sorts of gatherings and in all kinds 

of places. 

That this scientific demonstrator can 

be interesting there is no doubt, for be 
combines the two behest purposes ol 
the lyceum platform-entertainment 
and instruction. He is an excellent 
lecturer, and above all, he is humorous, 
keeping up a continuous stream of 
witty explanatory remarks In fa* t, hi - 
lectures are nearly as interesting as his 
experiments. As a scientific demon 
strator, however, Mr. Welbourn shows 
rare ability, for his long experience has 
enabled him to perform the most dilli- 
eult experiments with the utmost ease. 
These lectures, which show the tri- 
umph of science over elemental difficul- 
ties, are given in two parts. The first, 
en mi«.d "Mode rn M iracles", con sists of 
80 experiments. The second section, 
under the caption of "In the Year 2000" 
is a prophecy of the future, constating 
of 35 experiments that show what the 
scientific world is doing for the benefit 
of future generations. This has been 
delivered more than 600 times and is 
considered a standard of its type. 

The New York IP«W</ says. "He iua<le 
the dreams of Jules Verne become 
realities before the eyes of his audience, 
and nothing seemed longer to be im- 
possible," The Memphis Neit»-Sri„,i- 
tar is quoted, "Aladdin, with his magic 
lamp, could not have done more than 
did Mr. Welbourn with chemicals, 
lights, and shadows.' 1 

Social Cnlou tickets, which are 
issued to all students ami obtain ad- 
mittance to all entertainments, may be 
obtained from the treasurer's olli.e. 
An admission fee of 50 cents will be im- 
puted upon all non-holders of these 
tickets and the general public. 



SIXTY SEVEN M. A. C. MEN 
APPLY FOR OFFICERS* CAMP 

Quota of Thirty Six Men to be Picked 
December Tenth. 

M.A.C has once again oversubscribed 
its quota. Expected, but not required, 
to send thirty-six men, alumni and un- 
dergraduates, to the Third Otficers 
Training Camp at Yapliank, she offers 
sixty-seven or an o\ er-siibseription of 
eigbly-six percent. Of this number, 
i he majority are alumni, most of whom 
are now training i'» I lie National Army 
camps and the undermad nates are 
among those enlisted in the college B. 
O. T. C. These men will be required to 
take a physb-il examination from an 
army surgeon, Monday, Dee. 10, before 
linally being accepted for the camp. 

Those selected will he required to 
make the journey to the training camp 
at their own expense but will be reim- 
bursed on the first payroll at the rate of 
31 cents per mile. 

There are no objections offered to 
those who wish to provide themselves 

with proper uniform before they report 
to the camp but they cannot expect any 
reimbursment for sueh. While candi- 
dates, they will receive the pay and 
allowances of privates liist class; this 
will be about |30 per month plus food. 
elolhes.and quarters. 

Ipoii reporting at the training camp 
Jan. 5, they will be required to enlist 
for the duration of the war and it, at 
tel completing the three months course. 
thev are not recommended for comm 



SENIORS TO PUT ON REVUE 
OF 1918 SATURDAY NIGHT 

Promises to be a Laugh from Begin- 
ning to End. Already Large 
Advance Sale of Seats. 

The senior show promises to upset all 
traditions on hereditary dignity, for by 
far the btggeol laugh (on the senium) 
of the present college reel will bettaged 
in Bowker \iiditorium. Saturday even- 
ing at 8-30. 

The program will consist of a musical 
revue featuring the end men who are 

bound to gal across some good si nil. 
Following the minstrel will be a short 
idio full o! all timet things 'cast e\ 
peeled from stately seniors. There will 
be four surpiscs in rapid succession, so 

odd in many respect* that the manage- 
ment yuarantccs the most jaded id win- 
ners will not leave the kail without hist 

■bedding oceans oi mirthful tears. 

Ihink of it! \ chance in a lifetime— 
the only chance ever' ol losing yoiir- 
sell Ifl I he frolic* of 1018! 

The Informal is going to be excep- 
tional, for there will be many men back 
in unlfi.ru, M a. 11 U »* lame number ol 
underloads who expect lo make this 

day's entertainment, the last ef its kimi 

on aggiO*! campus lor some time to 
come, one WBg to be lemeinl.cicd. I DC 
BSate will stop promptly at 8-20 ami 
the informalities will have lo step lively 
to reach the auditorium before the cui- 
tain goes up on the first act. 



SPAULDING NOT INJURED 



The rumor whieh has spread around 
campus the last few days concerning 
A! Spaulding T7 is entirely without 
foundation. This fact was established I 
through the efforts of the Physical Edu- 
cation department and is a relief to all 
his friends in college. 



CHAPEL SPEAKER DEFINES 

THE ALL /VROLND MAti 

At the chapel I rvices last Sunday. 
Hev, Frank L, fjoedepeed of Amhersi 
spoke to the students on the qualities 
that go to make up the all-round mat. 
Hiring David as a standard, lie said in 
pari. "The trouble w'lh us today is not 

ihe decadence o1 llteretara and art bet 

Ihe detonation of men. We do not 
need more men but more man. The 
output of wealth has gr.-ally surpassed 
our output ol real men. Courage and 
bravery mean more than facing the 
cannon's mouth, it means living on the 
hiuh level. To get out into the world 
without KB effort and a steady purpose 
makes a worthless life. A brave man 
faces the issue sqiiaiely and thinks 

safely, »nd ins Intelligence will moie 

i lian outmatch numbers. 

Ciime, sue, and war are not neW 
things in lids world, but now they sue 
tasks and problems imposed upon man 

for solution instead ol being considered 

, supposed evils t.l be boinc lorcver by 

Frederick Hell ron 14, Edward E, War- the world as a form of punishment 
ren Tl William B, Stiles 'SKI, Everett They have now become burdens which 
H. Skinner 'IB. Walter E. ineebroote men ^^^^^^t^A^f. 
T3, Arthur V. Petit '18, Ralph T. .Veal «"»« • 
T3, Dana U. Merrill T7, William H. 



sion they will be required to remain i 
wsiTTCe-Tin.; Bnhth their cmibitmeiit 
privates or non-commissioned ollicers. 

The men in Ihe order of their appli- 
cations are: 

Roland 11. Patch '11. Paul W, Eatham 
T7, Charles R. Wilbur T7. Robert I). 
Ilawley '18, William I. Goodwin 'lx, 
Donald <i. Davidson '», David <>. M. 
Edes '18, Robert P. Cande '20, Wesley 
S. Sawyer T8, Adams N. McCbdlan T», 
Bergel it. RosequislT8,M.J. McN'ainuia 
'17, Stanley W. Hall TO, Edward \ 
Larrabel Tl, Joseph E. O'Uara 'U*. 
Hans A. Itostrom '17, Paul f. Hunne- 
well *18, Frederick W. Jerome Id, tileii 
H, Carrmh T'i, llurtou Gooffs* In, 
John W. T. Lesure 13, Dean W. Alden 
'19, Elton ,1. Manse! I T», Herbert J. 
Stack Tii, Harold C Hunter '19, Clifford 
A. Roe Hi, Ualph W. Fearing 'it, George 
N. Danforlh Ttt, Harold W. llyland 13, 
Alpha J, Flehul '15, Edwin P. Cooief 
T», Theodore H. Reuman '18, Raymond 
W. Hoynton Tit, Harold <i. Mattoon Td, 
Wallace f'. Forbush '13, Marshall O. 
Lampheiir T8, Homer C Darling Id, 



Sears '15, William II. Eoriiig "17, Clar- 
ence R. Phipps 18, fieorge B, Palmer 
'W, Charles U. Clough 17, William H. 
Lcontlnasd on pases I 



tasks thai icqiiirc self-sacritice Want 
is education t H is m»t the amouiil ol 
knowledge, but the developmeni of Its 
power for a purpose, and to know how 
to apply this knowledge to the h'mhest 
I end." 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
fruiu letters from the Aggie men at the 
front,] 

Nov. 3, 1917. 



Your last letter was a daudy and I 
ho|)c you had good luck with the bass. 
Your talking about a long sweet sleep 
hits me where I live, for I'm always 
ready to turn in here on the boat. One 
is agreeably tired at night, and it's a 
hard job to turn out at 5 a. m. these 
cold mornings. 

It must have been mighty pleasant up 
there on the lake and in the woods, and 
just what you needed to tone yon up 
for a hard year. I should have liked to 
be there to hear if i lie staunch democrat 
and Roosevelt republican became in- 
volved in an argument on Wilson's 
policies. 

We are still here in Provineetown 
alone of the fleet of patrol boats. The 
others couldn't stand the weather and 
are gone back to Boston. It has blown 
quite hard several times lately and we 
had two bad storms, but were fortu- 
nately in harbor at the time. Even 
then we dragged our anchor the last 
time. It is a grand sight to see the 
bailing schooners making for this har- 
bor before and during a storm. They 
round Cape Race and drive in, some- 
times with all sail set, and their hand- 
ling is superb I don't think there is a 
liner sight than a schooner heeled way- 
down with a bone in her teeth, sails 
cracking, and the white wash flying 
from her lee rail as she sweeps by. It 
stirs the blood. 

We were out with a submarine for 
two days last week, convoying herwhile 
she made some tests. We ran 40 miles 
off shore to get away from the lines of 
traffic and then stood by while she 
circled around submerged. That's one 
kind of ship I Wouldn't care to be on, 
for the air in them is terrible when they 
are submerged. 

College must be in full swing now, 
and I hope there are plenty of students. 
I haven't heard any news of the old 
place lately, but hope to.when you write. 
Sa m T utbil was drafted and called 



you do the tourist stunt in the army. 
We have had some mighty interesting 
experiences that some folks would 
have spent a year's salary on as tourists. 

We have had some time on the front, 
although we are behind the lines just 
at present. Shells whistling, aircraft, 
etc., all that stuff you fellows read 
about in the papers at home. 

I have met Don Francis '18 and Jim 
Day '17 over here with all their braid 
and trimmings. It's sure funny busi- 
ness. I do not regie! being here a bit 
and am perfectly satisfied with this ser- 
vice. It's great to be associated with 
such a mighty fine bunch of boys. God 
knows it will be a relief to see the good 
old U.S.A. again. I'd give anything 
to just see the college again for aday. 
OOBPOBAX Ai.mon W. Spaulding ('17) 
Sec. 39, U. S. A. Ambulance Service, 
American Expeditionary Forces, 
France via New York. 

Editor's note— Spauldiug joiued the 
Amherst College Ambulance Unit last 
spring and after a course of instruction 
at Allenlown, Pa. went "over-seas" the 
early part of the summer. With him is 
Fred V. Waugb '20. 



JAMES W. BRINE OO. 



Established over 40 years. 



286 Devonshire St. 



Boston 



Athletic and Sporting Goods 

Official Outfitters for M. A. C. 



Tennis Supplies 



Bathing Suits 



Camping Outfits 



away the last of the summer. He had 
been supervising gardens in Cobasset 
and taught two days in the high school 
before being called, 

•Duteh" Sl.euflie '16 is down here on 
a boat which came In last night. He 
has been patrolling in Maine, 

Well. I believe I'd better knock off 
and turn in, for it's near nine o'clock— 
two bells. 

**Bob" Boijeb '17. 
"Over-there," No?. S» 1917, 

I'm just crazy to know who's who and 
what's what at the college, and the gang 
that is back, so I am writing to see if I 
can get a raise out of some kind soul 
with a fountain pen and a Lew spare 
moments. For Pete's sake who is back ; 
how's everything going, etc, f 

Our gang here is enjoying life as 
much as could b* expected and just 
living for letters and news from home 
and college. It's a mighty good crew 
that 1 am with. 

We've been In the game for five 
months and (he novelty has long since 
worn off. We can get an order to move 
and take it as a mess call. Talk about 
touring France, well, I guess you might 
say, what we haven't seen are a few 
things worth seeing, for they do n«t let 



The "Slogan" for Aggie men seems to 
be "Stay on the Job." We hear this 
phrase from practically every Assembly 
speaker, from our president, and even 
members of the student body are re- 
peating it among themselves. It is 
without doubt the task of the hour. 

However, in spite of the earnest en- 
deavors to maintain a state of zeal and 
enthusiasm for the college work, there 
exists at this time, in the student body, 
a feeling of dissatisfaction, and this 
feeling is daily becoming stronger. 
Not only is it prevalent among the .stu- 
dents of the two upper classes, but it 
exists even more strongly among the 
sophomores. It is easily explainable 
why there is unrest among the juniors 
and seniors because a majority of them 
are of draft age, and consequently are 
subject to an early call. But, why 
should a spirit of discontent prevail so 
strongly among the sophomores '.' Only 
a very few of this class are subject to 
draft, and indeed the greatest desire to 
leave college or enlist is due, primarily, 
to a dissatisfaction with the courses of 
study. This is truly unfortunate. The 
sophomore class feels that such a jumble 
of zoology, physics, botany and a few 
other courses are thrown at them at the 
same time, that they are gaining com- 
paratively little by remaining in col- 
lege. No man can take such an assort- 
ment of facts, theories and ideas, as has 
been passed out to the sophomore class 
in the last eight weeks, and ever hope 
to al.sorb them all, much less to retain 
them. It is needless to argue the merits 
of a course if the students fail to grasp 
and retain its subject matter. The 
work of the sophomore year baa ad- 
mittedly been too difficult (o accom- 
plish in if weeks, and now it is ex- 
pected to accomplish it in nine weeks. 
It has been truly said that more men 
are flunked out of this college in the 
first term of their sophomore year than 
at any other time. But why not seek a 
remedy for this deplorable condition. 
There is a remedy for everything. In 
this case the cause is apparent, but 
why are the students so Bubmisslre to 
■uch conditions, and why are the mem- 
bars of the faculty so blind to the un- 
satisfactory results, that both parties 
willingly allow such an unsatisfactory 
arrangement of affairs to continuo? 
This is a time of great stress and a 
quick and efficient remedy is necessary, 
if it is expected to keep the men on the 



Military Uniforms and Supplies 




Football Basketball 



Hockey Track Soccer 



Baw Baw Coats, $12.00 up 

Brine's Sweaters Are Superior 



Campus Agent. E. J. MANSELL '19, Phi Sigma Kappa House. 



H. L. Rl'WSELL, Mirr.. MS 
K. M. Ill KKl M. 'li» 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 



i; u COLLINS, '19 
F. K COLB. t» 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates wantr 



Athletic Supplies and Drill Shoes 



JBWBLEHB 

The E. E. Millett Estate 



A roll line of Colleae Jewelry always In stock 
Broken Lentes replaced while yon wait 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



UNITY CHURCH 

PLEAiAHT StBKET. 

Regular Sunday Service at 10-45 A.M. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where e?ery student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



Send Flowers 

Help conserve the sugar and 

send her a box of 

flowers. 

Chrysanthemums, Roses, 
Carnations, Violets, Etc. 

urown on the Campas. 

Dept. of Floriculture 



Telephone 800 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNGH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 
The "Nonotuck ,, 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 
FIREPROOF 



RATES, $1.50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
—Proms — Our Specialty. 



P. J. BEHAN 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



job. It would be better to take three 
courses and get them well, than the 
present seven and get none of them 
right. I-et us hope that fatuity and 
students can get together ou this and 
make the next term worth while to 
those who wish to learn and retain. 

Donald H. Smitu '5J0. 



Sanitary Dept. 102nd Machine Qua Hat. 
American Expeditionary Forces 
via Hew York. 
France, Nov. 11, 1M7. 



I left Framingham the latter part of 
September for France, aud eventually 
arrived here, coming direct to the toast. 
The next move was by train from coast 
to border, and some trip. As far as I 
know, few of you have ever seen French 
railroads or cats, passenger or cattle, 
and never will want to see the cattle 
care. At leaBt I never will for I spent 
two days and two nights in one of the 
darn things, bouncing over the darned- 
est roadbedH you can imagine. When 
the French railroad builders come to a 
hill they go over it instead of through 
it ; and when they come to a valley they 
go down into it instead of bridging it. 
The back road from Amherst to Boston 
is like a billiard table compared with 
this country's railroads. Well, after 
those two rfild nights we arrived at a 
border town and unloaded in a pouring 
rain. Darkness fell then aud I started 
with the outfit to hike seven miles to a 
village where we were billeted in a 
barn— and such a hike. We tramped 
through mud and water, under heavy 
DVareOftta and full packs, and slept that 
night on hay in a leaky barn. With 
the help of Professor Mackimmies 
French I finally arrived at ray destina- 
tion. French distances don't appeal to 
me, and instead of milestones kilo- 
meters mark the distances. On hikes 1 
spend most of my lime figuring out how 
many good old U. 8. miles I'm travel- 
ling by computing these kilometers as 
five-eighths of a mile. Arriving at this 
village 1 am now established in an in- 
firmary. We take care of all the sick 
troops quartered here, and if I do say 
it, we have a mighty fine little hospital. 
M ■ iotrrcasea we transfer to the base 
hospital in the nearest city. 

The censor will not allow me to say 
much ahotit military matters, nor loca- 
tions of outfits, so news is rather scarce . 
You probably get more news about the 
war from the American newspapers 
than 1 can send yon, though 1 hear the 
rumble of the big guns every day. We 
have already bad snow and I haven't 
seen the sun for over ten days. Mud is 
everywhere. 

Send along a line whenever you can, 
for newt is what I live for just at 
present. 
Bebgt. Frederic Schkxkbmikuukk 1». 



AGGIE MEN IN MILITARY 

SERVICE NOW TOTAL 336 

Due to the recent awarding of com- 
missions at l'lattsburg and additional 
enlistments during the past few days, a 
more complete summary of the under- 
graduates and alumni in the service of 
their country has lieen compiled than 
w:.< jointed in the Nov.20tb issue of the 
< ni.uoiAN. These statistics are as 
accurate as possible up to Nov. 28th. 
Of a total of 186 men of the college, W 
are serving as commissioned officer* and 
289 in some other capacity, and of this 
number, a very large proportion are non- 
commissioned officers. There are 42 
men now engaged in over-seas service, 
nearly all being officers. 

A revised summary follows: 
(lags CommisBkined Others Total <>\er- 
i ntiuers Beal * 

1980 1 18 20 8 

1919 I W :l1 4 

HUH 21 46 88 11 

11.1T 20 88 TH H 

lit It! 7 89 88 1 

1910 4 16 80 4 
1914 « IX '-' 4 * 
1913 H 11 19 3 
1912 11 »< » 1 

1911 1 3 4<» 
191Q 1 10 
L909 2 13 
1908 2 ° 2 ° 
1007 3 3 
lWOfl 1 1<> 
1905 1 10 
1809 11<> 
1H07 1 2 3 t> 
1896 1 12 
1HM5 1 12 1 
1886 1 12 1 
1881 1 1 



Johnson Book Co. 

Agricultural; Books 
-:- Filing Cases -- 



AGGIE INN 

Run by Aggie Men 

For Aggie Men 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

The Highland Hotel 

( .truer of Hllluian and HarneH Street.*, three 
blocks from the Tnlon l>e|>ot, ia a modern hos 
telry run on the European Han. It Ujust a step 
frmii Main Htreet, away from the noise and dust, 
and yet In the center of the business district. 

Its n.oins'.aif well furnished and comfortable. 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water In e\eis room. Prices SI and up: rooms 
with bath uiimle) $1.50 and up. 

Iti excellent culBine and well ventilated din 
lug room maUrw a meal a pleasant memory— 
everything.of the blithest duality, well conked 
and served In the best possible manner 

Htay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
autii ipate..stft»ing there again. Music cmiv 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel. Springfield. Nats. 



Eats, 



Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



GOOD SERVICE 



■Come to us for 



M 



232 



330 



42 



JUNIOR MAJOR STATISTICS 

About 45 percent of the junior class 
have chosen practical agricultural 
courses for their majors, .such as animal 
husbandly, dairying. poultry ,and pomol- 
ogy. Agricultural economies seems to 
be the most popular major, 17 Juniors 
having chosen to major under lir.Cimee. 
Scientific courses rank second with 19, 
w hii«» hor ticultural cour ses and human 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



It lei have nine and five respectively, 

I'M miplete ligures follow: 

Agriculture 8, agronomy 1, animal 
husbandry 14, dairying 3, poultry 4, 
floriculture 3, forestry 1. landscape gar- 
dening 3, pomology 15, botany 2. chem- 
istry 12, entomology 4, microbiology 2, 
rural journalism 1 . agricultural econom- 
ics 17, agricultural education 2, rural 
social science 2. 



Inf., Co. < 

( aMF Goiwon, tJA,, 

Not. go, 1917. 

I wish I were writing W tell you thit 
I were coming back to college. I "ft. 
think of bow Id like to be In dear old 
"Aggie,'* however,!, should not be satis- 
fied to be there while so mauy of my 
fellows wereout in the "great, struggle. 

Little did I think las! spring that I 

would be where I ™ noW : J'"***™ 
not sorry that I'm in the 1, ig <•■ ' • 
I'm enjoying it T«y much and an irj 
ing to put my best into '«■ 1^> » ™ 
officially appointed a wrpo*. J» 
only goes to show that a .obiter wtl ta a 
little ''push" need not remain a prime 
verv long. 

I am planning to enter the U. *». . . 
samp which isto be formed here about 

June 5th. 

joint B, Moomk, iei». 



GIVING SPIBIT 
INVADES THE CAMPUS 

Although surrounded by an environ- 
ment which would hardly e<|tta1 that of 
the proverbial atiim»phere of a real 
honest -to-good n iss New Kngland Thanks- 
giving, the 30 or 40 men who remained 
on the campus over the short holidays, 
managed to have a real good time is 
celebration of the Goddess of Plenty. 
In i he first place. Miss Kennnedy Mtved 
the men at the Etttiog Hall with dinner 
which, according to one individual's 
vernacular, was "a prince of ■ iced."* 
In the late afternoon and eaily evening, 
after the processes of assimilation were 
well under way, a very informal party 
of student* and the members of the 
faculty, with their families 'not the stu- 
denla') was held !■ 'be l»riil Hall. Kec- 
reation and entertainment of all kinds 
was furnished for those from six to 
sixty, as dancing, card games and bas- 
ket ball for the "profs" and children. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

FOR forty yew* we have rendered faithful tervice. For forty 
year* we, have tried to make each year'* nrriee more neady 
ideal. Thi» untiring effort ha« built for u* not only The Wodd'i 
Urge* MaU Order Seed BuiineM, but aire a World Wide 
reputation for Efficiency and undisputed leaderdiip. The 
Fortieth Anmveriary Edition of Burpee** Annual, thm 
'Leading American Seed Catalog" ■ brighter and 
better than ever. It U mailed free. A portcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Bwp- Building. PWUdelpki- 



I 







Scbfllare's Stubio 

•flortbampton 




JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




/ 



1 

I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



HOARD OF EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. I.ANrilRAIi'l.H.Edltor in-Chief 
WESLEY S. BAWVBH '1*. ManuifiiiK Editor 



Associate Ei.itukk. 
AitTin i; n. BOWISN 'in 

ELIOT m. mi i r.M Mil 

ARTIM'U I.. (HANDI.EK M9 

MYltTON F. EVANS MB 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
RIRGERR. ROBEQIHBTM8, Huaineaa Manager 
HA Ml' EI. R. FEU KISS MM. Assistant Manager 
<. M. C'AMPBKLL'20. Advertising Manager 
JAMES r. MAJ'EEH "JO. rirculatlnn 

<;. ALFRED smith 'ao. rtn-iiiation 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, H cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aaaecond-clais matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 

Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Dm. 4. No. 8 



Aooik men are you trying to decide 
the all-important question of the hour 
on your own resources, or with the help 
of others ? If the former, you are to he 
commended: if the latter, wait a little 
while. Calm down and seek a quiet 
place away from everybody. There 
commune with yourself and after much 
thought and careful weighing of both 
sides of your problem, you make the 
decision. Doing this, you will feel bet- 
ter and bigger, have none to blame for 
poor counsel, and go your way with no 
regrets. 

Enlistment or draft '.' That is what 
we all face, but let us be sensible about 
it. 

Three years ago we would not have 
thought of actually entering military 
work in the midst of ourcollege careers. 
There was no cause then for such 
thoughts. Time and circumstance have 
changed affairs until today within the 
heart of every reai American there is a 
constant, ever-grdwing caTJ To duty. 
Duty !— There is the key to the whole 
situation! Shall we define duty to the 
world, duty to our country, duly to the 
state, and duty to those who are near to 
us shall w« define duty in terms of 
military enlistment and military ser- 
vlre? The spirit of the limes sways us 
to answer "yes" and I be same is lilting 
and proper if necessity demands it of us. 
Duty in a broader sense is doing that 
which we have to da today the very best 
that we know how. By so doing we are 
true to ourselves first, and being true to 
ourselves we get l he habit and cannot 
be other than true to everything that 
follows. We came to college with the 
express purpose of gelling a better edu- 
cation so that when we should take our 
riegreees we would have a greater 
capacity to serve. Is it not our present 
duty then to finish I he joti we have 
started first and look to the next when 
this is finished? The draft law is a 
fact } tl Is a method ; it is a means to 
an end; above all. it is honorable. 
Should we as individuals lake our falein 
our own hands and try to mold a differ- 
ent future f<>r ourselves than has been 
cut out for us*.' If the draft calls us, 
the government needs us and will assign 
us where we are most needed. Until 
that call come*, let us be calm, lei us 
see a great future ot service before us, 
let us prepare ourselves to (he utmost, 
let us stick to Did Aggie as loyal sons of 
service ! 



CAMPUS NOTES 

"Pete" Maltoou '16 was around col- 
lege Sat unlay. 

Leland .1. Croff '20 of Reading has 
pledged Q. T. V. 

Carl I. Iorio '20 has enlisted in the 
engineers' and reported at Camp Devens 
Dec. 4. 

The addition of several young pine 
trees to the southern entrance of the 
ravine has greatly increased the beauty 
ot i his wild garden spot. 

Wesley S. Sawyer '18 and Samuel B. 
Ferris '19, left Amherst Sunday noon for 
Chicago where they plan to attend the 
International Slock Show. 

George VV. Martin, instructor in bot- 
any last year, has been commissioned 
as second lieutenant at Fort Meyer, Va., 
and now is at Camp Greene. 

Frank D. Leary '19 was seen on the 
campus for a few minutes last Monday. 
He has been In the naval hospital corps 
at Newport ami has been transferred to 
the naval academy at Annapolis for a 
two month's training course. 

Victor Petit ex-'18, Company B.SOtfl 
Infantry, Camp Greene, Charlotte, 
N. <'., was recommended as a candidate 
from the cantontment for the third 
training camp. Hehas been acting as 
sergeant in his company. 

Lieutenants Harold M. Gore '13 and 
David Potter '16, were on the campus 
the first of last week direct from Platts- 
burg. Both will soon be in active ser- 
vice, "Dick" going to Camp Devens aud 
"Kid" Oore"over-tbere"lhe first part of 
January. 

Minor repairs seem to be the order 
these days. The chemical laboratory 
has been rejuvenated with a new layer 
of shingles on that part of t he building 
exposed to the public view. The Durfee 
plant house is being reglazed in several 
places in anticipation of an offensive by 
Jack Frost. 

"Bob" Westman '17 was around in bis 
old haunts over the week end. He is 
back looking up the latest "dope" on 
the third officer's training camp. Since 
graduation the old college cheer leader 
has been holding down a position with 
the P. S. D. A. Bureau of Markets in 



LOSS OF W. L. HARMOUNT 

IS KEENLY FELT BY ALL 

Not a day goes by on the campus but 
mention is made of W. L. Harruount. 
His labors with us are done, but the in- 
fluence of his life and character is ever 
present here. 

Mr. Harmount went to his home at 
the close of the second term laBl year 
for medical treatment fully expecting to 
resume his work after the recess. His 
illness became acute, and, although he 
seemed for a lime to rally, he died the 
twentieth of July at his home in Pine 
Orchard. Conn. Of his immediate rela- 
tives he leaves behind father, mother, 
and four brothers. 

He waB buried the following Sunday 
in the old cemetery in the city of New 
Haven in view of his beloved Alma 
Mater, Yale college. M. A. 0. was 



Albany, N. V. 

"Been having any trouble with your 
engine lately?" The men in Engineer- 
ing 75 and 7fl under Professor Gunnesa 
have been enjoying all sorts of expe- 
riences and assimilating portions of 
knowledge while working with all types 
and makes of engines in the shops, 
ft on* tractor to Met/. 

Lieutenant Harlan N. Worthley ex-'18 
of Greenwood and Hiss Ruth S. Wood, 
bridge of Somerville were married Sun- 
day evening, Dec. 2, at the Winter Hill 
Baptist church, Lieut. Worthley, who 
was commissioned at the recent Platts- 
burg training camp, Is perhaps best 
known as the "Nightingale" of the col- 
lege, because of his vocal ability, espec- 
ially as a soloist and connected with the 
Glee Club, of which he was leader. 



POM CLUB MEETING 

The Pomology Club extends an invi- 
tation to everyone interested to attend 
the meeting Thursday at 7-80 p. m. at 
Wilder Hall. There will be several 
speeches, by seniors, on orcharding, fol- 
lowed by refreshments. At the meet- 
ing last week a constitution was 
adopted and two committees chosen. 
The social committee — Slough *18 chair- 
man. Hiss Brigham in. and MJas Wells 
'19. The program committee — PraU *18 
chairman, Howes and Canlett '18, and 
« r«.v.e and Hart well '19. 



represented at the funeral by Professors 
Machmer and Mackimmie. 

Mr. Harmount was born in New 
Haven, Jan. 15, 1881. He graduated 
from Yale university iu 1903. He was a 
member of the Pbi Beta Kappa and Phi 
Kappa Phi societies, and of the Com- 
mons Club at M. A. C. He came to us 
in 1911 from the Kiskiminetas Springs 
School, Penn. During the past two 
years, in addition to his regular work, 
he was engaged in compiling and edit- 
ing a Scientific French Reader intended 
primarily for students in agriculture and 
the sciences related to it. At the time 
of his death, this work was almost com- 
pleted ; and it is hoped that arrange- 
ments may yet be made whereby it may 
be published. It will be not simply a 
memorial of his scholarship. It will re- 
mind us of his uprightness and courage. 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unlets de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will— will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Colledian, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 




Brains do the designing ! 

Skilled hands, the cutting. 

That's one reason why our 
clothes fit. 

Sizes to fit every type and 
shape. 



Everything men and boys wear 



MAIL ORDERS FI 



Rogbrs Pbet Company 



Hrosdwar 
at 1 8th St. 

Riosdwsy 
st Warren 



"Tba 

Font 

Corners'* 

new York crrr 



Broad war 
St Mtfa St. 

FlftB A ▼•. 
St 41»t Rt. 



IT'S CHEAPER 



to Buy a 



0£ LAVAL 



Von get by far the greatest actus! VALUE 
for jronr money when you tray a I>e Laval— 
BECAUSE It will give yoa much better and 
longer SERVICE than any other separator 

The greater durability of the I »■ Laval, It* 
cleaner skimming, easier running, greater 
capacity and lew cost for repairs, make the 
price of the "cheap- 
est " machine OB As 
market In reality most 
exorbitant compared 
with that of the De 
Laval. 

Not the first cost of 
s separator, bat the 
amount and quality of 
the service It wilt give 
you, thou hi determine 
your choice. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




185 ItitoA nw A V 
NEW YORK 



20 E. Ma nmoif St. 
CHICAGO 



Northa mpton Players 

"HIT THE TRAIL HOLUDAY" 



This Week 



Though he was constantly tortured in 
body, he gave us a iheerful front and 
labored on without t-«.-iu plaint and with) 
a jest and vlu.ir that put us all m shame. 
Surely it is Rood that he has I n 

with us. May M. A. C. long be able to 

attract anil hold such men. 

DELTA PHI GAMMA 

ADOPTS NEW POLICY 



Delta I'hi Gamma, the college sorority, 
has been opened to all four year course 
women students. This has been dune 
in ,,rth>rto briny: all I he co-eds under 
uue organisation where they may enjoy 
equal social advaniayes. An invitation 
has been extended to all the youm 
women of the three upper elftsaei ami 
as a result the following were taken la- 
t„ the organization: 1918 - Elizabeth K. 
Additon, Newton; Harriett F. llilliker, 
Lynn: Margaret K. Hlmau, Schyler 
Falls, N*. V. 1919— Priseilla Knowlton, 
Uoxbury. 1920 Marion K. Earley, 
Newton; Helen 8. Millard, Susan A. 
.smith, and Mary T. Viyez/i. all of (.real 
Barriugton. 



CORRECTION 

In the last issue of the Coi.lk.oian in 
,., nnect urn with the announcement of 
the appointment of A. L. Dean as 
Poultry Club agent, it was stated or im- 
plied that poultry club work was taken 
up this year for the tirst time in this 
state. Although no poultry club spec- 
ialist was employed here previous to 

Mr. llamct>ei's appointment last .Janu- 
ary, poultry club work has been carried 
on by the extension servio continuously 
since 1913. 



THE AIM 



HENDERSON GETTING 

A TASTE OF WAR 

Elliot Henderson '17 commissioned as 
second lieutenant at I DC first IMattsburg 
camp of this year is perhaps the first 
Ajjgie undergraduate to get into the 
trenches of France. He is now leader of 
a platoon with four days of duty and 
eight days behind the lines. 



1921 SETS NEW CUSTOM 
Nineteen twenty-one has set the pre- 
cedent of a new custom, that of wearinu 
their military uniforms bomeot when 
visiting in the neighboring towns. It 
really seems good to see that there are 
s.-mc in the class with a little original- 
ity, and perhaps after all there may yet 
be hope for I hem. 

ECONOMICS CLUB MEETING 

The Economics club has been Invited 
to meet at the home of Mr. Wilkinson, 
7 Phillips Street. f«»r their meeting this 
week Wednesday. The lime will he 
tf-30 as usual. 

Instead of a Junior Prom, the junior 
elass of the Pniversity of Wisconsin 
held an inexpensive Liberty dance, in- 
vciing the proceeds in Liberty Bond*. 
In a large mass meeting, the women 
students voted to oppose all formal 
parties during the year. 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best dressed 
mCn To y kee r p C ouH?nes of young men's togs so utterly smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're tpei iali*ts of twenty- 
five years' expeiience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart "trench" wereoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coat made, 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 

At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

. mi _i„ . Amherst 

Campion s Block, 

SEE CAMPION FIRS T 



William J.Sweenejr '19, of Dorchester, 
captured second place in the annual 
cross-country run held Thanksgiving by 
the Northampton Y. M. C. A. HnM 
place went to Shaw of Williston. Last 
year Sweeney placed third. 



S. S. HYDE 

jeweler rar»«t 0|>Ho««" 

1,1 Pleasant StMM 

OmlUtr Prescriptions Killed. H.ohen lenses 

Ai-eurntpli' Kenlnred. hnc WatHi Repair* 

Inu Proml.tO ami Hkllfully l»on«-. 

HaUafattlon »;iiar»iiteeu- 




Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Maaa. 

Office Hours: 1-S, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 

Croysdale Iran 

sot Tit RADurr, mash. 

Good Beds and Good Things 

to Eat. 

Telephone ktWs-W. Holyoke. 

E.B.DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block. Amherst, Mass. 

QtHce Hoars: » to 12 »■ •»•■ '- 80 •»»*•*« 



HIV VIM It 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

etc., of 

ft, N. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I rail st the Dorms and Fraternity Hooaes. 

" BIDE-A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And other good thing* to eat 
MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 41S-W 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 



Next to Campion's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 



RAHAR'S INN 



pton. 



Massachusetts 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



Who advertise in this paper 

HAVE SOMETHING OF INTEREST 

For the Student body. If they 
hadn't, they wouldn't be here. 

TAKE INTEREST IN THESE ADVTS. 
And patronize our patrons. 

ITS DOLLARS AND CENTS FOR YOU 

And dollars and cents for the 
advertiser. 




AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Agents for K«i Typewriter 
P. M. CURRAN C. F. DYER 



A new ear schedule to Holyoke. 

Did you see that special sale of scratch 



What will be Tuesday's show at the 
Movies? 

Sliwprtin Coats at *8,M. 

Jort . ftw of ib* tnta*. of interest to«d 
in the "Cm-Litei Ait's" Adfertisinf Crimr 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main Street, Masonic Building, 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Closed only from / A. M. to 4 A. M. 

The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

Jobber* of Wrought Iron and Brass Plr*. 
VsI»«hi and KlttlfHf" for Wesro. Water and 
(laa.Aibestosand Magnesia Holler and Pip* 
Coverings. Pipe* <it toSketeh. MillHupplleS 
Engineers and loniradors for Wearri and 
M„T Water Heating. Automatic Sprinkler 
iwtems. Holler and Krtgine Connections. 

Holyoke, Maws. 

PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan 



MARSH'S SANITARY 



Students' Furniture 

RUC1S AND CARPETS 

- E. D. MAKBII KHTATE — 



K«i. ■!■••«"■ HM 

Stephen Lank Folabb. iia*.» 

sfAMurAtrrrjitma jswiLiw 
1BO BROADWAY. KBW YORK 



OLUB AND COriLlWB 
PINS AND HINtiS * 

SOLD, »?!,.▼»»* AWT» RROMSN M»liAIJ» 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

OMtl op.lt 1> 



Northom 



7M Main St. 
1 »t « »■ » . 



Mi 



Writing Paper 

With Class Numerals lid College Sills 

AH kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



• 



) , 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



MIX K.MAX'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** HAMI' »» 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN 

305 LAMBIE BLD8., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone 



OWN HALL 



Wednesday, 
Dec. 5 



Thursday, 

Dec. 6 
Double Hill 



Friday. 
Dec. 7 



Saturday. 
Dec. 8 



Harold Lock wood and May 

Allison in "The Hidden 

Children" 

Pearl White in "Fatal Kiati" 

Drews in "The Awaken- 

U fefMelene Mi nor" 

Fannie Ward in "Betty to 

the Rescue" 

and 

Theodore Rohert* in "Mr. 

Cres of Monte Carlo" 



Monday, 
Dec. 10 



Ben Christie in "Blind Jus- 
tice," 7 parte, 
Paramount Pirtograoh 

Bray Cartoon 

Edith Storey and Antonio 

Moreno in ''The Caotaia 
of the Grey Horse Troop" 
_ "The Fighting Trail " 
Pathe Hews Big V Comedy 

Anita Stewart and Bobby 
Connelly | n "The Sus- 

. ^ JP ec *«" « P*r*S- 
Pathe News 

Paramount Comedy 



Tuesday, 
Dec. 11 



No Pictures ... 
Lecture Course 



COMING Geratdlntt Farrar in "Tht 

Woman God Forgot WONDER. 

FULt SPECTACULAR I I 



What's Stuff ? 



Why : It's sometimes junk and sometimes It's 
corking good eating. 



The things the Dairy Lab. has 
for sale are corking good stuff*. 

There's Individual Boxes of Ice 
Cream for 10c, with a tin spoon 
thrown in. 

And Cheese! You don't have to 
buy it by the pound, either. 

The first door to your right in 

FLINT LAB. 



There are Seven Good Keasonswhy you should 
buy you» 



COAL 



or 



C. R ELDER 

COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk down town and create an appetite. 
Here is where yon tind the pies mother makes. 

Good Service and Reasonable Prices 



ScDool and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St., Northampton Mass,., 

and South Hadley. Mass 

These Studios offer the l.cst skilled 
artists <tnd most mntplrte 

equipmr.ii obtainable 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS \ND POULTRY DRR^SPRS 

WIIOLKHALK OXI.V 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau 

sages, Poultry, (iame, Butter, Cheese, 

Eggs, Olive Oils. 



Blackatone, North and North Centre .Streets, 
BOSTON nASSf 



NEWS FROM WASHINGTON 

BROUGHT BY THE DEAN 

Dean Lewis viBited Washington last 
week in an attempt to determine (he re- 
lation between the agricultural colleges 
of (be country and the next military 
draft; but on t lie whole, the net result ,as 
far as anything definite could be deter- 
mined, was very unsatisfactory. Presi- 
dent Butteriield prepared a Bet of ques- 
tions of which he wished direct answers 
and these Dean Lewis attempted to get 
before the War Department. These 
questions, which are very tentative ami 
yet vital to all agricultural college men 
were answered by President (iarlield, 
chairman of the fuel committee and the 
secretary of Brigadier-General Crowder. 
The answers were very unsatisfactory in 
view of the earlier plea of the govern- 
ment in urging all men to remain in col- 
lege as long as possible. The questions 
and their answers, which were read to 
the student body in the form of a report 
by the Dean at the Monday chapel ser- 
\ ices, are as follows: 

1. Under the new classifications, 
would not college men normally come 
under (lass I, division I ■ 

Yes, inexpert men. 

2. Are military enlistments allowed 
after Dec. Iff If so, for what forms of 
service? 

Positively none for registered men. 

•I. tan there be no ruling (bat men 

who bave enlisted in the R. O. T. C, in 

college should not be subject to draft 

until such lime as they are accepted 

into the Olhcer's Reserve or rejected 

from it, for the reason that according to 

the government scheme of things, the 

It. < ». T. ('. men in college aie in training 

just as much as though thev were in 

some military camp :' 

All men of age are subject to the 
draft. 

4. Into what classification would our 
undergraduates come if they are candi- 
dates for farm laborers next summer, if 
they are candidates for expert service 
next summer, such as garden super- 

liMll'» f 

1 ach case must be decided on its 
merits and the local district boards 
will make (he classification 
ft 



10. Is there not some way by which 
undergraduates in agricultural colleges 
can be allowed to finish the college 
course '.' 
No. 
In commenting upon the situation as 
it confronted the college man President 
Butteriield said, 'The whole thing is so 
big that individuals hardly count. 
When I first read the answers to these 
questions, I put myself in the place of 
an undergraduate and was of the mind 
that the best thing to do was to enliit 
at once after hearing so much about 
agriculture's need for men and the 
plea to remain in college in spite of 
what happened. However, a sec- 
ond thought has modified it and I 
asked myself several questions. What 
does the government want me to do? 
and duty comes in answering that ques- 
tion aright. Is enlistment more honor- 
able than draft ? I should say no. The 
draft is the law of the land and it is for 
the good of all that eulistment oppor- 
tunities are being closed to all volun- 
teers. The government is working for 
the benefit of the majority and like all 
laws is bound to be unjust to some. 
Those guiding our destiny want the men 
to be available and come together so 
they may be put just where they are 
most fitted. Is it more patriotic to wait 
or enlist ? My feeling has grown that it 
is (he big thing for the men to wait and 
take what comes. 

College men are experts and should in 
the majority of cases not be in Class I 
and according to informal ion in another 
column they should have an opportunity 
to finish at least this year. The under- 
graduates it seems are in no danger of 
being called except by advent tire. 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Go. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



ESTABLISH KI> 1846 



iESl. EMPIRE B0 N L 5ls and 



C&r pen-tar & AAorehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place. 



Mm 



What are the practical guarantee* 
"I classification to undergraduates who 
are capable to expert agricultural ser- 
\ i<e and leadership as a war service, as 
over against military service T If these 
men could classily inf'lasses Illand IV, 
at about what dales would they probably 
be reached lor draft for military service 
in case they could not be continued in 
agricultural service? 

After Dec, 15th a questionnaire will 
be sent to each registered man 
and the classification will be based 
upon his answers. No one can 
predict the date on which the dif- 
ferent classes will be called. 
0. Kvcn under the draft, could not 
students be permitted to stay in college 
until the end of the present short col- 
lege year (May 1) and then go into a 
draft camp? 
No, 

7. Will men physically unfit for the 
Officer's reserve be drafted, or can they 
be admitted to other forms of service? 

They may be drafted. 

8. U there any new registration con- 
templated:' 

Nothing olficlal announced, 

9. Has the applicant for admission to 
the the January camp opportunity to 
withdraw At what date? 

He may withdraw his application 
Dec, 1st and may withdraw his 
nomination at least before Jan. 
5th, 



HOCKEY WORK STARTS 

A meeting in ihe interests of varsity 
hockey was held Monday after chapel 
with 30 men in attendance. Prof. Hicks 
and UiehardBon 'in. spoke to the men 
about the splendid schedule which had 
been arranged. It was definitely an- 
nounced that practice would begin im- 
mediately. It will be held every after- 
noon at 8-30. The possibilities of Fresh- 
men being eligible for the varsity sun ad 
Ws&also di srnwen-. ■ 



FORESTRY DEPANTMENT NOTES 

Prof. \V. 1). (lark of the department 
of forestry has been in Boston for sev- 
eral weeks where he is employed with 
the New England Fuel Administration. 
On account of the shortage of coal, a 
special effort is being made to secure' a 
largely increased supply of cord wood 
for fuel purposes. Professor Clark is 
conducting this campaign for the state 
of Massachusetts. In the meantime 
his courses have been taken over for 
the present term by Prof. F. A, C. 
Smith of the department of Landscape 
Gardening. 

t, W. Johnston *19 has been employed 
as foreman on the Mt. Toby forest, and 
has moved into the "Old Torrey Farm." 
The building has been repaired on this 
place, which is now a part of the Mt. 
Toby demonstration forest. Work has 
already begun in cutting the diseased 
chestnut trees on the forest tract and 
the entire project begins to assume the 
aspect of practical forest operationg, 

*14.-Harold W. Black is with the 
Moon Nursery corporation of White 
Plains, N. Y. He passed a Civil Serv- 
ice examination for landscape engineer 
and forester for the city of Trenton, N. 
J. in August; but because of the posai- 
hie chances of being drafted, be could 
notjaccept the position. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's a 
"dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 




MERRITT CLARK & CO., aS' 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Bescb, Lincoln and Kingston Sts , 
BOSTON, riASS. 



Only two block! from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and easily reached from North Station 
by Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and business centre, 
also to the theatres and places of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the Best 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 



PR 



Are shown. 

OGRAM CHANCES DAILY 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The Rexall Store 



POINTS CONCERNING THE 

2ND DRAFT CLEARED UP 

As the time limit approaches, Dec. 15, 
set as the last date of volunteer enlist- 
ment in the armed forces of the nation, 
the undergraduate body has acquired 
an attitude of uncertainty regarding 
just what the men next to be called into 
service are to be up against in the next 
draft. 

The recent articles in the newspapers 
and periodicals have been the basis of 
much doubt and confusion in the minds 
of the men. The following facts have 
been condensed from the Official Uul le- 
t-in published by the Committee on Pub- 
lie Information. 

In the llrst place, the younger BW 
have no cause whatsoever for exhibit- 
ing the consternation which has been 
shown amoug them since the announce- 
ment of probable draft of men from 18 
to '21 years of age. This announcement 
was at the most a mere detail of an ac- 
count dealing with the new draft. No 
official word lias lieen received of any 
BUch draft, and even if there Bhould be 
one it would come after the second draft. 
All exemption claims aud discbarges 
are no longer valid after Dec. 15 

A mailed questionnaire will be sent to 
each registrant ami these will determine 
the class in which he is to be placed. 
When the next call for men is made, they 
will be called by classes: when Class 1 
is exhausted, Class II will be called 
upon, etc Men shall stand in the order 
to be called by the first great drawing. 
In brief, the five classes are made up 
as follows: 

Class I— Men immediately available 
for military service, i. e., single men, 
married men whose removal will not 
disturb the adequate support depend- 
ents and unskilled labor. 

Class II — Men who can be taken with- 
out disturbing the support of any de- 
pendant and skilled industrial and agri- 
cultural labor. 

Class III— Men with dependents other 
than by marriage, city, state, and gov- 
ernment employees, and men who have 
specialized themselves or who occupy 
pivotal positions. 

Class IV— Married men with wife and 
childien dependent on daily labor for 
support and no other reasonably ade- 
q u ate^ap^r^avalTable, and~treaTln of~ 
necessary agricultural and industrial 
enterprises. In this class are men who 
will be taken as a last resort. Before 
that class is reached, it is perfectly safe 
to say that by the addition of those who 
have reached their twenty-first birthday 
since registration day and perhaps add- 
ing the classes of IS and 10 and 20 year 
old men, there will be two or three mil- 
lion more men made available and thus 
save Class IV. 

Class T— Comprises the field of all 
absolute exempts; officers of states or 
the r.S. : ministers, divinity students, 
persons in military or naval service, 
aliens and enemies and persons morally, 
physically, permanently, or mentally 
unfit. 



THIS IS JUST THE WEATHER FOR A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Ours are going fast but we still have some good ones. 

$6.50 to $24.00 

We have just received a new line of 

Reversible Custom Made Shirts 

that are worth the once over. 

Prices - $150 to $5.00 

New Neckwear 50c to $1 .50 Flannel Shirts all prices Freshnan Toques 75c 

Suits and Overcoats from $12 to $25 






SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 




DAVENPORT 



The unsurpassed eating house for -Aggie" men and their friends. 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 



Mrs. J. K.. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



ilii- 8 — -e—Wawmm iMM 



Drugs 
Sodas 

Cigars 

Candy 



Mass. 



DR. THOMAS TO SPEAK 

The speaker at Sunday chapel will be 
Dr. .I«»hn Martin Thomas, l*resident of 
Middlebury college, Middlebury, Vt., 
instead of Professor Borden who has 
b**0 previously announced, I>r. Thomas 
is a graduate of Middlebury eollegt, has 
received an L. L. D. at the I'niversiiy of 
Vermont and also a D. D. at both Dart- 
mouth and Amherst, and is a contribu- 
tor to the Independent and The Nation 
on religious subjects. He has been 
President since 1908 and for fifteen years 
previous was pastor at an Eaat Orange, 
K, J., church. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

wriie today tor prtoea o« 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 The IfliHi ri™TtStmmi+r4tt*\MtT Jaw 1917 

Ask For Our Crop Books. We Want Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 



o- 



Arldreaa Asenoy »*■»««•«««* 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

SubtMlfcrj of the American A#rtGwrtnr*l C&emtcal 0», 

51 CHAMBERS STREET • • ■ MEW TOW CITY 



1 



I 




T.tBRAI 






& 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1917. 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



1 ('(mi iiniKil from page 1] 



114 



Agricultural Economics, 50, S. II 
Sophomore Tactics 25, Drill Hall. 

Fhidav, DCC, 14, l!tl7. 
7-30 lo»-45 a. m. 
Pomology 50, F. H, F 
Pomology 75, W, H. B 

Sophomore Chemistry 25, C. L. 
Freshman Hygiene, Drill Hall 

9-55 to 12-10 a. m. 
Animal Husbandry 75, S. II. 102 
Economics and Sociology 75, S. 11. 31H 
Rural Sociology, 75. F. H. < 
EngliBh 00, S. H. Ill 
(Jerman 50, F. H. G 
Public Speaking 50, S. II. C 
Spanish 50, Drill Hall 
Sophomore Drawing 25, W. II. 
Freshman French 1 and 4, Drill Hall 
Freshman German 1 and 4, Drill Hall 

1-00 to 8-15 p. K, 

Forestry 75, F. II. II 
Veterinary 75, V. L. B 
Dairying 50. F. L M 
Horticultures", W. H. B 
Sophomore Botany 25, C. U. A 

3-25 to 5-40 p. m. 
Military Science 75,',V. L. B 
Sophomore Physics Lab. Drill Hall 
Freshman Agriculture I A.toL.,C. U. A 
and Horticulture i M. to Z.,K. B. D 

Saturday, Dkc 15, 1917. 
7-30 to 9-45 a. m. 

Agronomy 50, S. H. 114 

Landscape 50, VV. H. A 

Chemistry 60,',C. L. 

Physics 50, P. L. B 

Zoology 53, E. B. K 

Sophomore Animal Husbandry 25, F. L.M 

Freshman Tactics 1, Drill Hall. 

9-65 to 12-10 a. m. 

Military Science 50, Drill Hall 
French 50, F. H. C 
Supervision Special, F. H. F 
Rural Engineering 25, S. H. 114. 

Any examination not scheduled above 
most be arranged for by individual 
appointment with the instructor in 
charge of the subject. 

In the event of unavoidable conflict 
for students having repeat subjects, 
the examination scheduled for the lower 
class must take preaederjeer 



SIXTY SEVEN MEN APPLY 

(Continued from pass lj 



Hatfield 15, Jared B. Thomson '09, 
Henry J. Wood, 14, George K. Babbitt 
'18, Warren 8. Hathaway 21, Thomas E, 
Carter '18, William C. Sanctuary *li, 
Harold B. Day *19, Francis W. Whitney 
*18, Chester A. Bishop *16, Raymond B, 
Willoughby '1M, Robert C. Westman '17, 
Douglas T. Newbold 19, Stephen M. 
KiehardsoD '18, Robert L. Boyd *18. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

*96.— H, W. Lewis has been engaged 
in the construction work of Camp Han- 
cock. 

'16.— Charles H. Fernaid, who has 
been engaged in the campaign against 
the while pine blister rust around this 
vicinity, has been called to the Naval 
Base Hospital at Newport. 

'16.— Fred VV. Jerome is spending a 
few days on (he campus renewing old 
acquaintances after leading a strenuous 
lift of a farmer since graduation. 

U7.— Lieutenant Arthur K. Williams 
and Miss 1 1 ;»/••! Wyetb were married at 
Newark, New Jersey, Nov. 17, "Art" 
is at Camp Greene, N*. C. 

*17 — Boyee ]■ a 2nd class seaman at 
the Charlestown Navy Yard, 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Pudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



CIGARS 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Associate Alumni, (J. A. Peters, Secretary — 454-W 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, H. M. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403-M 
on-Athletic Association," 



The College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



HT E. RoT>bins, Manager - ^ res. 62-VV 

H. L. Russell, President — 416 

C. G. Mattoon, Manager— 8338-W 

W. S. Sawyer, Manager — 543 

J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 

F. H. Canlett, President— 8338 - W 

D. M. Lips hi res, Manager — 416 

E. M. Buffum, Manager— 8338-W 

R, L. Boyd, President — 416 

II. L. Russell, President— 1 19- R 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8374 



CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



—AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

If, A. C. for Holyoke 7-20 and hourly 
until 1 1-20 P. M. 

M. A, C. for Amherst 6-20,6-45, 7* 2 °> 7"S°» 
8-05, 8-20, then 20 mm. and 35 mm. 
after the hour until 10-20 P. M. Other 
cars at 1 1-50 a. m.. 3-50, 5-50, 7-50, 9-50, 
10-50 P. m . and a last car at 11-20 P. m 

Amherst for M. A. C. 605. 630, then 
hail-hourly until 800 a. m., 8-15, 9-15, 
then 15 min. and 30 min. alter the hour 
until 11-30 P. M. Other cars at ia-00 
noon and 4-00, o^oo^oo.to^ooT*. M. and 
a last car at 12-30 p. M. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rates 



Amherst Co - op. Laundry 

HiRh-Grade College Work 




Shirt*, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain Wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



10-15c 
. 2 I-2c 

2 l-2c 
per do*. 48c 
per dnx. 30c 



Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 suits far 91.00 
Dry (Meaning and Pressing, $130 a Suit 



All bill* IMFillile :it < dIIi-u'i- HtiHi- ;iinl pink 
left there wilt receive prompt »ttptitliin. 



G, K. Babbitt 'i 7, Alpha 5>igiiia Phi House ; F. E. CoLijR.'ao, College Store 



lilHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Gents' KurnlMiliiits Ticket s> »te m 

II AMI TV S THE f T 

The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

10 Mile* Of trackage .Todern 
Equipment Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire Hist, 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 





DEC 12191 




MASSACHUSETTS AG K I CULTURAL COULEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December II. 1917. 



No. 9 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 
ANNOUNCEDBYMANAGER 

Eleven Games Scheduled, the First 

to be Jan. 5, with Conn. Aggie. 

Two Open Dates. 



BATCHELDER ELECTED 

MANAGER OF FOOTBALL 

New Man Expects to Arrange Attract- 
ive Schedule for Next 
Season. 



[SENIORS' PERFORMANCE 

APPRECIATED BY MANY 

Wineteen-eighteen8t»ge6tnrs Appear 
In Minstrels and Panto- 
mime Acts. 



Aggie's tentative basketball schedule 
will consist <.t eleven games as arranged 

by Manager Chapman at tbe pressol 

time. Two dates are slill open and a 
game with Rhode Island is still pend- 
ing. About the strongest aggregation 
which the M. A C. men will have to 
face will be the Dartmouth quintet, a 
new team on the schedule. Aniot g 
other new teams which will be seen on 
the Aggie Bool will be Stevens Institute 
of Sew York and Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute. 

This year's schedule will be somewhat 
heavier than the one which the Aggie 
five carried last year. Beside the in- 
crease of at least three games strongei 
teams will be opposed. The men will 
play five games away from home, tbe 
remainder being staged in tbe Drill Hall. 
As yet there has been no one elected 
to captain the team -, Forrest Grayson, 
who was to have lead the quintet, is 
now serving with United States forceB 
St Ayer in I he military police. 

Although there is only one letter man 

back, MeCarthy.aforward.it unexpected 

a that there will be much valuable mater 

ial from the classes of nineteen-nineteen 

y and nlnet^en-twenty. 

3 Dole 5 who has recently coached 

I wo ampionshlp basketball teama in 

out is to return to coach the M. A. 



Stewart P, Batchelder T«, of North 
Beading was elected manager of the 
1U1H varsity football team ai the con- 
clusion of the chapel services of Fri- 
day, Dec. 7th. Uatcheld. <r was assistant 
manager during his sophomore year, 
lie is among the most popular men of 
his class and linds an environment iu 
all college activities. He is a member 
of the College Senate, a Junior member 
of the informal committee, he won his 
place on his class basketball team last 
year, was a member of the varsity base- 
ball squad last spring and this fall he 
won bis numerals on his class relay 
team. In class affairs he has held sev- 
eral offices. He is a member of the Q. 

i'. V. fraierii'ty. 



afsi ty . Fraef fee wTT 

. . 17, 1917. 

The schedule: 

turday. .Ian. 5 -Connecticut Aggie at 

Amherst 
Tuesday. Jan. *— Dartmouth at Amherst 
Saturday. Jan. 12 Worcester Polyteeb, 

at Worcester 
Saturday. Jan. 1»-Kew Hampshire at 

Amherst 
Saturday, Jan. 2fl-Open 
Friday, Feb. I - Stevens Institute at 

Amherst 
Saturday , Feb.2 Dartmouth at Hanover 
Saturday. Feb. f-New Hampshire at 

Durham 
Saturday, Feb. 18-Woreester Polyteeb. 

at Amherst 
Saturday, Feb. 28 -Rhode Island at 

Amherst 
Friday, Mar. I— Connecticut Agfrie at 

Storns 

Saturday, ilar. 2— open 

Saturday. Mar. "-Rhode Wand (pend- 
ing) at Amherst 

PROF. HECHT MARRIED 

Prof. August <i, llccht. head of the 
department of ti..riculture and Miss 
Alice M. Neville of fVwanee, 111., were 
married Monday afternoon Dec 1U, at 
the Methodist parsonage, Aftera short 
wedding tOW Prof, and Mrs. Hecht will 
live at S North Pleasant St., Amherst. 



ALPHA SIGMA PHI SERVICE FLAG 

Still another service rlag has appeared 
,,n the campus. This is the Alpha 
Sigma Chi Hag with fourteeu stars. The 
list of men in service, which includes 
only those who were in college when 
war was declared, is as follows; 

1917. 
Day. Lieutenant U. 8. A. France. 
>quires, Lieutenant I". S. R. 
Artillery. 

1018. 
Kennedy. Aviation. 
Maginnis, Lieutenant U. S. K. 
M.-vnihaa, Li'"'* 11 " 11 tT. 8. B. 
Chambers, Aviation. 
Gasser, Infantry. Ayer. 
Grayson, at. P., Ayer 



Field 



Woodward. Infantry, Ayer. 
Thompson, Infantry, Ayer, sergeant. 
191». 

Sedgwick, Aviation. 
Baxter, Infantry, Ayer. 
Leary. Naval Hospital, Newport. 
U„we. Infantry, Ayer, 



"Reveu of 1918." put on by the senior 
class, filled Stockbridge ball with SOnfl 
and mirth for two hours last Saturday 
night. The first number whs a colored 
minstrel show. Babbitt. Preble. Popp 
and Boyd were endmett; Til ton, Bieh- 
ardson. Mower, llunnweil, Smith and 
Haines composed the rest of the circle 
with Uussell as interlocutor. A chorus, 
composed of Chapman. Edes, R..sequist, 
Schlough, t lark. Leonard, luring, Prat I, 
La.wre.nee and Bruce, assisted. 

After an overture by the mandolin 
club sextet and an opening chorus by 
the full strength of the company, the 
features of the act were started by 
Babbitt, who *»ng"All Bound Bound. " 
Followed "Auntie Skinner's" by Preble, 
"Prosit" by Tiltoii and ibadouhle quar- 
tet. "That's the Kind of a Baby" by 
Hunnewell, an "Hawaiian Specialty" 
by Uaines, "Sweet Emmelina" by Popp, 
and a "Topical Song" by Boyd. These 
feat u rex, which were haersperaed with 
some clever hits aud with minstrel fun, 
were received enthusiastically aud re- 
peatedly encored. The ' Finale'' by the 
entire cast tiltingly ended the lirst part 
of the entertainment. 

After some banjo stuff by Haines and 
a seiies of gymnastic stunts by Babbit, 
Gilbert llall.represented byRussell,*'. T. 
Smith, S.S Smith and Preble, produced 
their gem, "Siugs from Sing Sing." an 
original skit of considerable merit, 
which closedTle evefVtfnir - 

Financially, as well as artistically. 
the "Reveu" was a decided success, 
and was much appreciated by those In 
attendati.-e 



FIFTEEN UNDERGRADUATES 
APPOINTED TO CAMP 

Twenty-four Alternates to Fill Va- 
cancies. Alumni to be 
Notified. 



Wailing and wondeiing ended at the 
drill period «• Tuesday when a list ol 
ibe undergraduates who v. etc appointed 
to the third officers training camp was 

read. There were fifteen men in the 

e.dlege who weie appointed : the remain- 
ing vacancies are to be tilled by alumni. 
The alternates will take the place of any 
Of the principal* who cannot go or wbo 
may be rejected for some reason or 

other. 

A list of the alumni who were ap- 
pointed is not available as yet as many 
have yet to be heard from who did not 
lake the physical examination at Am- 
herst. It is to be publised by the mili- 
tary department as early as possible 
and the lOeceswfnl candidates will be 

notified. 

The men who made the camp are to 
proceed to Vaphauk, L. L.on Jan. 5, 
1918, and will remain in training until 
April 6, 1B18. Vt the opening ... -amp 
the candidates will be required to enlist 
lur the duration of the war. During 
training period they will be enlisted as 
first class privates, ami at the end ol 
camp will be commissioned as officers, 
given non-commissioned Officers p 
tiuiis or turned over to the army as lirst 
class privates. The following i- a list 
of the undergraduates who weie 
selected : 

I'KIM ll'AI.S. 

W. 1. Goodwin, iTo. N. EdesTT*. »< 

Kosequist.S. M. It chardson, W S. Ssw- 
yer, P. J. Hunnewell. T. U. Beunian. 
It. It. I'hipps. T. K. f'arter. (J. K. Bab- 
bitt, K. J. Mansell. d W, Ib.we, I>. I 
Newbold, K. VV. Ib.yntoii, Warren Hath- 
away. 

AI.TKHSATKS. 

K. H. Skinner, K. P. Cande, U. G. 



COUNTY AGENT WEEK 

The week beginning Dec. 17 is 
"county agent week" at the Massachu- 
aetts Agricultural College. Memben 

of the league field .t.fl are planning to Davidson, G. U. teMlk, W, For- 
—— — i^ake in as many sessions as possible, bush. W. L. liosebrooks. II. It. Day D. 

SOCIAL UNION ENTERTAINMENT Countv agents and agricultural school W. Al^a, J. W. T .^»» H^, R ■* 

,„a.rncl«» f~« e.ery section of the.ter, W. B. L..nnj. t. K^ar e, . . I. 

s ,ate will join in discussing mutual ; Thompson, K. L. Boyd. It. H. I at, I. I. 

r d lems and e.perlences. Outline, of W. l^tham M. W. MscNamara s W, 

the work for the past M well a. the Hall. E. A. Larraby, H. A. K._*tr«m, li. 



Dr. ('. D. Williamson, the exhibitor of 
the Williamson Educatloaal Photo- 
logues will lecture at the next Sm-ial 
Cnion entertainment Saturday, Dec. 16, 
at 7 i'. M. with an illustrated photologue 
on "The Grand Canyon and Indians of 
the Painted Desert." The slides hive 
been gathered by tbe Santa Ke railroad 
company and are said, by all wbo have 
seen them, to be the most beautiful ami 
interesting collection of scenes of that 
picturesque region of the Grand Canyon. 
that have ever been shown. Dr. Wil- 
liamson knows the country as only a 
man who has spent a large part of his 
life there might know it and will surely 
make tbe lecture extremely inter- 
eating and entertaining. 

'Ifl.— Courckne is a sergeant is Co. A. 
504th Engineers. 



Mating year will be presented at round 
table discussions. Many prominent 
speakers are on the program. Tbe ides 
running through the whole conference 
will be the adapting of county league 
and farm bureau work to war conditions. 

RIFLB CLUB 

The freshman candidates for the rifle 

team have been practicing prone and off 

band target shooting the last week 

under the coaching of Captain Canlett, 

Taylor. Sweeney and Phillips of tbe rifle 

I team. Each man la allowed ten shots a 

iday. The men are showing up better 

I than at first and it is hoped that a good 

1 lean can be made np. 



Googlns, K. VV. Fearing. H. W. Hylami. 

KELSEY WINS PROMOTION 

Lincoln D. Kelsey T7 of Hartford, 
who baa been, since last April, a mem- 
berof the Hampden County Improve- 
ment league as one of the war emerg- 
ency workers, has been chosen by the 
eieculive committee of the league to 
succeed A. B. Jenks Ti as horticultural 
advisor, Kelsey bas been working in 
the horticultural department of the 
League all lutumer on war garden su- 
pervUion and orchard direction and 
was especially recommended for the po- 
sition wbiok Will go into effect Jan. 1. 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



7 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly^ letters 01 ext(actB 
from letters from the Agigle "i 1 ' 11 at 'the 
front.] 

American Expeditionary Forces, 
PariB, France, Nov, 19, 1917, 

Well, old boy, how are .things with 
you back at the old college. Maybe I 
don't wish I was with you, you lucky 
dog. You all ought to thank your 
lucky stars you're not where I am. I 
received a couple of letters, today, tell- 
ing me all about the informal. It sure 
sounded good, but I don't like to hear 
such things going on when I'm over 
here trying to stand the cold and walk- 
ing around half the time in mud and 
water up to my knees. Just try some- 
time living all night in a ditch with it 
raining, and never knowing when your 
lamp's going out, with not a chance to 
sleep, and now and then a cootie crawl- 
ing under your shirt. Then try It 
several more days and nights. This 
war isn't any short time affair, I know, 
and you'll all be over Boon. 

I didn't know till today that college 
was open; but I can see you all now sit- 
ting around the old fire and enjoying 
life. Go to it, enjoy it wLile you can. 
I did, and let them know who's boss. 
Go to it all of you and keep things 
humming. One never realizes till he's 
through how easy it was to let things 
slide by, keep working for the good of 
all and have everybody lay off any 
crabbing, you can't realize what a good 
friend is. A friend, a good friend, is a 
diamond over in this place. 

I tell you, you can't imagine what it 
Is to want for anything. I've gone fonr 
days with nothing to eat but a big loaf 
of war bread; have slept when 1 could 
and anywhere I could, one night under 
the stars when it was cold, and no 
blankets; have gone without cigarettes 
for days at a time, and all the time 
with French cigarettes that are terrible. 
This isn't all so bad, but you see how 
lucky you all are. 

Uowever, everything is certainly in- 
teresting here. I have bandied all 
sorts of firearms, from grenade* to 
imaK^JSimoBIT bBv"e "been Through gas 
— it's all fine and real Bluff— believe me 
we're living high. I've bad the pleas- 
ure of two flights in an aeroplane; 
made a trip to Marseille, Nice and 
Monte Carlo on a vacation. Of course 
I've had good times, and eveiyone in 
France is glad to do all they can for us. 
Girls, they're as thick as fleas and sky 
Is the limit; there are no morals. It's 
common to go down the main street of 
— and have ten or a dozen girls grab 
you by the ana and ask you to come 
with them. I had two beautiful little 
devils, slightly intoxicated, grab the 
back of my belt, and I couldn't reach 
them or make them let go to save my 
neck. There I was walking along with 
those two holding, laughing and having 
a great time; maybe I didn't have a 
good time. So this is the way it is. I 
wish you could be over to enjoy it all 
with me. 

Give ray best wishes to all the boys. 
I wish you all good luck, and any of 
you that can write I wish you would. 
I'll try and answer yon all. Hearing 
from the States Is certainly a great in- 
stitution. Write when yon can. Good 
luck and prosperity to you all. 

Lt. Louie W. Bom. 



surprise. I had almost given up hopes 
of word from M. A. C, as Will and 
Bake are not there, and they Beem to 
be my surviving correspondents of the 
ofd'gaug. 

Harold Jones) has not written for 
many a year, it seems; can he be angry 
at my travels ? 

You certainly gave me the details of 
college news. 1 wish now you would 
give me the dope on yourself and the 
last of the gang. 

Remember the time I used to use six 
sides of the paper I wrote on, and 
tucked whole paragraps between each 
two words, upside down and sidewise, 
Now the epistle lias to be just so, or it 
will be maihed or burned. 

There is no restriction on your line, 
though. Try to get Bubs, Crane, and 
the rest, Petit, etc., to write to me. 

Give all my regards, and European 
address. 

Yours truly, 

1.1." C. HlGGIXS. 



Nov. 15, 1917 



We are all well fixed although we are 
leading a lazy life just at piesent. We 
are going to the front to see some real 
work and expect to try it ourselves soon. 
Our outtit is working with the French 
Army and it is interesting getting the 
inside dope on the way the ''guerre" is 
run. 

We also have plenty of opportunity 
to see how French agriculture is run. 
We make a specialty of French barns and 
garrets when it comes to sleeping. 
Every a. m. I have the pleasure of see- 
ing a fairly good looking French peas- 
ant girl chasing cows around a dirty 
barnyard as they drink at our "wash- 
stand." 

This is a great bunch of boys. I can- 
not imagine a better gang. We manage 
to have some pretty good times in spite 
of difficulties. It promises to be more 
or less cool this winter — in fact, the 
mud freezes even now every night. It 
isn't the cold that bothers but it is a 
very damp climate. We are in a small 
French town with nothing very famous 
in it—even if I could go Into detail. 
"Al Spaulding. 



November 16, 1917. 



College Men 

are proverbially Critical Men— 
especially in the matter of Clothes 

Society IJBranfc Giotbes 

Are the Preference of Thousands 
of the Student Body of America's 
Greatest Universities and Colleges 

Jordan Marsh Company is the favorite shopping place of 
thousands of college men in New England, undergraduates 
and alumni. 

Hence 

Isn't it quite right and logical that Society Brand Clothes 
should be carried in Boston by Jordan Marsh Company 
exclusively? 

Purchases Delivered Free to Amherst 

Jordan Marsh Company 



H. L. BOPSELL, Mar- 
IC. M. Bl.'FKCM. '19 



1* 



R. 

r. 



COLLINS. 
(OLE. 'JO 



lu 



M 



A. C. 

Basement of North Dormitory 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



Sot, 19, 1917. 



Your* of Oct, 14 came 



I certainly was very clad to hear from 
yon. Our section is now fearfully busy. 
We have been at it for about two weeks 
constantly. Before that we were on 
"repose" foraeoupleof weeks, and pre- 
ceeding that we were wiih a reserve 
division which was In a quiet sector. 
But two weeks ago we were transfered 
to another division and, believe me, we 
have had some fearful nights of it. 

We are situated in a small town near 
Verdun, and although it has been neatly 
entirely blown to bits we are quite oom> 
fortable. We 20 Americans have one 
side of one* street to ourselves. Thereare 
of course no civilian inhabitants left. 
So we crawled In wherever we wished. 
In our house, number 22, there are 
six of us In the only room left in the 
house. We have a lire-place and so 
keep warm. But the rats! Jeralmy. 
it would take an entire letter to tell you 
about them. Sufficient to say it that 
nearly 1000 of them occupied our room, 
and the only way you can keep them 
from walking on your head is to keep 
your head under the blankets. 

we are nti duty from one noon until 
the next and then have 24 hours rest. 
Our main "post d'evacuatlon" is be- 
tween Verdun and the front. There are 
flue ambulances kept all the time. Thai 



Sweaters, Athletic Supplies and Drill Shoes 



JBWBLBH0 

The E. E. Millett Estate 



A full line ef College Jewelry slwsys in stock 
Broken Lenses re placed while yon wait 

Lincoln Block, Amherst, Mass. 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hoan: 9 to 12 ». m., 1-90 to 6 p. m. 



Send Flowers 

Help conserve the sugar and 

send her a box of 

flowers. 

Chrysanthemums, Roses, 
Carnations, Violets, Etc. 

Qrown on the Campos. 

Dept. ot Floriculture 

Telephone MB 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



The "Nonotuck" 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 
FIREPROOF ItJROFlAR 

HATES, $1.50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Proms— Our Specialty. 

P. J. BEHAN 



is wbere I'm writing, and it's now about 
six P. M. It is rather quiet now for 
some unknown reason and I have a little 
while to answer a few letters. 

Our quarters here are in an "Arbris." 
I should say this one is about 60 feet 
long, and 10 wide. It is made of steel 
arch, and is well banked with sand- 
bags. This is a permanent post and is 
comparatively luxurious. We have a 
table, and on one side are tbree tiers of 
stretchers where we sleep when we get 
a ehanee. 

From here calls come in by telephone. 
We have two posts that are very near I be 
lines, the nearest is less than half a 
mile of "No Man's land." We all sit 
around in this shelter waiting for calls. 
You have no idea what a strain it is 
waiting far the telephone to ring, and 
dreading it all the time. As I said be- 
fore, we are all getting rather worn, and 
all of us are so nervous that sound 
Hleep is impossible. But we've got to 
sland it a while longer and then we go 
on "repose" for a while. 

From here to our "Poste de Lecours' 
is about four miles, and it is all through 
teritory that had been fought over last 
year. It was just about a year ago this 
month that the French retook it. The 
shell holes absolutely touch one 
another. It is impossible to rind a bit of 
hind as big as your coal that hasn't had 
a Bhelling. The whole country was 
once a regular forest, but now is en- 
tirely beyond description. We have to 
pass through the places where two 
little towns used to be, but it looks 
there exactly the same aa the places 
wbere the forest was. 

Nov. 16— Well, we are through an- 
other night, for which we would be 
thankful if it was not for more to come 
We left here on our call about seven, 
and got half a mile up the road when 
we ran by one of our ambulances stuck 
Id the mud. After we tugged and 
pulled, pushed and swore, we got it out, 
and we started on. We went through 
the first little town of which I spoke 
before and from there to the next town, 
about half a mile farther, we went as 
fast as we could, as the food supply 
teams were coming out on the run, 
which means that it's time to move. 



behind us. We got one wounded. 
They all happen to be "pieds-trenches," 
a fearfully painful fungus disease 
which attacks the men's feet after they 
have stood in the water for dayB at a 
tiftjA. 

This post was built by the Servians 

and is wonderfully made, going down 

40 feet in the ground and all of cement 

construction, Bui they know exactly 

what the range is and is not a healthy 

place to linger, liy this time the firing 

bad held up a bit and back we started. 

When we got to the bridge we found 

that the whole road hsid been shot up 

since we left it. We got into oue Bbell 

hole and had quite a time getting out, 

and also nearly tipped into the ditch 

once. But after we got on the main road 

again we were safe— comparatively 

speaking. 

You have uo idea what an awful 
strain it is to drive over these roads 
with absolutely no lights except the 
gun Hashes and the blinding glare of 
the rockets and stars-shells in the lines. 
We have two posts very near the lines. 
We have all had bo many close calls, 
little things that have held ub up for 
a few seconds or sent us ahead, have 
been just enough to get us out. Sev- 
eral times shells have landed within 20 
feet of us.and it's ouly a miracleth al at 
no one has been hit. 

But we expect to leave here wilbin 
two weeks, and believe me we'll be 
glad. Although if we all gel through 
safe none of us would have missed being 
here, the most historical place of the 
whole tront. So many men have been 
killed on these ridges that it's no un- 
common sight, and in many little val- 
leys they are piled all over the ground 
as they fell, only a pile of rags and 
bones. Men one time they were. The 
French have buried by now nearly all 
Ihelrmen. But they have not buried 
the Germans, they are loo numerous. 
Wc often carry in German* who have 
been taken wounded. They receive 
exactly the same care as the French sol- 
diers and a very badly wounded German 
if he has any chance of life.be is always 
looked after, and never allowed to go 
witbour attention. 

I'm afraid that 1 have written a very 
disconnected letter but ii may give some 
idea of what our work is here. Mm 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to sec you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



r 



Scbillarc's Stufcto 

86 Aatn St., 

■Rortbampton 




JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



t irs lime iu iiiuvc. i>«t» ■*» ** «*»* «— - -• — — 

.. . .. .. ... Jahso'ntelv impo ssible to give you any 

Unless there is someluing guiug-oir, Ti»e .^^ ^ (hg b orr jfclett«M (lf ,i,e whole 



DRAPER LUNCH 



'navilaillemeot" (food supply) team* 
travel very Blowly, It's no joke, believe 
me, to have to pais a bunch of these 
nix-home team§ going absolutely at* fast 
as the poor horses can go, with the men 
standing in their Btirrup, lashing their 
horses like mad. 

Afternoon— I'm mw back at "home*' 
and will try to finish this letter. Please 
excuse its disconnectedness. We got 
by the teams, ouly being hit by one. 
and that only bent our mud guard a 
bit, and we went on. The roads are ab- 
solutely terrible, aa they are always 
being hit hy sbeils and one good shell 
will take away quite a good piece of 
road. And the way they repair them 
Is t« dump in boulders larger than a 
,.„l,lde stone. But we kept agoing in 
high as only a Ford could go, as there 
were shells going over in back of us, 
But we bad to slop. A shell- had hit a 
little bridge and completely demolished 
It There we met a big wagon to tbf 
mad, but by going out one side Into Ibf 
ditch we got by them, but It took us 20 
minute* to get over the bridge and free 
of the wagons. And then we had m go 
slow because the road was full of shell 
holeB . We gut along all right,. hough 
but just before we gut t.. our poet all 
torts of signals-red rockets in the ««• 
man lines and while In the rreneh- 
and then both sides lei loose. For- 
innately all the Bocbe shell* were 



thing, and how useless it all appears 
here. Back in America, I think the 
people will never know what the real 
condition! are. I have met quite a few 
of our American soldiers here, and they 
all have the idea that the Hoc he are 
going to best it when they see them 
coming. But of attempts they have 

made, a nits of which have not been 

published 1 .11 1 of which wc hear through 
French army channels, they have made 
some pretty punk failures so soon, In 
spite of all England, United .stales, or 
any other country can do, or have done, 
it is the French and they alone who 
have fought ami baaten (hefiermans. 
We are with ike French army al- 
though now are mustered Into the II. 
S. army and get our W8 a month, also 
the French soldiers pay of 8 ve cents a 

day. 

I),, ex CUM my mistakes but I can t 
seem to wtite slow but have to hurry on 
as fast as I can. 

our work is too inlereslltig, except 
when it gels im hot, to lei us uct home- 
sick. l<ut believe me. United States will 
look good, lint her a long letter, but it 
is quite a relief to write as it takes my 
mind off our work. I have intended to 
write to Dean Lewis, as he did me a 
favor lieforp I came over here, for which 
I was very grateful. But I haven't 
found lime, all I can do is 1o write 
when I Kcl a chance and bete is Utile 
time. When we aren't up Front, we 
have to work no our cars, ff the F»td* 
were anything but Folds, I tear there 
could be no imbalance service, 

IioOKIi F. f'l.APP, 

Cod vols Autos. S. 8, U. 18 
par B, C, M. Paris, France. 



Northampton, Mass, 



Where all foods of the best 

quality are served at the 

minimum price 



KIMR 






j) 
1/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the MasHachu- 
uetta Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MARSHALL (). LANI'HEA R ■la.Edltor-ln-Chlaf. 
WEHI.KY 8. SAWYER *I8. Managing Editor 



Absociatk Eimtohs. 

ARTHUR N. BOWKN 'IB 

ELIOT M. Bt'KKl'M "19 

AKTIII'K L. < HANDLER '19 

MYRTON t- EVANS 19 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

HI Hi. KK R. K( ihkwI 1ST '1*. Huatneaa Manager 
SAMUEL H. KKUIUSS Ms). AMisUnt Manager 
(>. M. < \ Mi'HKl.l.'.'ii. AdvertltingManager 
.IAMKS C, M.M'LKrt *20. circulation 

«}. ALKRICU SMITH 'WO. Circulation 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In cane of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered a» second-class 
Pott Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Dec. 11. No. 9 



CAMPUS NOTES 

N T o Sunday chapel exercises are to be 
held on Sunday, Doc. 16. 

On account of (he finals scheduled 
for Wednesday (here will be do assem- 
bly on Dec.'li. 

Lieut, and Mrs. Harlan Wortbley 
spent the past week-end on the campus 
eojoying the informal and the senior 
show. 

Frank J. Sinks ex-'iS has been trans- 
ferred from (amp Devens to Washing- 
ton, D. ('., where he is receiving elerfc 
in the base hospital corps. 

"Bill" Foley, who broke his ankle in 
the Senior-Faculty game is gaining pro- 
ficiency in the use of crutches. "Bill" 
will soon be able to get on bis feet 
again. 

At a recent meeting of the Inter-Col- 
legiate Athletic Board, Peck ham and 
Dagget, both of 1930. were elected as 
Mgeft of track for the 
coming feason. 

Prof. W. D. Clark of the forestry de- 
partment, who baa been in Boston for 
several weeks with the Xew England 
fuel administration, has returned for a 
short time to Amherst before returning 
to Bun ton. 

Llewelyn h. Derby, assistant in the 
department of physical education en 
lleted last week in the supply depart- 
ment of the hospital corps and has 
reported at Sew York for probable 
immediate active duty. 

KecetUt, the first Sqnlb number this 
year, will be out next Wednesday. 
Shortage of paper supply is tbe editor's 
statement for it's not being out this 
week aa prevkiasiy announced. A big 
money's worth number Is premised. 

li, T. V. held a reception for their 
men in service who were back over the 
week-end. Those bark were Lieuteti- 
anissaville 17, Wright ex-'iO, Spaald- 
in« ei-'lH. Oore 13 and Bills *13, Also 
.icrome '16, Sears *16, Darling *!• and 
Stiles '17. 

ITufeaaor Sears gave id address at the 
annual meeting ol the Fomologlcal and 
Fruit (.rowing society of the Province 
ot (viiol.ee held at Madhmald College 
last week. IN RpriM on "Persoaal Ex- 
periences in Starting a Fruit Farm la 
Mamat'huselts" and 
speakers from the States 



"Heads below" is the cry of the men 
in Pomology 50. They finished the 
amputation of a very systematically 
neglected orchard on East Pleosant 
street, last week, thereby gaining much 
practical instruction in pruning and old 
orchard renovation. 

The "Fruiters" win out after all. 
According to the records of Professor 
Sear's office there are 18 juniors major- 
ing in pomology and not 15 as was 
stated in last week's Collegian. By 
this revision the "Freetraders" in Dr. 
ranee's economic courses will have to 
be satisfied with a second place. 

The marker over the grave of Capt. 
Walter M. Dickinson '77, West Point '80 
and military instructor at the college 
1HU2-1896, has been presented as a 
mural tablet of honor to Pacific Lodge 
A. F. and A. M. of Amherst. Capt. 
Dickinson was killed in action at San 
Juan Dill, while serving with the 17th 
Infantry. 

The profits of the evening's dinner 
were lost Monday when "plumber" 
Waiter Barton gracefully deposited a 
t ray f u I of cbinaward on the odd, hard 
floor. There was nothing to it but 
"save the pieces" and fill the air with 
alibis. Miraculously one plate man- 
aged to save its charmed life by sliding 
to a Becluded corner for shelter, but tbe 
rest of them "Ob my." 

On Thursday evening in the Drill hall 
was held the last Wax Tread of the 
term. Accompanied by pianists Oppe 
and Davenport, the Freshman orchestra 
did admirable work in assisting mem- 
bers of the student body and about a 
dozen co-eds in removing splinters from 
the Hi". i and replacing them by wax. 
Everyone had a good time and all admit 
this was the best Wax Tread of tbe 
season. 

Herbert O, Beadle ex-*19, Sergeant, 
Battery E 807tb Field Artillery Camp 
Dix, N. J., was around the campus 
Thanksgiving but found nobody but 
the fireman. He says that the Collk- 
oiak Is the first sews he has had from 
this college all the year, In a Philadel- 
phia paper he saw that Springfield and 
M. A, C. had played a 6 to 6 football 
game this fall. It seems that the 
greater the distance one gov from here 
the greater becomes our reputation. 
With Beadle is Donald Williams 'If,. 
Sergeant Major in the 809tb Heavy 
Artillery. 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will- will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Collkoiam, Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 



was • of two 



I 



COLONEL WILSON TO GIVE 
COURSE AT AMHERST 
Colonel Richard 8. Wilson, who is in 
charge of the military Instruction at 
this col lege, has been detailed to have 
supervision ot the military work at Am- 
herst Col lege, assisted by Major F. C, 
Damon, who will have active charge of 
the work. These sew appointments 
were caused by tbe recalling to the 
colors ot Lieut. Kinnear of the Canadian 
forces, who has been serving as in- 
structor. Amherst is now able to meet 
the requirements of the War Depart- 
ment for recognition of its military In- 
struction by the government and appli- 
cation baa been made to the Adjutant 
Ueneral's office for the establish men t 
of a unit of the K. O, T. C. 



Y. M. C. A. N0T1S 

A man to All the place left vacant by 
the resignation of Tom Cotton as secre- 
tary of the M. A. C. V\ M. C. A. has not 
yet been found. President Butterfield, 
working in conjunction with the stu- 
dent V M CJ. A, oflBcem, baa M far 
beetl unsuccessful, but several men art 
under oonsiderat ion, 




The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. P. M. is mild, fragrant slow burning, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGUE 

THAT'S WHY IT'S PERFECT 



t-o*. Can 

* m Can 

tot. Can 

!«<>/. Can 



23 Cents 
50 Cents 
*• Cent* 
$1.80 



It Is ABSOLUTELY THE 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PRODUCED 



Manufactured 1>> 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., Boston, U.S.A. 





It'i easy to picture the delight 
of young men who drop in to 
see ua. 

Everything they wear — cloth- 
ing, furnishings, hats and shoes. 

Sporting Goods in all stores. 



Roc; 



St Wartan 




ANT 



HEW V0EK CITV 



stfrttfeSt. 

rtfthAv*. 

at tut at. 



IT'S CHEAPER 

to Buy a 

01 LAVAL 



Yea get fey far the area teat actual VALVE 
for four money when yea btt » a De taval— 

IIMMSI. It Will ulw job n,ii< t, Letter and 

lunger SRKVICK than anr other separator 

The greater durability nf the lie Lata), It* 
cleanet ■htwnlne. eaaler running, greater 
rauaett r and km eoat far repatra, make the 
price of the "cheap- 
en " machine on the 
market in reality moat 
Exorbit ant compared 
wttb that of the Da 
I .aval. 

Not tbe Hint i out of 
a separator, but the 
amount and quality of 
tbe aer vlee It will give 
yixi. should 
roar cbotc*. 



TNE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




lift HttOAItW A V 

NEW YOKE 



IE, MADfaoaSr, 

« HI" \>.'< 



Northa mpton Players 

"I COUNTRY MOUSE" 



This Week 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



SERVICE INFORMAL 

War time atmosphere pervaded the 
the third and iiiokI ■uceassftll Informal 
of the fear, rniforms ot the army and 
iiavv wt'i'e in evidence with the return 
nf many Annie men in the service ami 

tbeee together with attractive decora- 
tions of college and fraternity banners 

made a very pretty seitiiijt for perhaps 
the last eolletje danee many of the men 
will have an opportunity to enjoy. 

The attempt of Jupiter Piuvius to 
make the weather disagreeable with i 
cold soow-etorai did not in the least *•« •*►* 
the enthusiasm of the hki couples who 

forgot the worries ol war and examina- 
tions lor a lew hours. The music was 

furnished liy Catchall's banjo orchestra 
of spriiioiield and was of tbe highest 
caliber. The ehaperuaee, were from 

Smith, Mi's. Olmsted, Mrs. Miller ami 
Mis. Lander, from Mt. Holyoke, Miss 
(iil.soti and from M. A. C. Mrs. lltcka, 
The following men in th# service were 
noie.l: TuthiiriT. Klliott - 17, Walker 
'Pi, Darling "In. Sa\ille *17. Wortbley 
l*. Spauldlng e\-'is, Wright ex-"2U. 
Irving 'IT. Hrowu '14, Palmer 'in. Graf 
e\-"l*, L'lapp e\-'lT. Moynihan ex -'l!\ 
Maginnis e\-'l*. Tliayer'17 «..oe '13. 



! 



THE AIM 



A Pair ol Cloves, a Necktie and Collar 
were left ai Ginsberg's Shoe Repairing 

Store. Owner may call and secure them. 



S. S. HYDE 

Jeweler itiwl tiptloUui 

is pleasant strict 

Oi'iiitsts* prearrtpttani rilled. Krokes Lensea 

Aicuniicb Replaced. Pine Watch Keuatr- 

Ing Prompt is and swiiiuiiv Ikine. 

Hatlafaetlnn liuiinuiteeil. 



Drop in at 

"YE AGGIE INN" 



NEW CLASS ROOMS SCHEDULED 

In older to give the best of facilities 
to the count) ageul meetings, to he 
held next week, classes scheduled to 
meet iii certain rooms ol .Stuck In id»e 
have heen changed for the liisi week of 
the winter term. These changes are: 
- II. llti to Microbiology U; 8, 11. ill 
10 French Hall U .; S, II. 113 to Flint 
Lab. K. 



After twenty-live years (lose business association with the best dffkacd 
men in your college : 

To keep out lines of young men's togs so Utter!) smait and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that il will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart ll trench '* overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, I est << at ■ .,«'. 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



Meals, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



To.— Kelley has hern visiting in Ani- 
bewt, He hau been honorably dis- 
charged from the army. 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 



Run for Agrgie Men 

By Aggie Men 



H. E. SPAULDING '19, Manager 



30 c AN HOUR 

is what laborers are being pititl to- 
day. And i! this were an ailver- 
ment asking tor student? at thim 
cents an h«»ur, the chances are 
good that you would read tJiM ;ul- 
v.rtUement all the way through, 

Although all our iidveiUHers 
have not as fpectacular looking 
advertisements as this, yet ihey 
have something equally important 
to bring to your attention. They 
have something to ofTer to ymt, 
and they expect jour patronage. 

Read all these advertisementf 
and do what you as an advertiser 
would want you to do. Fatroniie 
our advertiseri. 



Campion's lil<»ck, 



Amherst 



SEE CAMPION FIRST 



" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our >i«tall\ -Ami ..thfi p>il thiiig* to eat 

MRS. L. M. STI BBINS, 

Middlr Street, Madley. Mass. 

Tel. 41S-W 

The Highland Hotel 

t nraer ef MIMawa ;out Itarnet sirffts. three ' 

Mori* ri. .in thi- t m, .11 it.-iH.t. imt iihmi..iii km j Note Books Fountain Peas 

t.-iij iniM.i' tb« Knropeen t%e. n hje«i :i»t«p | 

ri ..in Main sneet.iwar from th* neiw Hniiihi»t. Airenu fur Uv% T»i»wrltfr 

and >.'i in Umi < e«t»t »l lb* baatoMl <li~t 1 1<» . 

It« t<>. .1 1 - hi- well l iii tit«ln-.t out i urn fm tattle. 
Iiisitiis a ii-if|iimni' and imt and roM ratidtng 
«;iii't In r\ en rootu. I'rt.'en $1 ;onl up rixtiti* 

with ii.Hii tatairie $i.sa tai "i». 

ItUfM.lItlit i iiUilii- mill will »eiitilntei1 «IH). 

Inn n i in;il.'» a iin-;il i i»lpaMinl »«" > 

e\cuhiiit;..ii ih«' hij:tn-»t i|n.iin > , well roitkad 

nml <ei\e.l ill thfl.e-1 fOMitile 11..1111111 

*ti,\ lit the llluhlntiit Hotel on. r .m.l ftrt will 
.iiith il-ite «t»>lnB tliete «i|.illi %tu»ii eMl» 
r\ etillitf . 

D. H. Sievers, 

Hirhland Motel. Sprin«fleld. Ma.. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AN 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

\i' \i t<i ' ;i in |'ion"H 

JONN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 




RAHARS INN 

Nnrthanipion. M»aMehna*tia 

M'ROPLAN PUJI 



WOODWARD'S 




F. M. CUKKAN C. F. DYER 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUtiS AND CARPETS 
— *. U. MA RHM KBTATK- 

H««H,i»if iaaf 
StKI'IIK.N I.AM. 1 < >I.<JK K. !■«. 

MANrr.i'll lll»(l JKWKI.KHM 

tan lil«».M»\V \ Y, NKW VllKK 



ChUH AI Nil CSILLRUK 

I'lNH AMU KIM.s 4ft 

(iin.n. Nii.fim «Ntt nminia mroai.h 

DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

<>Mt«-M»f>«»tll 



LUNCH 



%1 Main Stroit, Masonic Building, 
N'nrtli.iiniiton, Mas^ 



Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



ClOSCd fltt/v firm I 



■I !/. to 4 A, M, 



The Holyoke Valve I Hydrant Co. 

.I..|iliem of Wrottifht Iron «tnl lino* I'li.e. 
%«l»e« mid Mttlnir* f«>i !»ie;trn, V* uter mn4 
fiaa, \ «t.. .to. ,r,| ^»ttie»i;i hoin t :»ti»l I'll* 
i ..-. eiiri|.,, ni.»- 1 Ht imaketi ti Mill »itt.t.Hea 
l.tiK hi.-ei* ii nd ( nntrartitr* f«t MMIM ntid 
Mot Wafer lle»tlnit. Aiilotimtie Hnrlnkler 
!*jnleifi«. ISoiler HN Ktiulrte Tonnei-Homi. 

Molvnke, Mac*. 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Q^iet and Com f»>rtable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

Saropaaa I'lan 



North 



7« Main 8t, 
. • i . . i . i • . . . . 



Johnson Book Go. 

Agricultural Books 
•> Filing Cases -;- 



BABBITT ' 1 H. Maiumcr 
Alpha Sigma I'hi House 



ting- Paper 

With Class Nimerals and College Seals 

All kiriiN.-f 

Loose-leaf BooKs and Fountain 

Pens, Banners and 

HllHMll 



A. J. HASTINGS 

N«w»deal«r and Stationer 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



1/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



HECKMAX'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** HAMF 



Cottage Cheese 

is richer in protein than most meats 

and is ven much cheaper. 
Try a package and be convinced. 

Also try our fancy cheese: 



OWN HALL 



Wednesday, 
12 



Saturday. 
Dec. IS 



Thursday and 
Friday, 

Dec. 13 
and 14 



Monday and 
Tuesday, 

Dec. 17 

and 18 



Nme. Petrova in "The Wait 
ins Soul" 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Drew 
in Comedy 

Pearl White in "The Fatal 
Ring" 

Robert Edeion in"The Cave 

Han" 
Comedy-Drama 

"The FighitnB Trail " 
Pathe News Big V Comedy 



GEFALDINE FARRAR 
"The WomanGod Forgot** 

<; lwrta. 

The rast Ineladea t *«*• faun, us 

Rwiu ilnmer, Theodore 
Kosloff. unit other tficat stars 
Prices Matinee, tOc unit 15c, 

which Includes war tint, 
RvenilHt l-'lonr 20c, Halemij, 
25c. Irate mclmles w.u tax. 

EMILY STEVENS 

"THE SLACKER" 

7 siiiiiwtiinL' ;ul». 

A mighty drama of the day 

and hoar. 

USUAL PRICES 



Neufchatel 
Olive 



Pimento 
Club 



All product* made from pasteur- 
ized milk and cream. 



Dairy Department 

Mass. Agricultural College, 

Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office II«. ins: 1-3, 7-H p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 



Tbur ;ire Seven i mi Xenoswhny you should 
buy your 



COAL 

or 

C. R ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk ilimii town mid create an appetite. 
Mere is where you titul the pi« mother make.. 

Qood Service and Reasonable Prices 



School and College Photographers . 




LOCAL 



Y; 52 Center St.. Northampton Mass. 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS A NO POULTRY DRESSERS 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

Beef , Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sail 
1, Poultry, Qame, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



Blackatone, North ami North < chmc mi reel*. 
BOSTON, .... flASS, 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



AKUPHKh 1^5 



Makers of 
The Celebrated 



E 






BOLTS and 
NUTS 



(arpftvUr fit -Morehousf 

PRINTERS, 



FURTHER INFORMATION 

ON THE SECOND DRAFT 

The draft situation, as far as it is con- 
cerned with the registered men of this 
college, is no nearer solution than a 
week ago, llean Lewis in a trip to 
Springfield last weelc conferred with Mr. 
Gordon, chairman of the legal advisory 
hoard of Springfield and wan given the 
very latest information which was far 
frmn satisfactory. There was nothing 
definite at all ami the only fact that 
could he agreed upon was that local 
hoards will put the men in their class 
and if this is thought unfair appeal to 
the President is perfectly legitimate, 

In reply to a telegram sent l«y Presi- 
dent Biitteiiichl regarding the tendency 
of the undergraduates of (he college to 
enlist because of lack of some definite 
ruling regarding agricultural elasniflea- 
tion, the following telegram was re- 
ceived from Dr. llollis Godfrey of the 
Council of National Uefenceat Washing- 
ton in which all students of technical 
ability are advised not to enlist now hut 
to wail until tiny are drafted. A copy 

..1 this telegram follows: 

Washington. 1). «', 
Dee. 4. li»17. 
I'JIKS. Kesyo.n I.. I'.t I II 1:1 nit*: 

"Have just been authorized by the 
Meretary of war to request all your 
technical students that if they wail un- 
til dratted they can upon summons to 
the draii camp take wit h I hem let teis 
from you stating I heir special qualifica- 
tion*. Mich letters to he tiled with occu- 
pational census qiieslionitaite ol Wal 
department under authority of this 
authorized telegram, KecreUrj of war 
also authorizes me to say that every 
effort will he made io use each student's 
training in council too with specialized 
occupation In the army so lir as !.. 
afford ca<*h technical student ot mail 
age as great an opportunity through the 
draft SJ it 'hey wen not drafted." 

Hoi 1 is (,010m \ . (signed. 

MODERN MIRACLES 

I'.v no degree did the lecture Ism) Fri- 
day night bj Hetio 1J. Welliourn on 
"Modern Miracles*' falUhort of its* title. 

The experiments were amaaing and la* 
tensely Interesting, demonstrating many 
wonders which one might well believe 
to be imp-issilile. Til. powers of light, 
shadow, and sound were nhoWn t«* be 
well worth thought by the small gen- 
erating wheel which transferred light 
into energy ot electricity ; by theeema- 
plmre which was ..peratcd by the cast- 
ingot a shadow on its controller, and by 
the wreck'ttg ot a miniture simmIihi 
house due ti» a correct pttefa ot momd. 
The powers of l It ew three njfeneieslu 
warfare wen- illustrated by the power 
ftf light in litiiig a cannon, of shallow 
In operating tin alaitn and of sound in 
detect ing ft submarine. No doubt the 
highly explosive powder ignited by a 

I of ice will also by its intense heat 

r lay an important part in war. tine of 
the nit!«M interesting .deiHoustiatbtes wan 
thi« balttiuiug oi n two wheeled car 
on n wire cable. This monorail car i* 
tial iioimI by gjrostal whose two wheels, 
revolviim in Opposite directions, main- 
tain the equilibrium of the car on w Inch 
If Is mounted. 



MUSICAL CLUB CHANGES 

l.ipshires '1H has left college to enter 
the employ of the Howker Insecticide 
Co. as travelling salesman, through 
Maryland. Virginia, West Vilginia, and 
North Carolina. 

M. K. Evans '19U now manager of the 
combined musical clubB. At present 
the clubs are beinij hard hit hy the 
loss of S. C. Johnson leader of the 
orchestra and the possible loss of How- 
ard Goff, the leader of the glee club. 
Luce *^n will take Johnson's (dace and 
IJ another vacancy occurs a man can 
probably be found to till it. The 
lladley concert Jan. 4th will be run off 
on schedule as y\ ill also t he concert in 
the Springfield Auditorium, Jan. 11th. 

FOUR MORE DAYS TO PAY 

Treas. Hall B. Carpenter of the Y. M. 
C. A. War Fund at M. A. C. announces 
that all pledges made by the suidenth 
must lie paid hy .Saturday. Dec. 15, at 
the last notice. The payment of these 
pledges is absolutely essential for the 
Y. M. C. A. movement. Treas. E. S, 
IMirancrof the National Committee of 
the V. M. c. A. emphasises the neces- 
sity of each local organization paying 
its share so that the plans for the 
winter work can he made up as soon as 
possible. If yon have pledged, get be- 
hind the Y. M. c. A. and pay your 
share before t he 15th. 

Already $2500 has been turned into 
the treasurer, which means that o?er 
00 per cent of the students have paid, 
those i hat have not as yet paid up 
should avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to call at the Y. M. G, A. office 
between 13-80 and 1-80 or from 0-00 to 
7-tHi. If not convenient to call, be sure 
to give it to the man who collected your 
pledge card, before .Saturday noon. 



pffi t. Cook Place, 



bup yo 

Asa White 

USflnlTa 



" r M 



Amherst Mi« 



Book now 

Art Chandler 
liftoarh 



LIBRARY EXTENSION REPORT 

The col leaf library has recently made 
a report in which was shown its act iv it y 

in co-operating with libraries «»f the 

»tnte for the benefit of those imeiesied 
In agriculture and related snbjt 
During the year ending June 90,1917, 
66 village libraries throughout the 
stale were loaned a total of 897 books 
ami 143 pamphlets. 



CHEMISTRY CLUB MEETING 

Ho- first meeting of the M. A. C. 

« lomistry club for the college year was 
held Wednesday in the Chemical Lab- 
oratory library, The following officers 
were elected: President, Howard Gofi 
*li»; vice-president, Robert Cbisbolm 
'10; secretary, Mather *19; program 
committee. Sweeney '19 chairman, Clark 
*1N, and Johnson 18, The nest meet- 
ing will lie held the tirst Wednesday 
attet (he Christmas vacation. 

LUMBER OAMP PROJECT 
There i« to he a lumber camp estab- 
lished on Mount Toby during the Christ- 
mas vacation providing there are 
enough men interested. All those who 
wish to enlist in the course should hand 
in their names to Prof. Wa ugh, some- 
time this week. There is a great scar- 
city of woode hoppers owing to war con- 
ditions, and here is acbance to get some 
good exercise and to help solve the 
fuel problem. Many of the colleges 
are organising camps and Fres, Thomas 
,.| Middlebury College has volenteered 
to lead the Middlebury choppers, |>ts 
live up to Aggie's reputation and he 
among l he foremost when it comes to 
doing things. 

POM. CLUB MEETING 

\ well attended meeting of the 
pomology club was held in Wilder Hall 
Thursday evening. Interesting and In- 
structive papers were read by Roberts 
If* on "Why the 2few England farmer 
does not take more interest In Orchard- 
ing'' and Preble '18 on "The Storage 
of Apples". The club has challenged 
the Economic* club to a game of basket- 
ball in the near tut tire, 



Dr. Burton N, Gales baa been reap- 
pointed as state inspector of apiaries. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's a 
"dead one," 




Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 



that have pep. 



MERRITT CLARK & CO., i&rf^iSr 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Bearh. Lincoln and Kingston Sts . 
BOSTON, fiASS. 



Only two blocks from Kouth Terminal St4i 
tton. and easily reached from gotta Station 
by Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail •hoim and business SSBtrc 
also to the theaties and places ef Interest, 

European Plan $1.00 per Da, 
and Upwards 

Table and iervlee unsurpas»ed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



NEW REGISTRATION RULES 

In order to do away with a large par; 
of the usual delay in registration ill the 
beginning Of each term the Dean's 
olliee has drawn up rules of procedure 
for registering for the winter term. 

1. At 8 A. M, Wednesday, December 

12th, the Registrar will begin to Issue 

the regular registration cards 'to the 

upper-classmen who will be requested 

to take them at once to their major 
ad v isors. 

2. The major advisor will personally 
write down the courses he wishes the 
.student to take and sign it. 

3. He will direct each student to 
take the card to the Dean's office, At 
ter it has received the signature of the 
Dean it will he ready for tb-' signatures 
of the Instructors of the courses, 

4 As soon as possible after the card 
bas been signed by all the instructors, 
it will be taken i.» the treasurer's otriee 
foi the signature of the treasurer. 

5. It is hoped that each student 
will present his card to the treasurer 
before to- leaves f,,r the Christmas vaca- 
tion. If this is not possible, be must 
present it to the treasurer before four 
o'clock Wednesday . Jan. 1i. 

6. All cards must be deposited with 
he treasurer. 

The same procciuio as above will be 
followed by the lower classes except 
that they are not required to consult 
the major adviser. 



THLS IS JUST THE WEATHER FOR A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Ours are going fast but we still have some good ones. 

$6.50 to $24.00 

We have just received a new line of 

Reversible Custom Made Shirts 

that are worth the once over. 

Prices - $1.50 to $5.00 

New Neckwear 50c to $1 .50 Flannel Shirts all prices Freshman Toques 75c 

Suits and Overcoats from $12 to $25 






COLONIAL INN 

The Place For Good 
Feeds 

Give us a trial and you will be 
satisfied. 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Maan. 

Where the Beet 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are nbown. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexail Store 



NEW YORK M. A. 0. CLUB 
The 31st reunion and banquet of the 
M. A. < . club of New York was held at 
the Hotel Manslield New York city on 
the evening of Friday Dee. 7, with 
about a.', alumni present from New York 
and vicinity. Dean Lewis and Ralph 
U ittS were Die principal speakers. 
Tbe Dean spoke on Die mobilization of 
tbe students and gave a ucticral review 
,,t the year. Mr. Watts spoke mi (he 
contribution the college was making In 
war service, the special wort ot Presi- 
dent But ter Held, the response of the 

students last spring in relieving the 

I labor shortage tu connection with 

Um Mas.a.liuseits commitlee of public 

s, the military enlistments ot the 

lludeiiU ami alumni, and the recent 

tremendous sneeeaaoi the Y. M.«-'. A. 
contribution drive. 

The other speaker of the evening was 
(apt. David Fallon of t he A ustralian 
oversea" troops who told of fotne of Ids 
war expcricmcs. He has hen through 
the most varied ot thrills h.u -n- served 
in the cavalry, inlaiitty, aviation and 
has driven a "tank". He wa« wounded 
at the battle oi i be Sotnme and at pf - 
lent is eon vales, i tig 1 si this country. 
Walter I. Morse UT, presided at the 
meeting. _^_^_^ tmammm ^_^__^ 

DORAN IN NEW WORK 

William L. D»r»n *1*», wltoBiiB been at 
New Hampshire State college m assist. 
ant in botany for the past year, is DOW 
• late eMen-ioii homo-tor in l>ofKiy» 
employed by the F. ■ D. v. In the 
Hur.au ol Flan! Industry, ID work- in 
,,„„„, -lion with the county agents ami 
Farm Bureau worker- agisting especi- 
ally hi Die proideiii* of disease control 
of market garden crop*. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schafiner & Marx Ctothes 



1 




DAVENPORT 



I 



The unsurpassed eating house for -Aggie" men and their 
TRANSIENT AND WEEKLY BOARDERS 



I 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



Cigars 



Candy 



suffeled 



Amherst, 



The western college* have 
more than fhos,. ,d the Fast, II..- CUM 
of Michigan bfinu typical -d these in- 
Mil inborn. At t tie university more than 
t.aii of the chapter bouae* haw* elo*ed 
their floors tor the Tsar and it in e»- 
jetted that many Bow will follow suit 
before next spring. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 «• ■«ia«i r«n.#n' Siaa4art far Sl.ty tt.r. 1917 

Ask For Our Crop Bosks. We Want Reliable Agents ii Unoccupied Territory 



o 



x. i. if.--- Ayono.v MnnnB«r 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 

Huh«ldl*rr »f th» Amertran Airicnimml Chemical < «. 

51 GfiAMBERS STREET - - - MEW YORK CITY 




— 






1/ 



I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 1917. 



WITH THE FACULTY 

Dr. H. T. Fernald. a bo fur scars has 
bi'cii siaic nursery Inspector, lias re- 
signed. Harold Allien ' 1 ',. deputy la- 

■pector, lias been appointed la the posi- 
tion. 

Prof. Frank A. Wftugh was the author 

of "ii article in last week's issue of the 
Country Uentleman on ''Beginning a 
Bonn Orchard" in which he shows how 
excellent results mas be obtained from 
a well planted orchard of limited area. 
JohnT. Wheeler, assistant professor in 
the horticultural department, will leave 
the 15th of this month to accept a posi- 
tion in the University of Georgia, 
Athens, (ia. 

Ex-Prof, L, It. Merrick, now head of 
the romance and language department 
at Uamlin University, St. Paul, Wis,, 
was recently presented with a gold 
medal by the trustees of the institution 
in appreciation of his aerviees as college 
adjutant in mobilizing the college for 
war service. lie has completed an im- 
portant research work dentins with 
French linguistic* and a detailed his- 
torical and critical study of the French 
and Spanish authors of the last thoiis- 
aud years. 

Dr. A. E. Cance and Prof. W, A. 
Damon were present last week at a 
meeting of the executive committee of 
the iield department of ^he Eastern 
Slates position at which plans for a 
farmer's exchange were discussed, 

A report by Prof. J. C. Qrahsm on 
backyard vegetable growing was a feat- 
ure of M. 4.0. titgbt at the Amherst 
grange last Friday evening, lie gave 
an account of making a profit of «127 on 
a backyard area or less (bau ten-thous- 
and square feet. 



JAMES W. BRINE CO. 



Established over 40 years. 



286 Devonshire St. 



Boston 



Athletic and Sporting* Goods 



Official Outfitters for M. A. C. 



Tennis Supplies 



Bathing Suits 



Camping Outfits 



Military Uniforms and Supplies 




Football 



Basketball 



Hockey 



Track 



Soccer 



Baw Baw Coats, $12.00 up 



SIGNAL CORPS CLUB 

If there are enough men interested, 
I'rolessor Bobble* intends to form aelub 
In instruction in telegraph and signal- 
ing, This club would give an excellent 
chance to men interested in aviation to 
study up in MHUe of the rudiments and 
it Is an upportutiii> that ought to be 
taken by nil intending to become st- 
tached to the signal corps some lime in 
the (uture 

ALUMNI NOTES 

m— William B. Cole has joined the 
staff of Easea County Aggie as bead 
of the r>epartmen! of Farm Mechanic*. 

15.— Gerald E. Perry baa become ' 
established at Batu (arcs, federated | 
.Slates of Malay, as a rubber chemist In 
the largest concern there. With him 
is Vincent MauebelH '16, who b« tieen 
there for ttn jean, 

'15.— Alpha Flehnt was married Dec. 
fttb to Mi,, Mary J, Honneyof Amherst, 

Since graduation Flebul ha* l.eeti em. 

ployed 1b the Bureau of KatoaMdog) 

under the department of agriculture at 
Washington, D. 0, 

'}&.— Cheater .Hpoifrird has been around 

the campus for a few days. He Is bow 
with the Lane Construction Company, 

'M. — **I*e*"* Fielding la BOW fa lamp 
iJcvens with ihe latpst draft contingent 
from Maiden, 

X*.*iO,— S. A. Phillip* »« nhout the 
rampim Sunday. 1 1 »• li | U class 
pharmacist'** mate, m hoard the r, .*». 
iianle»hip*i»uth*l)iifcui!i, wHeh ••pftmtes 
from a base in si nt iiern water*. 



Brine's Sweaters Are Superior 



Campus Agent, E. J. MAN SELL '19, Phi Sigma Kappa House. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Associate Alumni, < \ Peters, Secretary— 45 1 \V 

Joint Committee on Interest, Athletics. H, M. (Jure, Secretary— 403 -M 



M. A. C Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athletic Association. 

The College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

liasketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Interclass Athletic Committee. 



C. S. Hicks, Treasurer -403-M 

H K Robbins, Manager - res. hi W 

II I.. Russell. President— 416 

C. ft Matloan, Manager— 8338 \V 

\\ . S Sawyer. Manager— 343 

J A. Chapman, Manager 8314 

III. Citiletf. President— 8338 W 

M, F Kvans, M mager— -8347 

K, M lluttum. Manager— 8338- \V 

R, l„ Boyd, Ptistclt nl— 416 

H. L. Russell, President— 1 19 R 

() (I, Pratt, Secretary— 8374 



Amherst Co- op, 




A general confe rence of the different 

colleges mill , .< . , ,,i ttie country 

to agree upon .1 Ballot ftl ->. item ot cieiht 
for warspfTlcB lBsugge?tipd l»y President 
Fannee of Brown university. 




High-Gr.de College Work 

shirts. I'l-I'u 

lolbir,, - . S 1-lC 

(nil«, 2 l-2c 

IMnin Wa*h. , perdrm.dfe 

Harm*, rough dry, per dux. 



Cleaning and 

Steam Press in g die, I suits for $1.09 
Dr> f leaning ami Pressing, 91*50 a sun 



All hilla pBjuble ml f nlle(i» Htnrf ami pare*}* 
left Itwre will rt*reii«« prm&|vt ntte tit inn. 



G, K, HAi:i:iTT*i7 t Alpha Sigma Phi Houm ; F. E. CdlkJ k, * 2 o, College Store 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amhersd, Masjs. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

Wi carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN HEPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



M. A. C. for Holyoke 7-20 ard heariy 
untd ii-jo P. M. 

M. A C Inr Amhrrst 6-10, 6-45, 7-jo, 7-50. 
8-©5, 8 JO, HM to nrn, amt 35 nun, 
after the hour until 10 10 P. w Other 
car* Mt 1 1-50 a. ¥., 3 30, 5 §o. 7-50, 9 50. 
10-jo P, M,, *nd a L*t c«ti at 1 1-20 P, M 

Amlin^t (or M. A. C. 6ej, 630, thrn 

Hi t hctirly until So© A. M, 815,9-15, 
then 15 mm and 30 mm alter the hour 
untd 11-30 p. h other rata it is-eo 
norm and 4 00,6-00,800,1000 P. H, and 
a laat car at 12 30 p. M. 

•paclaf Cam at Bf i owa b lt BaMt* 



APHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 
m 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the HatAclds, past the foot 
of Sugar Loti Mt„ alongside the 
famous Woody Brook hattre p-ound 
to Old Meerlield, thence to Green* 
field. Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage notfern 
liquipment Train Dispatch- 
Injc 5y stern Freight and » x- 
5ervlce over entire line. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Pnmninu 




r^c 




AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 18, 1917. 



No. 10 



TWENTY FIVE CANDIDATES s ™day chapel speakers 
REPORT FOR BASKETBALL 



ANNOUNCED FOR THE YEAR 



Freshmen Eligible for the Team. Mc- 
Carthy '19 Elected Tempo- 
rary Captain. 

About SI candidates reported to Coach 

l>nl«' of tin* basketball !<';•>••* Slondaj 
.iitciiiniHi tor tin* lii'Nt practtM ol the 

year. Peaetlse ahota eoaspehred theal 

ur work, anil M -unlay evening 

another session was heW dnrina which 

Miint' tciitn Wiitk ;i;iil ;r t*"W lot mat i-ms 

were worked up, (Toach Dolt* Uelieve* 
Ajjyie will have as u<h»'1 » team as any 
Bailees ami batter than most, dea pile 
tin- fiM-t lloil only one vaisity man i>> 
left iiotti laal Mar. 

Pro i Hi-kH ha- an noti need that the 
role ilt-iiaiiitm Kreebtaea ftoni vaaitj 
leanix has beafl waivcii aside (or the <iu- 

r»iioii ol i In- « ;it . and das ur»i*ii Kri-sli- 
men to try out tot ' in- dam. 

MH'arthv *1'.<, letter man on la«tycar*» 
team, lias Im-i-ii madi eaptain. Two 
hours of practise will i»«- in*iil every 

oiuht t his wi'i-k 

There will be no tratniim tabts tbUt 

,. ir tint «'ach tiuio will In- L'iv»-n UM 
prolilroi of ailjiiHiioi: hi* own training. 
Tin- ili*|tli*t'ii.n of Hie Ht- .inr and 
JunluT iTiflllll has thrown the t»*«lk of 
mumiinffuul tin* taaai ii|m»h the lower 



ProfeBaor Fitch of Amherst Sched- 
uled for M*rch 10. Rabbi Mann 
to Speak January 6. 



MR. JOHN KENDRICK BANGS, 
HUMORIST, TO TALK JAN. 5 

Third Social Union Speaker. Told ol 

"Salubrities I Have Met" 

Laat Year. 



Among those presenting ibenwel 
mandates ar.- huh, I'npi'* •'»*'*- 
I , !';iikhtiis!, \\ I) llama, \Vhu>, 

enrb, lilanehard ami Vteket*! iwu. 

-hards, fstedwan, Ball, I*nt. 1>»- 
)., Uarrington ami Wright; IfBl, 
,.n. look, Kro«*k, Whiith- ami 



■ ^^ 



^ JlLLEGE I 



11 



J turinu the i 

J^l. ha*. ...i 
rM lii r nt m 
h;i 



ROLL AUGMENTED 

w liny* a number oi 



The sumlav Chape] speakers tor the 
list oi the year have been BBOooaeed. 
Several prominent men, among whom 
are Uean Charlmi K. Brows i»l dew 
Haven, Conn, and linn-** Qnrtoa, editor 

ol the h.rn'H Wok iiiaua/inc-.havi- beefl 

obtained The Bev. Hell stcPherai I 

th.> l-'itst Corigrt-gattonal eburcb, Spring*- 
i'u'UI, is also listed, fallowing la the 
complete schedule of Sttaday speakers 
tor tin* eetlege year: 
Jan. «1, Babhi l^mis L. Mann, \>w 

Hil % l»ll , < 'otlll. 

18, Alfred K, Stearus, Andover. 

•it), \iv\, John llayiH-s llolim's, 

Church oi th»- M ess i ah , New 

\..rk. 
21. It. v Judson I., (row, Fltch- 
burg. 
Keh 8, Kev. Neil McPbera«n, Spring- 
field Kir*i Congregational 
< hiinh, 

to, i»<.ati Charles B, Brown, New 
H aven i ' oaa. 

17, Uev, ItOttgbtoS .**>.• hum hi- her. 
Kiwi Unitarian t'hurfli.lllin'- 

bam. 

March 8. Bruee Barton. Krety Wtfk, 
Sen Vork Ciiy. 

10. Prof. Albert Parker Pitch ol 
kmberst College, 

17. liev, Herl.eri V. .lump. FlfWl 
Congregattoaal ihnr.ii. Han* 
Chester, n ll. 
April 1, Bev. J. Edgar Park, Th. S. 

ood « tiur.h. West Newton. 
' 14. Be*. Anhur II Hradfofd, 
t •..ngregatioual < hureh, ltm 
latiii. 

11. Br-v, A. II. Wbeeloek I on 
grogat Ions If "hureh. Need ham. 



John Kemlriek llanu's, I he eelebnited 

American humor lal and author, will 

he the lei-tureral the next Social t'nion 

antertalument, Jao r», at 7 o'eloek Mr. | 
Bangs i« not a stranger to Aggie for he 

delivered a vers humorous ami interest- 
Ing lecture a year aijo on "felehrit ies I 
Have Met." Kuriiier editor ol nuiiiei 
.•us magaxliMM), Including ffacper'a 
iiifi///. The Metropolitan i Lift and 

/'mJS'.iiTiil author of many hooks, aunmy 

them "A Proposal Under l>iHiiu!ti. s 

and "tihoH's I Have Mel,' and also a 
|.lay wrlubi. Mr. Banus has heeoint* 

tauioiis fur his entertaining ami awiua- 

ut<! t.H iiliii-s. both to yomiK and old. 
Social I'uioii ttekeis will he required at 

the 'loois. Adtnisnioii to those aoi 

holding liekels will he &U eenls. 

COURSE IN WIRELESS TO BE 
GIVEN AFTER CHRISTMAS 



ill into some form or 

Mim . ?*MiMie 

; bars ' u *' 

i«! lollnws of 

th.mt- iilreaily j£"iie: 

Howard M «♦«>» MB, Harvard B«Hle« 

Srhool, Cambridge. 
Raymond Ir J..r«lnn 1?». wi-ond machia* 

inrii rrmte, ( ii,irl#rt«>wn navy yard. 
John N. I'n-ble Is. Ueiruit company, 

I*. >. Ambulance < or|«, Allfiiiown, 

Pa. 
WHllBtn K, I*»rlii« 'Wt WunmfUf PhH, 

P.m. Knglneers, Fori Hlocum. N i 

Wnli liini i» Jaitte* \. P.irrliiijM.ii, 

graduate stndcwt in utir(»Bo«y. 
Charlvs 11 Million W, side seainati. !'. 

- »»ff, imw studying radio at 

tiiiirlf'sin'Ai! ua*> y.n 



CHISH0LM ELECT10 CAPTAIN 

Bi.hrri < h in holm *11» of M. Ii.-e has 
Iweti ele€ -ted . a plain of varsity hockey, 
I,, n!) the Hiixm '. i aaaad m tberesigas 
il„!ini!s. m. Klehardaoa l*. who ha* 
lelf iidtege to enter the third aWcers 
traiitiug camp, Cbtsbolai and lt"s» it* 
arc the only leiier nun of the team at 
the prt-ent time. The laifpr 1* eapecl- 
Ing I eall to the avlat og aetl he shortly. 
< bisuolis made bis let let at rover last 
«e»K»n. pia.vittg ft stellar game thmagh- 
out the sebeda • 

ThrnKfh a ile. .ion of the alhlelie 
beard freshmen uj» in t heir ptitilles are 
eligible for the team. Pra. m . Will 

■Hart wgHlarii 1 niter the Christmas! 
m 



Moat in Afftties »«r prepared ness 

and s.-ni.e ha« yoiie up amil her several 

points. This ii B hi the formation of 

a eoitree in wireless iele«raph> and 

-i-iuaiiuK. I* 1 he ui*t*'« h > '* ^,,, sssbMoa. 
Kundamenlully. tt is Intended to t.einiit 
thoae men Intel sated la aviating and 
balloon algeal work.hai It sstghl just 
as well luriiish a well ynmuded basi« 

|.n any form ol radii tiimuni«at ion. 

|i.. in easily be seen that I he aia-nlsi- 

ii.. ii oi a grounding la this braweh while 

now ill iiilleue means just so mm h of 
in islvaetage when actually in serTice. 
Pi. .t. Robbtna ha« made arrati«ements 

f,.r a.i -iiniiiMidaling the men i:i thes.,ph 

..more and Nssthst lahoratolles «d tbe 

plis.i.s biiihlinif. ami U wiring Up eoii- 
nretiotiK for biiisxer pigiialini/. The 
w.»rk mil ronsist ot pra ct i ce la raeai*- 
inn. .u|iplemetited with lectorsaoa the 

principles «>f wireless eomtnunieation. 
Up to Monday *«¥eninR, 19 mm bad 
ftignad u|. h.r the eontae, wbicb will !«■ 
given, as tar as posalble, lonr nights a 
wpek. after Phristmaa. The work is 
entire!* toiSJrtgfJ and there arenodeti- 
nite reel t id Ion* other than that ot class 
room, and it Ii desired of those intpf- 
m%mi that they take .ulvintage of Ibis 
opportunity by ligalng up with Pr«d. 

l!obbln« Ht I In* ph\-H- ofh.-e. 



SCHEDULE OF MILITARY 
WORK FOR WINTER TERM 

To be Run in Conjunction with the 
Physical Education De- 
partment. 

The Ifepartmeiii ol Physical Kduea* 
lion, in eon juiu-iioii with tin* Military 
Department, has drawn up h schedule 
oi Physical Kdinatloii i-Imshcs for the 
wiuiei term. The s.hiuiile, tot'ether 
with the H, O. T. C. regnlatlooa eoneere- 
ing i be ii'Hivi-. is ,i- lollon i 

MII.ITMIV l'll\s|i M 1 lil I \IIOS 
l*l,'i M.li V Mi 

The work will he that eoiilained in 
Ike 'Manual ot PIi>m.-hI Training 

(Tatted States \ rasy." 

[he uniforms -sill Ih* white running 
shirt, while running pants, ami white 
i hi. I. ei shoes. Tins uiiiloini must be 
kept clean at ail times 

\i the close ol each period gVWf] man 
is egpeeted to take ■ shower bath and 
have complete change ol clothing. 

Every man must he to uniform and in 
his (Hisition on the tl.ioi at fifty minutes 
past tbe hour ii r,ti •-» hM ' 
s« in im ir "i ii tea as. 

liiesilay II. V» IMS, Km *hnii 
panlsn sad othecm. 

Wednes.lH*. II ■*>«> l-' ; i" 8o»h* 

p. inns. ..Itn.i^. and junioi- 
not in It. 0. 1 C. 

Wednesday '.', 10 4 '•'<» Kre»hinaii com 
panics ami ulBceft 

Thursday 11 -Wt 1MB. Sogl WW com- 
panies, attests, ami juniors 
■ot in It. t> I. 

SI'K IAI. JHI.ITAHY HHII.1.. 

Begulstkm drill uniform mast ho 
worn. 
Wednesday 4 40 ft 10. tttipbomore 

panics ami officers. 
Wediie-dHV .". W Ms>. rieshmsn 

pjMiies and officers. 



Thpre l« to he ■ »»ry Important meet. 

ina of the )'»!' '" ,llt ' Kf» l ">" ,,1 

i»gy building I I it*. lay nigh' Si 

045. li i« terj essentia! the 

„,,,,. ;,, i ,,i 1 1.. . , there. Tin- - 

secret dope and i Jj want* to get 
in an 



There are seret il la miller f a«*es amon g 

tin- Count) Went* who are on ihe 

1 ,iiiipu- tor the week. "BUI" Hanson 

*s,. R, , Mayo 1", 'P-ic Ma'iooii 

ii;, "Mac. Keiiey 'If, "dach D/.iT 
"IT. t.eorge Krlrkson i". Behwah dl. 
( arruth .17. "Peie" Mayo T". HurkeTO. 



BOOKS FOR SOLDIEBB 

AT HOKE AND OVERSEAS 
The campaign lor supplying the] 

young BSOa who have gone into war »t -i- 
viie l»as bees pushed i.ri the eampioi by j 
( liarles It i.rceu, college librarian. It i 
is |fj desire lo have any g«x»«l iMMiks | 
ami reeeaf magazines contributed and 
seni t.. ihe library, from where they 
will be sent to their pro|H»r de*tinetfoo, 
whether it be tamp lichens, direct to 
i Erancs, or alaewhere as desired. 



SOPHOMORE SMOKER 
on Wsdnsadii night, the elaas ol 1W0 
will hold g Bupliuiimffe B s s ohei laths 

.Soiial liiioii r.H.ms. Hue Ut the fact 
that they held no banuuci last year, i 
will Ire their lirsi real (eLlu-gether, 
The speaker?* of the evening are to be 
Ijettt. i .ore, who has recently relumed 
from Plattsburi; ; Krol. Robblm and Col. 
Wilson of the i*ollege; and the fatmo s 
lN*«n Burns of Amherst, Alter ihe 
spcaklna, specialties will be put on by 
various member* »f ihe Has*, and a 
general good time enjoyed, lietr#s!« 
meiits will be aarvod. Hie smoker will 
start aiT-.Wt. with I Ten. Newel! pre*, 
ing. The commit fee consists of Ifcoiabl 
II. Smith, speakers; John A.irawford, 
entertainment: and t.uy F. Maele* «i 
refreshments, 



At the annual meeting of the Mtnte 
li.. as. I of ARileiiltu'e Pn.*f. A. V.tJwmni* 
was reeleciiid Botanisi of the. board. 



19} 




V 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
frora letters from the Aggie men at the 
front.] 

France, Nov., 16, 1917. 



It seemed mighty good to bear from 
you. Write some more, as I am dying 
for college and class newB. We have 
been loafing lately, being "on repose, " 
We are now in a little village with 
nothing to see but mud. We were up 
at the front for a few weeks and our 
work was to carry the wounded from 
"posts de secours" near the front to 
hospitals a few miles away. We were 
in a comparatively quiet sector, but we 
learned a lot. We have seen all kinds 
of shells land but they have kept away 
from us so far. Remember me to all 
the fellows and if anyone has time to 
write, you might give them my address. 

Fbkd V. Wauoii. 
U.S. A. A.S.,Sec. 6gtf 
S. S. A. Sec. 57. 
American Exp., France. 



62nd Infantry, 

Phksidio, S. F. f Cax. Nov. 28, 1917. 

» 

I am finally with Uncle Sam's Army 
though it took me nearly ten months. 
And 1 like it immensely, not only the 
work, but the men, the spirit aud the 
ambitions I am with oue of the newer 
regiments which have at present about 
half the required number of meu though 
we are hoping to be tilled up so as to leave 
for active duty early next spring. To 
be sure the work U all new, especially 
that of commanding men, and while at 
times I feel very uncertain aa to my 
ability, all I need Is experience, which 
I am receiving, 

I ipent eleven weeks training at Fort 
Leaveuwonh, Kansas.— not much like 
eleven weeks in college. la those 
eleven weeks we covered aa many books 
as I did in four years at M. A. C, but 
X make no pretentions aa to having 
learned all those books contained. We 
■imply learned where to look for help 
when It became necessary. Yet I was 
amaaed at the work I was able to ac- 
complish when the occasion arose. Was 
busy from 8-30 to 9-00 six days of the 
week with study from seven to nine 
on Sunday evenings. I wouldn't have 
missed it for a good deal. 

We are located here, right on the 
Exposition Grounds, and my company 
headquarters are almost at the water's 
edge. It surely is glorious sport and I 
am mora than lucky to be stationed 
here for the winter, for it Is one of the 
prettiest spots I have ever seen. 

Am due to sit on touris-Martial now. 
Knee rely, 

Ev%nwn V, llPaow, *17. 



Camp Dews, Dec. 10, 1917. 

I've been a busy boy, with lots to do 
and r»ry little time to call my own. 
However. I'm not painting camp life 
black, for conditions are Irelter than I 
expected, but quite often I wish I wen- 
back in old Aggie. Hut I re*lir.e that 
it will be far Iretter for me to get Into 
the fray early, for it will ha harder for 
the fellows that mme later, I've go! in 
my application for the offWr*' training 
camp, and bope to be recommended by 
my captain. He's a peach id jwimi. 
I'm working hard, and believe me. 



I know a deuce of a lot more about the 
military game than 1 ever knew in col- 
lege, and have taken a lot more interest 
in it. I rather like it, too, and as long 
as they feed me well and living condi- 
tions are good, 1 won't feel bad. They 
have been pretty good so far I'll have 
to admit, and I hope it keeps up, but I 
think it's going to be colder than h— 
this winter. 

Seuo. Stark M. Kino ! 20. 



I am more than satisfied with my 
work at Fort Leavenworth. The work 
at present is bard. for after drilling four 
and one half hours each day and attend- 
ing lectures for about four hours more, 
they corapell us to study betweeu seven 
and nine p. m. 

This schedule keeps one on the con- 
stant go frora 5-45 P.M. and when the 
study period comes, between 7 aud 9, 
the body is so physically tired that it is 
hard to concentrate. 

The treatment given us is perfect. 
I'leuty of food and food that is good and 
changed every meal. 

Yesterday I received my uniform ami 
although the fit is not perfect it is all 
that one can expect. 

Today I expect to get well acquainted 
with my ritie. That means to kuow ii 
from "A" to "Z" which is some job, for 
the rifle consists of 93 parts. 

My mailing address is somewhat long 
and takes up all the room on an 
envelope. 

M.i in U<- Morse, 

Company "S" 

Provisional Officers Candidates 

Battalion, 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 



Royal Flying Corps, 
Camp Borden. 

Today has been some day for me, 
I've had more different sensations in an 
boor than I ever had before in my 
whole lifetime. 1 bad just been hang- 
ing around here the last few days 
without any flying because all the 
stick control machines in our flight are 
smashed or disabled, and I had never 
had instructions on the wheel. You 
know the Canadian "Curtis*" has the 
"Joyce" slick-control, which is just a 
wooden stick pivoted to the bottom of 
the fuselage and comlny up between 
the pilot's knees. This controls every- 
thing but the rudder. The American 
"funis*" baa a wheel control, like an 
automobile. 

Well, I got rather tired of banging 
around, so I asked for a wheel ma- 
chine. It wasn't any harder than the 
Mick except that yon have to land 
faster because of the dehedral of the 
wings, and 1 got off my Instructor'* 
test all right. Then ibis afternoon I 
went up in another wheel for my il* 
titude MM-M teet up, shut oft 
your motor and spiral down, landing 
in a fifty-yard circle. It seemed so 
good to gH Up in the air again and it 
was sucb a peach of a day that I 
thought I'd Ket off some real flying. 
So I climbed for almut an hour until 
llseemed that 1 could sec half of Can- 
ada. 1 did some "avion*" and a few 
figure eights to start her with. Then 
I fried a few vertical bank* and gut 
away with them in great shape, I 
began to think I was becoming a real 
aviator, Then all of a sudden an- 
other "alntmler" went whistling by 
sjhout lot) feet over me in Hie opposite 
direction, I knew I had apreiiy fast 
machine and I thought It would he 




Your Red Cross Needs You 

All you need— a Heart and a Dollar 

The demands of your Red Cross are constantly growing. Where 
we have been sending abroad pounds of food and hospital supplies — 
we must send tons. Where we have been sending hundreds of warm 
articles of clothing and dressings — we must now send thousands. 

We can all help. We all must help. It is not only each person's 
duty to join the Red Cross and send a membership dollar on its 
errand of mercy — it is every one's right. 

Perhaps a dollar won't seem very much to you. Most of us waste 
that much every week in careless "bookkeeping "—trifles and nick- 
nacks. Yet, a dollar invested in Red Cross membership will help 
Your RED CROSS, Your ARMY, You> NAVY, Your ALLIES. 

Who is Behind Your Red Cross ? 

Prseident Wilson heads it- 
Congress authorizes it — 
The War Department audits its accounts 
General Pershing in France approves It— 

And every one, of us — man, woman and child — must support it 
with at least our membership if the Red Cross is to lighten the hard- 
ships, guard the health and bind the wounds of our Boy* and our Allies. 

Go to your nearest Chapter, join the Red Cross today! $ioo 
Membership — It entitles you to display a Red Cross Service Flag in 
your window. 

Help your Red Cross obtain 

"TEN MILLION NEW MEMBERS BY CHRISTMAS" 

President Woodrow Wilson writes: "our consciences will not let ua 
enjoy the Christina- Reason If tbti pledge of support to our cause 
and the world's WMl ll left unfullilled. Kcd Cross membership 
is tbe Christmas spirit in terms of action." 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



H t.. KlSSEI.!.. M«r.. is 
K M. HI fH M. 'HI 



R, B. »«•!. I. INS. 1» 

r. k t oue, m 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



Sweaters, Athletic Supplicsand 



The E. £. Millett Estate 

A full line «ff rwlleae Jewelry always In Stocfc 
Broken Lenam reptaeMl while you wait 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mui, 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

I 9 to \t a. at., \-m in 5 p. m. 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH ? 

Hake it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 

Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



STUDENTS 

going home for ihr holidays 

DON'T lUktllil 

with you to mother, slater or 
sweetheart 

A Box of Those Dainty Flowers 

UrriWB «m thr I iirinni". 

Dept, ol Floriculture 

Telephone mo 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



The "Nonotuck" 

Hoi yoke's Leading Hotel 
riNEPNOOF 



RATES, SI. SO PER DAY ANI UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parti 
— froma— Our Specialty. 



,, ,o overhaul him. So will, entirely you'W boned to straiten out 
,,,,„ S1 „„, to . .».. . A) i;iU . lu , n . , UIll 

UnST.hr,: •«..!' "-blue *~i | • —N .— «»*»- "^ ^ ' 



vertically i»t" the wind, Well, the 

long and the short of it is -I went so 
far Up on my ear that my redder became 
elevator and n.y elevaior my redder. 
Of course I knew all this in theory, but 
In practice forgot It, and the result was 
that in a jiffy Iwas in thepreitiest little 
spinning nose dive you ever saw. 1 
never knew a big machine could spin 
ho fast. Well, I tried every Matted 
thing I eouhl think of <>» those con- 
trols (und 1 wan thinking fast) keeping I 
opposite rudder to my spin: but 1 might j 
as well have tried to stop her spinning 
by stiekingmy han.l out in ihe wind. 

\mi all the time her old ooM continued 

1„ point direct]} at the forest below me 
and every time she went aronn.l she 
seemed to spin faster. And just as 1 
hail begun M> wonder just how hard 
w.dhit that forest. 1 felt the old 'bw 
begin to flatten out under me and 1 
,.,,,,1,1 make out the hori/.oii rolling like 
mud -because I was di/./.y from m> 
little set*. L gue^ 1 kept her level 
more by instinct than by anything else 
until inv Bead stopped spinning', and 
y„u eau'bet 1 heaved a big nigh of relict 
when I felt her riding along as smooth 

as telvet. 

You know for a few second* 1 thought 
the old earth would get me before I got 
.lightened out, for 1 was moving 
toward it hi over 100 mile* an h «I 
with mi e.iginerunning full hlasl. Km 
N ,„, can bet the next hank I took wax 

Bearer It degree* Ibw WB degrees 1 

Then 1 had U) climb for IQ minut. 
mB ke up Ho- height l ha«i lost la •>•> 
little spin, ami by fire lime that I get 
up to my WOO I was feeling pretty «o,».l 
again. We get rat her chtllv on i B*M 

long climbs in spite ot iheefotbeew* 
wear and we've just «<»! l<» do ■ensetbllH 
to keep wound up. Tucker a pal «u 
mine from the S. of H. A. BtTeeb, 
and I had promised each other lk»l 
we'd do a stall before we eame down 
Well, Ihe spinning m«e dive took ewwl 
about all the desire for any mote stents, 
but when i was just ready la mmm 
down I screwed up my courage »ud 
pulled the rdd wheel back again-! ■] 

Hlouirt'h, 

ll a stall you go straight up until 
you are, vertical to the earih. lb... 
when you h*e nil «)*»"« *i^ et] Mf "' 
tbe maehlne begin to vibrate and frem- 
hie «hut ofl your motor .|Htck and baa 
the old wheel. For about half a S«wwi 
1 hung u P there bmw up, and then, O 
hoy! Thai t«n and * half of engine aad 
aeroplane started for Mother Earth at 
about m per. Of course Irfdnsj tail nr- 
and the elevator Hlir.1. It «toe*n - t takr 
long for that engine to sway place* with 

the tall. 

You can imagine the sensation of «? 
ing tio.e-fir.1 at that rale of *peed, 
\„d the worst ofl l was, jn»t after the 
„..,e swapped pbw with the tail, lb- 
weight of ihe eiiamr «wiiittf the p»,in. 
with ihe nose a little pa-t the »l 

Hrre's where 1 a» again I I thotiahf . 
hul 1 kept Ihe wheel up HlIBl ■«»•»»«' 
« y .lomach and after a abofl Awl 
straiBhlened cut on a re*pwtl bl « * ,H,r 

**A "«»p Is ji»t llk * " ■ ,in ' """'' 
that vim take ft little dive t.r»l I ■ 

gather speed and de «•' ~ ! ' ' ?«»< 
eigine off until pw bate gen* an in* 
way tip Slid around and are tiyuiB n P - 



was this morning, Bspertenee comes 

in bttnehes in this game. 1 expeeled 

to gel bawled i. iii properly mhw l 
came down, bat nay Hentonael seemed 
rather pleased. And DOW 1 feel like 
having a good sound sleep. 

Ivan Uoiuims. 



Come to us for 



l'. S, Engineers, France. 
Nov. 86, V.nl. 
I have jus! been shifted from my old 
camp and am now in charge nJ the 

wagoners of Ike second baUllon which 
hi located about forty mllee fcona my 
former abode. Our eld camp WH within 
easy range of Ibe enemy gum and at 

night the flashes of the fBttl and the 

glare..! I he manv HgbtS were distinct- 
ly visible. The boom of the artillery 
and machine Buns would often be 
heard. While there I saw two aero- 
plane battles and numerous barrages ..! 
aerial runs I tying to keep Fritz too blgb 
for observation purp.-s.-s or preparing 
to bring him d.-wrt. <>n the day before 
I letl lor I lie new .amp I saw several 

hundred new prisoner,-, captured to ■ 

,,.,,.„, p Us h. They Were either M -l j 
young or very old sllboagh there wa- 
ft few tine athletic type*. .Several sp.-kc 
English while some ot u*. you know 
the extent of «»y <«™»ii eoavetaed 

with them in whal We tried to make 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Scbillavc's Stubio 

$6 Aain St.. 

flortbampton 




i sin 
m get 



P. vl BEHAN 



Vll • li«'»e stunt? 

SHIfl flitWn. -VII Iliew 

d«ne at a M»*J beigbl m 

licet Willi She earll. Mft I 

of them. It'»t ih- 

danger, a* long ^ iil |,|VI ! ' ' 

helgbt.for ontose joti h*M >•"«> 



their native tongue, 

Where I was situated was farther from 
Ihe tint and Is more H at (he present 

wining. «»" account of the change I 

have been |o« a!. .1 .01 iwoo! the in..--t 
i.mou* battlefield* in ft****, Bxeepl 
l,,r one small ar-.i iher.- are no U*e», 
these iaving been cut down b| ihe 
retreating §n*nrf. M"^ of Home thai 
remained slandlng are shell riddled 
and are only Mumps in reality. The 
itebU an I mass of water lllied shell- 
lodes arid vary In si*e and .left h up to 
tl feet act.... and eight ..r H» dec; 
eordinil to the slwo! tbe shell causing 
„. » »ue could ea*ily be drowned in 
sneb, Aboet a mile from here is ihe 
bug« crater of an exploded mine in 
h a large h WW c.uld he com- 
lorial.lv ploed and be completely hid- 
,!,.„ ,. ., v , w In another pari of tha 
butt if field are the remain* of the llr-t 
ranks that '• »-.v *« 

hinu in i-o-r. ■ . ivable position and 
plan ami usually near them arc found 
the u raves ot men * !u> handled them,! 
It ba* !"**•" « ,v B* >,,, 1 b.rsiUH* !«• **9 
IM«> ot Hie new t>|n«..l tanks, •■■J»»lde 
„f making six or right miles an hour, 
and bel > re •. , . t !»*•> are «»me smiNMli 
,„, , -,- in , | . i.etntf run on the same 

lor* and are 

„„ n , | ng io them 

.ntd*the> m..w down everything itl »ifthl. 
( i,;,ve been in the lir- ''• •■ ■ •"-» 

:,ii,| have «', » wlmt - f) •!• ' ; " 

\., M.ii. . land" ftnd«v#inhe des o lat e 
land thii' lilies ihe I .V M I 

cannot Ik* n»Bj^red to M ! 
which were fomented oine were mark- 
ed htre and fbere « u, ,,..,. rett m- 
rnenti wtileb were 
I wo or iBore 
[feel in i!iiekne«». timet ■"» ■ time 1 
,,i« <,,rii.!in 1mm. l» ppiiitnimi; fr-.m 
l„,» •« ,.( the Ircin-hes of ealthw 
; ,|„- rest ot ibe in. i was oui .»f 

*iiib» I vn-li I ...ii .1 i. ll >.»ii »H hut 
■ I,.. , . ■!,... r-hip - v «'rv striel. 

If hsis been rattling and baihrig Lnlay 
, -, , . .-: ;iii.t a todj . re 



jntrnued on psse tl 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Ory and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



DRAPER LUNCH 



Norttiampl 



Where all foods of the best 

quality are served at the 

in inimum price 



KIMB, 



lip 
I 






/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MARSHALL (). LAM'HKAK'IH.Kdltor-ln-Chlef 
WESLEY §, KAWYEK Ms. MSimglng Editor 



Associate Editors. 

AltTHI'H N. HOWKN M9 

ELIOT M. ill I'KCM '19 

ARTHUR L. (HANDLER "19 

MYRTON F. EVANS 



t'.t 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

BIRGERR. KiiSK^I IST'ls, BuoineM Msnsser 
SAMUEL H. KKICKISS Mi). Assistant Manager 
(i. M. ( AMI'KELL'L'O, A <i vert liinif Manner 
JAMES ('. MAI'LES '20. Circulation 

G. ALFRED SMITH '20. Circulation 

Subscription |2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager an soon as possible. 

Entered UHcond-rlut matter at the Ambertt 
Poet Office. 



KAPPA SIGMA SERVICE FLAC 

The Kappa Sigma service flag, with 
14 stars, is the latest addition to the 
fraternity service Hags. Following is a 
list of the men who have stars on the 
flag, with the branch of the service in 
which each is enrolled: 



▼•I. XXVIII. Tuesday, Dec. 18. No. 10 



A SOLDIER'S THOUGHTS 

[The follow! nir poem written by a son 
of Prof. Prank A. tYaugfa and printed in 
the Springfield Republican of Dec. 2 is 
reprinted by request.] 

Today I am safe In the barracks. 

And the fight seems far atrsj : 
A Are burns, and It'* warm here; 

Tn« morning Is bright and iray, 
Laat night I was out in a hades 

Watching the star shells thine. 
And hearing the whine of the bullets— 

Two kilos away rrom the line*. 
Around was a horrible blackness, 

Here only mud and grime; 
The auto* all full of the wounded 

I sipped and slid through the slime. 
And each ■inglr man In those atttwi 

More of a Man than I. 
For they seemed almost happy 

Home though about to die. 
Hut, watching, my fears all left me. 

These men were all . aim « in not 1, 
J know that 1 must die sometime. 

And. if It be I die here. 
May I go to my death a-smiling 

Like a Frenchman without any fear, 
Fsivatk !l;i ..ri.i. h V. Waion 

Section SO IT. s. army ambulance ser- 
vice American expeditionary forces, 
France, Oct. 21, 1B17. 



1917 

P. R. Babcock, First Lieut, Aviation 

Corps, France, 
Mi I ford Lawrence, U. S. Navy Radio 

Service. 
.Joseph Whitney, U. 8. Navy Marine 

Corps. 
Carl Gurshlin, U. S, Navy Hospital 

Corps. , 

1918 

(apt. Roger Weeks. 15th Co., 4th Batt. 
Depot Brigade, Camp Devens. 

2nd Lieut. Charles Fraser, Co. I), ltlKth 

Kegt., 42nd Div. American Expedi-J be rsl^Mass., as soon as possible, 
tionary Forces, France. 

2nd Lieut. Max Marshall, Quarter- 
master's Corps, ('mop Devens. 

1st Lieut. Harlan Worthley, l\ s. li. 

2nd Lieut. John B. Minor, Jr., (Jo. l; 
Fort Leaveuworth, Kansas. 

1919 

Allan L. Pond, Hq. Co., 14th K. It. En- 
gineers, American Expeditionary 
Force. France. 

Kinsan lilanchard, Aviation Corps. M. 
I. T., Cambridge. 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the college 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anything else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unless de- 

I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 



layed in the mails, 
wherever I am. 
My address is 



I will- will not- send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and corxredes in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of the Collkuian, Ani- 



19S0 

Fred V. Waugh, Sect. 89, I*. S. Ambu- 
bance Service, Batt. 24 American 
Expeditionary Force, France. 

Serg. Starr M. King, 82nd (.,., Depot 
Brigade, Camp Devetis, 



DEPUTATION TRIP 

The deputation team of the Y. M.C, 
A. made a decided bit in their trip to 
Williamsburg las! .Sunday. The team, 
composed of R. T, Park hurst *1B leader, 
H. L, Boyd 1*, T. II. Hetiman '18, Q, 0. 
Roberts 18. K. A. White 19, and Lee 
Burton 19, were guests at the homes of 
the members «#f ftw- Cngregalioaal 
church at supper. A i 7-00 they attended 
the young people's meetinir. The even- 
ing service, beginning at 7-t0 was con- 
ducted entirely by the Aggie men. 
Each man in turn gave his personal 
ideas on the value of Christian life to 
the individual, Lee Burton played 
some special music on the violin with 
Boyd at the plan... The men were well 
received and there was a good sited 
audience rrom the whole town. These 
(IcpulaiiiHis are doing good work, not 
only in the towns visited but also in 
boosting the college in the rural com- 
infinities, Raymond Park hurst has 
already planned live older engairernefifs 
for deputation work in the small towns 
near Amherst. They are to come every 
other week end after the Christmas 
vacation. 



W MAY PUT DAMPER 

ON "CHOP A CORD" WEEK 

Unless a sudden thaw or warm spell 
occurs during tk v week the plans for a 
wood-chopper's camp during the vaca- 
tion will have to be abandoned. Pro- 
fessor Uicks reports, after a trip of in- 
spection, there Is nearly three feet of 
snow in the woods and even the regular 
choppers have been obliged to lay off. 
The trees have to be dug out around 
before cutting can be done, and when 
felled, they go out of sight due to the 
lightness of the snuw. 

It was hoped that twelve husky men 
could be found who would go up to Mt. 
Toby for the entire Christmas moms. 
The men were to stay at the house on 
the mountain owned by the college and 
were to lie given their board. All they 
would be required to furnish, was 
blankets and a complete change of Hot b- 
ing. Most of the wood on the piece is 
birch, which is easy cutting for begin? 
ners. The men were to lie paid twenty 
cents an hour for a ten hour day. 

It is to be regretted that the present 
weather conditions will make the camp 
impossible. However, Professor Hicks 
believes that such a camp can be held 
at some later date, beginning on a Fri- 
day morning and lasting uniil Sunday. 
Besides the good work which can be 
accomplished in this way, the men will 
have a good time and gel some good 
practicable experience. 




The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. P. M. is mild, fragrant slow burning, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGl'E 

THAT'S WHY IT'S PERFECT 



2-oi. ran 
4-oz, tan 

s nz. tan 

1 1. -o/. can 



25 rents 
SO rents 

90 rents 
$1.80 



It IS ABSOLUTELY THE 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PRODUCED 



Manufactured by 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., Boston, U.S.A. 




TRACK PRACTISE TO START 
Manager Mittnon of the track team 
announces that practise will start this 
week as mm as the boards can be clean- 
ed off. It is expected thai a good team 
will be rounded into shape this winter, 
Which will probably compete at tin- \ 
li. A. meet, at the Coast Artillery meet, 
and will perhaps run dual meets with 
other colleges. Candidate* for mana- 
ger of track are to report to Manager 
Mat toon this week, 



No cotton need come mas- 
querading 'round here ! 

Our "acid test*' for all-wool 
will catch it every time. 

Everything men and boys 
wear. 

Prices moderate. 

MAIL ••HORRN FILLS!* 

Rogkrs Piibt Company 



■mad war 
st 1Mb St. 

Hiosdwsy 
at Wsrren 



The 
fear 

fjOHNfl" 
NSW YORK IITY 



Broad way 
st Stth St, 

Fifth Afl 
St 41.! St. 



IT'S CHEAPER 

to Buy a 

01 LAVAL 



Vmi set b» far toe great teat iriml VAl.lt 
f«r roar Money when yon bov s lie la vat— 
BErAlt*K it will give ran m orb better snri 
longer SEISVli K than an) r other Mparsmr 

The greater darsbllltv of the fj» I*vml. Hi 

i itiiM-t •hinitnlnir, cimlcr running, if tenter 
BBJNM i'.v and lessens* fur reimlm. ni.il.i- lb* 

prire «r Mm "cheap 
•st " mo tn in- ©a the 
market In mntty mint 
exorbitant ritmt«red 
with that of tto lie 
Laval. 

Not the nrat rod of 
s M-i'iinilor. bat the 
amount anil qualify of 
(fee service It will give 
»nn. nhoti let determine 
jour i-holre. 



Tlf BE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




1M HlliMliWAI 

»*W YORK 




Northampton Players 

This Week " SMITH " 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



FACULTY NOTES 

l'riit. A- <»■ I' 1 *"' 1 OI tk© poultry da- 
partnwn! mid t, H. GeekelJ superia- 
teadeai of llu * «»il«ga peutirj l«w 
upoke at tin- llami-ii-ii fiimiu League 
poultry show bald at the Springfield 
\,,,lii.'.riuiii. tlii" week. The college 

department! perated with the league 

itj tiu- show by •xblliitlog equipment 
ami arranglag lot the lecture* ami 
addfasaas, 

1'n.Iesw.r Wauuli is tluanilM'1 ..1 M 
ariH-lc in the last Issue <•! the Country 
'i,r, t is,ma„ entitled ••Alter the Apple 
Booa*" in whieh h# dsaertbaa bow the 
orchard burineas tea, during receai 
years, beaa broaghl t«> a sound sensible 
bnatneas. 



SOCIAL UNION ENTERTAINMENT 

[•in- Mt'.-.in.i SiK-ial Colon preaentatton 
t,,i tin* season was given In Bowker 
Auditorium M theevenlngof Sat unlay. 
l»,.,-. if, in i Ik- form "i ■ stereoptican 

lei-nut- .a- |»iH.i..|.. ul ie. The leclure. 

uiwn !>> Hi. U, 1». W illiaiii-iiii. wa^ sti|- 
l.letlit'lllrd l».v iMHiHtiU. -li.les. t< atm- 

|„g (be I m Of the ililt-iUvellet-: the 

Uopt iinil Nava'pi In. Hans. ili.M customs 
and life; views ul Hie ..Ul eiiv ui tattta 

Kc; tarHiiriiia. (he old inissioll-. t he 

Vi.seiti.ie valley t and the big um; the 
I'strltied h..iesi ; and the tiratMl < anyoti 
uf Aii/Kiia. 



ALUMNI MEET IN CHICAGO 
The annual meeting of lha Western 
Alumni Association of Maaeaehueeitg 
Auiiiuliiirul Cullege was h.-hl at the 
Union Leigue Club at Cblcago. Pfo» 
resent McNatl of the Animal Husban- 
dry Department represented the uollege 
ami spoke oti Ibe present aetivHIes of 
Aggie. Vmunjt tbe many alum a I pres- 
ent were Bheverlei >-■ Nichols "TH, 
Smith '!««. and Moroe '^- Many <»hl 
tiiiH-s were talked and laughed over. 



S. S. HYDE 

IB l'l*-;«i-:i i>t SIM'i'l 

iii-ullsttt' I'te*. m|.ii.'il- hilled, Broken i.<-^-<- 

Areuratelj K«|ilsred. I me W .n« l> lieisiir- 

in„ I'rmuptli and rtltllfttltj limie. 

Ktttlstai tloll i.lKilMllteeil. 



THE AIM 



BLADES SHARPENED 

turaiiv niuke id *afi-tj ni*or. 

«i ci;.v i -— .xi»n;«.*is; 

A line •■! iasVtBa ^<i|>*. ISlllslies, I UUlN anil 

H.uliei ■»iii>|iiii"' mi band. 



After twents-five years dose business association with the best dressed 

men in your college : . ,, 

To keep <>u.r lines of youno men's logs so utteily small and diMmiUM', 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an n.u.sually .mart - trench H overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Ccats, besi cost made. 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
our fam.s Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 

At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

,, - iii r t, ... - Amherst 

t a m pi on s block, 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



THOMAS '19 



3 North College 



FRESHMEN ELIGIBLE 

There WW I tuei'titm ot theh..eke> 

candidates to r a lu-i In Stnohfartdge 

Hail direct It sftei Chapsl, Mondaj !>••<•. 
17. The purpose <>t tbe lueetlna *as to 
announce lha ileeUimi ttl the sthletir 

Imanl in allnwiim the lre»,liitteti lu plsj 
on the varsity, if i-liir'- !•■• « hl-h-.m U*. 

Who called the HW«4iflI, MM!Hl!ltie«] 

thai (.raeti.e wmthl «.tart nunlath aH-t 
the Christmas rrresi. : a ml he tir^i «l all 
men to R(i|Uftiiil lheniH|.l\es with the 
pl.yt. ..t the expert* In I he Arena, it 
ilble. 



THE DINING HALL 

is ofTerino; must aUracti\i* i>«».inl 
t<i the student btuly. 

The gcl-tugctluT, suiij.rs ami 
college life, ami good limes cen- 
ter about the (lining halt. 

The can", leria ofTera a-la-carte 
service 

Tin* main timing ro<»m serves 
monlhh hoiinl. 



" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our SpSfSS*?— *•< <' ,l, ^ , K"' d ,l • ln ^ ,, to ,mt 

MK5. L. M. STKBBINS, 

Middh- street. Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. Ml-SI 



AMHERST SHOE REPAYING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Next in Camp ton's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 



The Highland Hotel AMHERST BOOK STORE 



REUNION IN HABANA 

An awldental mwtln« broinihi t.»- 
s£(Mher i|tiite a KSfheriiik' of M. \- • 
men to the hibby .»t the ll..t«*i nwm t» 
H»Uana, tbe eireolntt of No*. 84. l»ri*i»- 
eiit were fray "wi, Canlln *«x». I . .,n,ii i 
Hi, Hart *IH. ami NndaneHi ea'lB, OM 
times were bashed «vfr ami a littl* a«rt- 
u^ether j»lanne*l which will take place 
si the end »t thin •/atni*. .Uter biiv- 
Ini Pat Cardtn a high ci.llar, Reg Hart 
a hair-cut (he just bavioa inl i n to fn«nt 
the esnipoi, and givlBg ib*«i Awlerso* :t 
h».,k at the Hi>ti..rlt»», all »ald, "lla-ta 
I 



Drop in at 

"YE AGGIE INN" 

Meals, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



I ..ri.ei uf IliliKinli «"'» ISarni. Streen. thief 
1,1... k» fi..m «*"• » «il"'» USSOt. toB n.-iletii I."- 
trlti miim.i. tlte Kiii»tM-«iieiai«, M fcJiist s"t»ii 
f,,..„ M.,,„-1.-ei ..w.is tun.. »!••■ in.l«e ji.Mt.lH.t. 
ami v.! hi tlie . .i.t.r ..f Hi* biMlnvM »»l«til. i. 
|,,i,..,n*irew»n futi.ii«lie.l mil «i. inf.. n .1 •• 

hsvlns m t. iti.li..ii«' .mil t.i.t ssd .-ill Miiiiiini.' 
«,t.-t I- ...-•* ».....„ i-ii.e.si sad ..I., n * 

Wtthiwtii ■ImkIi- • fl.SOnit.l Uf. 

Il.ei.eltent i ulMlie ii,.l well % . i,i il.it.il illli 
• in ■:■! i |.l.;i*:ml mi-Mi, -is 
ihli.U^'f 'lie lliseli»«l MHMlili, Hell ,...-t...l 

uiAiiiurr. 

II, ,i.l •• aiul >i-U »iil 

MrttHpst* rti Ma* eeeti 

HIM. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Hlsatssi B««. farles-Hel*. Mass. 



Note Books 



Fountain Pens 



ABelitB fm Hen T$l>ewiltfi 



F. M. CUKHAN 



C. F. DYER 




RAHAR'S INN 

XetUeuavtes Mj««»»-ti«iw»tu 

EUIOFEAN FLAM 




bents Van Ab-nne M« nu#t«Ii.e,l » Run for Aggie MCll 
i*rtot|s Injury last week when hr f«ll «>ti , 



the tee. He was hnrt last stimmcr by a 
fall fr*im a load »l lny whb-Ii resatted 
in an injury to hi* spine fnnn which be 
was just recoytrina. At presew l bet* 
ai his bomein KinibrhiH.k. N. N , li h 
expected hewtHretHrn aiterChrtslww 
raeatlun. 



By ARgie Men 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

%1 M,iin Street, Matonk HttUdisg. 
Northampton, Masn 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUUS AND CARPETS 

K l» MAIIMI WTTATK — 

RWltklHtP 1WWS 

Htkimikn I iA h m Fot.t. ^ v. «!»«. 

M»srrMTt»sis« jw»slsm 
IWi HWIMIIWAY. NBW YORK 

IM.I'II AN1I <JtnA*K*tK 

IMN'K AN'U HIHUS* rf 

«,,,i.i» -in *■«■.« *i«r» wiiftinsr «»i'»i." 

DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

< »-.». «.|Wttll 



W Main m, 

\<il'llllllll|ll<>l>. Mil 



CfoSfil 



i ,\r. m 4 a, m 



Johnson Book Go. 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -> 



H. I SMULDliS -19W 



What will your 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Tr«ewiir«r*i CWkt^ $U9 postpaid 

Alumni will fincl g«',«l r»W Aggta rectflli-itimw brought 

back by thia. 



The Holyoke Valve S Hydrant Co. 

J„htieni *»f Wr..«i(fh! Iri.n nt,t HjnMI l.l*. 
Vaivn "Hi! t'lttlnc* f»r «"■»»•. «»»• 
Urn, A»tp^»«i BH4 M««tM"«i* li»ller •ml I It* 
I 'KVMllHPi- lit* 1 lit t..«fcf»«-l1 Mill »ii|.t.lli» 
fngUtrrrm anil I iitrtrirtnrt fur t»le«!M ■«« 
H«.i W«ter Hf-.ttinir A »*•«< ,.>'». Hturlnl 
Wminm t Brtta- «*« Brwlr « < ".. 

tlnlv • Vr , s tsss . 

PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY OINNERS 

European Plan 



BABBITT *18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

Writing Paper 

With Otis Niwinli «l Collegi Seals 

AH kinds »r 

Looie-leaf Boohs and Founta i n 

and 



J. HASTIN< 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



X 



It 




— 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



MECKMANVS 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** IIAMP »• 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

is richer in proteiu than iimsl meals 
and is very iniieli cheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 



A Isk try our i 



tr l;mev eji.-cse 



I 



TOWN HALL 



I Francei Nelson in "The 

ur.j_..j_. Power of Decision" 

Wednesday, p earl Wnile in .. The Falal 

Dee. 19 Ring" 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Drew 
in Comedy 



Neufchatel 
Olive 



Pimento 
Club 



Elsie Janis in " 'Twas Ever 
Thursday. Thus" ami 

Wallace Reid and Myrtle 

S ted man in "The Prison 

Without Walls" 



Dec. 20 



Friday, 
Dec. 21 



Saturday, 

m 



Monday and 
Tuesday. 

24 
and 25 



Wednesday, 
Dec. 26 



Mae Murray in"0n Record" 
Bobby Connelly in 

"Bobby Philanthropist" 
Paramount Pictoeraph 

James Morrison in "The 

Alibi" 
Pathe News Weekly 
"The FiBhtin* Trail" 

Bin V Comedy 

Knthlvn Willi a mm In 
"The Ne er Do Well 

* j.att*. 

Greater than Hit* book. Her 

tiM than The "-luiih-f* ' Vi 

tlnii ai-thm .ill tii«- «raj 
Ne Advance in Prices 

Mabel Taliaferro in 
"A Magdalene of the Hills" 
Pearl White in "The Fatal 

Ring" 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Drew 

in Comedy 



All product a made from panteur- 
Ized milk and ereaui. 



Dairy Department 

Mass. A |irirnltural College. 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St.. Amherst, Maai. 

« Mli< e llmirs : [-8, %■$ p, m. Sunduy ami 
oilier hoars by appointment. 



Th*tc *ri. S»»- , , . , , ■; • ts<>>whny you *h>uld 
buy vou- 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

w ilk down town ami create an a ppettf . 
Hert- I* wlittc Mill rlrnl the i>ie«i ntiithrr inakf*. 



titiod Service and Reasonable Prices 



and College photographers . . . 




5fwo 



.'jHHIli* illMiS 

4iinijmjaw 



5a Center St.. Northampton Mais., 

Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS a NO POULTRY DRESSERS 

WHtH,K!*A(.l. t»\l V 

Mutton, Lamb, Vtal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Saw 
sages. Poultry, Oamr, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils, 



Blackwiotie, North and Msffh <>n«rr> street*. 
BOSTON, .... flASS. 



Russell, Burdsall £ Ward Bolt and Nut Go. 

PORT CUKSTKK. NKW YORK 

orrAMi.ixHKii . 



rtitiri t»f 
The Celebrated 




BOLTS and 
NUTS 



MUSICAL CLUBS' CONCERT 

AND DANCE AT HADLEY 

The liist Combined tDUBlCB] elnh eon- 
cert and dance of the year frill take 
place at the Iladley Town hall, .Jan. 4, 

and although the clubs will be smaller 

than in former years the prospects look 

good tor just as high class a concert as 

has always bean yiven by the M. A. <'. 
clubs. Ah condition* now present them- 
selves, ami on account of some things 
which have taken place, the only leader 
to be lost is the leader of the t»U*e elnh. 
Howard (roll, who has* gone into the 
radio service. His place will be taken 
l>\ Charles Crowe Hi. ft. ('. Johnson 
has deeideil not to leave college M pres- 
ent ho will eon I'm tie to lead I he orchestra, 
A ilrniniinr is needed very badly 

The eom-eit to he nheli in I he 8prill)f< 
lield Auditorium Jan. 11 will he one of 
ihe biggest eomeris of the \ear, and 
will, in a way, lake Kbe plane of the 
annual eotnen and (ianeeatlhe Kim- 
hall. The concert will last from tt-16 to 
W-30 and dancing will follow until 
twelve. 

The tentative pngraut to be followed 
thin year lollown: 
1. Overture, Mandolin* Inb 

«. Hi till* HlUlttl 

b. fstai apMgM Ban ne r 

g, l.mrlj Night l.lreUul. 

;*. I'lipiilai l*n!|.(llrt M .1 .fi.lin Mvtiti.. 

J. (M'li-i tiniiB iniallit 

l.a.l> liaiHl* ftUtttMili (Till. 

hKHMiwuiiv, 

• S.i limit Mm < liih 

T. l.tiitleit uf |io- ,im- Mandolin 1 tuft 

a I'uimliir ite\U« (Jii.'itlt-I 

u i nt.il.- wtim Mandolin ftilu 

10. Ln»nJ turn* uf uld Maanrlmaiu 

t 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Continued from page a] 
Speaking of the Freneh "Madainoi- 



il 



e\ are of different type but 



C&rpervter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



Nn 1 Cook Plarp 

1&\\y your 

A»a White 

If tooth 



Amher.t \f 



»«*, 




»ooh flow 

Art ChnmHrr 

tSfc.iiftt 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

"tuir S'ai iotiai r*ore*ta" to in* fires 

!»> Prof, 1 rank A. Waugh ai AMWIubly, 

M. A 1 . Ue.i.M'vi.iv, IKh-. ifJ, 

Professor Ufantih will sfeww 7u cidured 
lantern slidew rnravtag the Kruiitui «.| 
bis work for the 1, .V Koretu h#rv|e« 
duiinu the psjM summer, the National 
Koiesis are mainly on the three urea! 
moil 11 lain rs«tn:»*i», tfo* Sjerm*, the Ii... I>- 
leu and the Appalachian «>«(*t». The) 
eover an area o| |.Vl,<NMt,uut>nf*tvw, alN»ut 
31 liliies I he Ki/.e of the plate of Ma**a- 

chUMCltM. They mnm firm lor the pm< 
dtictinti of limber, 1 lie present innutl 

.iiitput retiirninu »I..Vli.liHl hi Hie Inn 

crntuent, rcpre*enliita ab«»ut aa,(ai"),(Mi 
worth of tin is bed tlmfH'r in prtntarjr 
markets. The ior»«i iandk »rc *l*o ejk- 
teiiinirely uxetl for grmaint. Alxint 
l4.UftlMH>tl cattie and sheep are carried 
each yc»r, tor wiilt'h the Koierntiteni 
receive umilnsf fee* ,,[ n.atiyuu f i, P 
(., rests also pruteet IrnfMiftnBl watpr 
-hill*, I k*»j are aI»o ti«ed e vieti»tvelj 
for runny foriii* of rerreallon, »Ipi»ui 
H.immi.ikmi |,er«.in« itiiifinijfbrm anrinnlly 
for swell pwrpeata, i*rofe*«or UaittjJi 
ajtguos tltAi If any Urasunalde mmmmt* 
cial valiiBiloii i« jiiarCTl on thlt iMMBt 
of rei rent sun it will h# ibown to jmj a 
lamer return fa fbe n»fh»B than ail 
other ineottie from the fi«re»»». 

slide* will hImi lw fthowu of ihe (traod 
< .invi.n, wliirh i* Hiolef J/ofT»«t IkM^hm 

luanatfrini'iit, «»f the Uottsevelt dam 

seel loft, and of a binhlr ««rr«wifrj[I 
muiiiispal eamp «»n the A»ir«**» f«rest 
near I,f» Anifeieit in tMifliltiin, iiitt 
extended t,,u<*\ and moninal» irw-i on 
t he M»»ieo line Whirl) Is Iieliiij dcvclopfii 
n« a summer lioinc eoliiny list tb# re«i- 
dctttwol >iui iJlegoanil the Ft«|ier»M! Val- 
ley* of the Columbia in«iiw»y msar 
I'oiilniiil. (rreaoni irf Luke ( hclati in 
W"a«bini(t«ii and ..I 1 lie While M»nu<»in] 

forests in Sew ilniii jstiiie. | In •l; I |,«j 

;ir* I ii r n i— ti ••«! | f the I 

\\ asiiiriMlon 

made liy i'ri»fe»siir Waash. 



1 here are some inij-hty line looking 
yoiin-j ladies however at least some uf 
tlte hoys seem to think so. Know n- 
me you naturally understand that I am 
bullet proof in this respeel hut I am 
sure tiiat you would ieel at home here. 
In lael I think you'd work your note- 
liodk ami sky Idue tie overtime. The 
people are very poor and their bouses 
in this seel ion are in ruins, 

1 havi- also seen the MOBt famous 
eailiedral in France now standiug. It 
i- simply wonderful both in its fuas- 
siveucss and ils beauty. Althou-rh 
protected by sandbags most of it is \isi- 
hie. It is tilled with statuary and rare 
paint iutrs, cloisters, confession booths, 

and smb. The altar was ihe most Lean 
lifiil of the different things however. 
At.i.w L. 1-oNti T9, 



COUNTY AGENTS MEET FOR 
FIFTH ANNNAL CONFERENCE 

What will we do next year? How 
shall we handle the various agricul- 
tural problems thai confront us, and 
how may we hest coopera te for the ad- 
vaneeinent uf agriculture In Massacbu- 
sprta? These are some of the ques- 
tion* being considered this week at 
the tilth annual conference of county 
afccnis, v oc ational agricultural directors 
and iitstriu tors.and allied grou p* of a«ri- 
euliural workers throughout the slate, 
I hi. nmference, which has become 
known on (be i.impus as (ouniy Agent 
week was formerly openetl yesterday 
afternij.»n in .NtockbrhlKc Hall when 
PrMident Hutterbeld, llufus W. Slim- 
«..u of the State Board of Kd neat ion and 
■. IC Parker. OsfMlf Agent Leader, 
spoke in the 150 agrieultnral workers 
on ihe various problems confronting 
tin airrtcnltttral world. 

rnlloatng this the group broke up 
into sect iona l cooffrances for t be con- 
sitleraliitn of sjicrial problems. I^ant 
evening the group met in the Hticlal 
I iiiorj rtJimis for an informal social 
gathering, A volunteer orchestra from 
the stu dent body produced musie for 
an old time Virginia reel, and a few of 
the Store lumlem dances, 

A pronram of ibis type will be carried 
rmMhnmgh thereat of the week. Sec* 
tkmai mrfi In-fs will be held every day, 
with general annemhlie* for dlMUMUm 
and bu«lBe« action. In the evenings 
some fi>rm cd leelure or entertainnieni 
aiillw glTen. In tin* way it Is hoped 
to j-ei ail the old ideas and new ones 
thrwbed out, worked over, ami put into 
working form for ihe eoming year. 

Many excellent speakers are ached* 
■1*4 to help the work. P resident Hut- 
ferteid, will talk at several of the meet- 
ings, 1 I Mirk* will tell something 
of the work of agpplying the farmer 
with labor, K, II. Korbunb, formeih of 
the eafewdoo service of (be state will 
talk on Karw Ijoan Associations, nna of 
the great ns ti o n al scbereea to help the 
farmer. 

William ft Hard will be hack from 
Waablagtott to give one or two talks on 
Kxten*ton Serf ice. Many other mem- 
b#r» rf the eol \rgr faculty will help out 
in th« 11 1 menfs, 



<,ririlie 
,t I nfltftifl 



•iieiii' elataaa a descend ant 

in Kuatit: Fann Vi. a ntu« 
wle> «;n> he is alile to trace bis 
genealogy back Ti general ions. 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 
Kvery young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's a 
"dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO., &£%&t 




TO WRITE FOR RUSSIANS 
Tin- Government committee <>n Public 
Information baa asked Prof. Robert w. 
Wai to prepare material tot circulation 
abroad, especially la Russia, by its 
foreign press bureau, 

"Today's Short Stories Analy/.ed," a 
volume by Prof, Seal, dealing wilh lbs 
art and technique of short fiction, to ae- 

oompany bis "Short Stories i» the Mak- 
ing," is announced for early publica- 
tion by the Oxford University Press. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

itesi'b, I.tiM'oln ami gt BfStoB Bfel ■ 
BOSTON, HASS. 



Only two blmk» fri.iu Suuiti Teriiiinal Bta- 
uon.atiii ssatto raseaad freai KorthBtstiou 
by Klevkted Kaflwar. and eoBVaafcnrt alikf 
|« the ureal retail ihujaand bu«ine»»i eiitu-. 
also to the theattes and iriare- of UlterSHt. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

1 abb- and service unsurnas-ed. 
Booklet and man aent BBSS! ait|»liratiun 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

as a few vacancies in 
the Dining Room. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

It has been announced that the Vassar 

ambulance section In t'ranee has 1 u 

decorated with the medal .-r the tn.tv 
tie (Juerre, 

(hi I'si at Amherst College attained 

the highest s.-hoiastie average tot the 

college duriBB 1«.M#, 1H17 with an average 
of HI. (MS per cent, 

Inaugurated bj Um- eui.tain of the 
Tufts' ioothall i.am. a fad for kniltinu 
has l.r.iken out among the men of that 
institution, A lecture on theoretical 
chemistry was nearly disorganized n- 

ceotly by tin* a»Bear»a«« <»'' dEbt 
prominent athletes with needles and 
highly colored yarn, Women are tor- 
bidden to knit in classes, hut there is 

no rule retarding men. 

Announcement lias been made that 
Middleliury college would cJoae a month 

earlier than usual next Spring in order 
to iji\e the students a better opportunity 

to help their country during the sum- 
mer by eugaglnu in agricultural or other 

patriotic service. I lie shortening of the 
College year will UOi inv..h.- curtail- 
ment ot ihe courses, however, as the 
vacation periods at Christmas and 
Kaster will be «<«t do«u. It is planned 
lo bold ei.uimencement May ti in**ead 
of in June. 



THIS IS JUST THE WKATIIKR FOR A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Ours arc going fast but WC still have some o;ood ones. 

$6.50 to $24.00 

We have just received a new line ol 



Reversible Custom Made Shirts 

that ftft worth the una* over. 

Prices - $1.50 to $5.00 

New Nsclueir 50c to $1 .50 Flannel Shirts all prices Freshman Toques 75c ^ 

Suits and Overcoats from $12 to $25 



PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

.Northampton, Maee. 

Where the Best 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

PROT.HAM (HAM.rn BAIL* 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Schaflner & Marx Clothes 



\ 



THE DAVENPORT 

A homelike stopping place lor ••Aggie" men. 

A new, modern house with every convenience. 

'PHI PARTIES, BANQUETS, *c 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drug's 



The next issue of 
The Collegi 
will appear 
January 8, 1918 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, 



Pleasant St. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 



Write t«*«l»t>' 



t**w iirlot'M «»** 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

18B7 T^* »■»*■*•« *■"»»«* ■•anaara' fin* Hrtr Taan 1917 

Ask For Ow Crop Sorts. Wi Wat Mm AftHs hi UnxcifW Twl»f 



AflUMM Aijeno.v Mnn«««r 



Candy 



Amherst, 






THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 



i 



««!il,i.i(liar* »f the I 



1r*n Agrlr-nittirnl < Ii 



51 CHAMBERS STREET 



YOMOTf 



a afla aada f « *.*.*.i »^ 



1 1 isi 



V 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1917. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'71.— Dr. Boberi \v. Lyman is the 
proud possessor of his fourth degree. 
In win be I't'ceivt'ii the degtee of Hoc- 
tor of Civil Laws from Yale. Last sum- 
mer be completed the wo rlc for the de- 
cree of Dr. of Laws iii Curse? at Miehi- 
gan Law school and recetttty received 
his diploma for t lie same. 

■'.»•!.— Krford W. Poole, who has been 
tor nearly eighteen years wiih the '/.. B, 
Davis Corporal inn, Kuilders, as Kstiina- 
tor and Draftsman, is now associated 
with Frank (Milton lirown, architect of 
New Bedford. This linn has recently 
received a commission to prepare plans 
and specifications for a new sixteen 
room building for the eily. 
• Mr. Poole is also serving as Battalion 
Adjutant with the rank of First Lieu- 
tenant, in the 1st Battery, 17th Regi- 
ment Mass. State Boards, 

HH>.— Charles M. Walker has resigned 
asheadoftiie Slide department of the 
Charles Besseler Co.. New York Ciiy 
and accepted an appointment in (he 
Adjutant Generals department at Wash- 
ington, D. c. 

'13.— D. W. O'Brien of Wayland has 
lieen appointed farm labor agent by the 
I'nited States Department of Agricul- 
ture. Since graduation from M.A.i. 
O'brien has been instruct. n at Leomin- 
ster Eligb School. 

'15.— A son was born to Mr. and Mr* 
W.C.Kennedy Dee. »th. The new ar- 
rival has been named Donald Saywaid. 

es-'iS. — A daughter was born to Mr. 
aad Mrs. Win. LI. McKee of I'ittstield, 
ttee, 13. 

ex-*20.— Gunner Alfred W. Turn.,, 
number 1.261,914. D Battery f. I; \ 
Wifely Camp, England. 



PHT8IC8 DEPT. WILL USE 
NEW ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

M. A. C. is the fourth college lathe 
•late to adopt the so-called Evans Pro- 
gressive Electro-Dynamic Equipment, 
already in use In over 50 of the colleges 
and universities of the country. 

The particular advantage which ap- 
peals to a man studying electricity U 
that it enables him to coordinate him 
theory and practice at all stage* of his 
study, moat particularly with the vari- 
ous standard forms of direct and slier 
natlng motors mad dynamo*. 

The apparatus, which has a load ca- 
pacity of three-fourth.. II. P., li 
thoroughly disscctlble and conform* to 
the latest practice in eomDerelsl 
machines. 



REAL FARMING 

A, Victor Petit Is in company with 
K. Walter Ilnlburt *1S and Foster K. 
Baker '1*. under lbs firm nsrne of 
Brook aide Farm Co. of Sheffield, raised 
the following crops last spring and 
summer, doing all the work thema#iven; 
nun bushels potato**, 830 bushels eorn, 
100 bushels of bu«-kwhem, iw bnaho fai 
rutabaga turnip*. SI buwbels Imatni, 
*ft bn«b»?s»w««t eorn, if} bnsheU rye, 
and %t aofes of bay. In September 
pet ii initialed in the regular army Mini 
wan nenf to the military •■amp nt Mrra* 
rime, V V . and from there U> Cuip 
tireeii . • riJiriotfe. S . I '. ; wait W art's 

m Corporal Vov. Hrd and i» mm m 

aetpeant. " Vie'* i« one of ■ gh( mrtt in 

|il« it.iii j. iiriy who U fiii.ii iii^triii i ,,,],« 
iri tioxittif *>> 'Jul, Rntte, and i« ;«!«•«• r,n 
lb* regimental !«•*,! hall team. 



College Candy Kitchen 


OPEN ALL THE TIME 


THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 


HOME-MADE CANDIES 


Chocolates, Pudges, Caramels 


and a Large Line of 


Hard Candies 


ALSO SALTED NUTS 


At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 


Ices and a lot of other things 


to eat and drink 


OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



COLLEGIAN 

Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on [ntercol. Athletics. 

M. A. C. Athletic Field \svj» uttioti, 

Noti- Athletic Association, 

the College Senate, 

Track Association, 

M »« key A ssoci ation, 

H.iskeiball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M, A. C. Christian Assoctttioti, 

Fraternity Conft rente, 

Lnterclas* Athletic Committre, 



DIRECTORY 

Telephone 
C \. Peters, Secretary— 454 \V 

K. \ ,M< 1. uigh I in. Secretary— 530 

C S, Hicks, Treasurer— 403-M 

H K. Robbins, Manager — res, 6j-VV 

H L, Russell, President ^-416 

C. G. M.utoon, Manager— 8338 W 

W, S lawyer, Manager— 543 

I A. Chapman, Manager 8314 

ft II, Caulett, Proident— 8338 \V 

M. ft Evans, Manager— 8347 

% M. BurTum, M.n..i-«r 8338 W 

R. I,. Boyd. I'f.MdetU— 416 

H. L. Russell. President -t 19- R 
f) CI, Pratt, Secretary— 8374 



lg r s t Co - op. 




Through the ;ini of f !»** Kn« full War 

» .iiiilFit»»l«»ii, a battery of »*tfiiily li\i' 

niUIifiM .itiii'liMil l<ii 

in 1 h*' I; 1 1 I I il 1 .iii 1 




Collet Work 

IO-15c 
f 1-2* 

IMt 

|MT do/. 



High-Gn 

Shirt*, 
,f "..liar*. - 
CiiR. 

I'laln W,i„h, 
?>!Uiu- rough «lrv. 



Dry (loaning and FrmsiBg 

strum i'!i««iiiiif 40c, ;t «hiiim Uit 

IPTJ I leaning ami I'rrtnfni;, $1.50 a SttH 



||| IiilU |.i% till*- .it I .tliryr Mlf.ir f, fi.l |t|§fcvis 

fl llurr will itHPite |ir<tiii| > l wllp«itl,t»t 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



■AT- 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the Surges! stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOe-MAN 

CARS 

M. A C, l«»r Holyokc ?-jo ard hourlv 
until us© P. M, 

M. A C" for Amtiersl 6 10.6-45, ?-»°» 7*5°' 
S^j. S-zo, then so mm. mi.u J5 inm. 
alter the hour until 10-20 H, m Other 
C»ri at 1 1-50 A, M.. j 50. 5 so. 7-50, y 50. 
10-jQ p, M , Mtid a last car at 1 1-20 P. m 

Amherst lor M. A. C. 6e|. 6^3©, then 
hall hourly unt*l S 00 A. M , S 15, 9-15. 
turn 1$ mm and 30 mm. mi t* 1 thr dour 
unt'l it 30 P, M, Other ram Mt 12-00 
noon Mint 4 00, 600, S 00.10 se p, m. and 
a la»t ear at 12 jo P. m. 

Hpeclal Car* at Reasonable Umtt » 



AMHERST I SUNDERLAND SI, RY. CO 



LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

ORESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

II A -11 I > V ■ „ , , , 



(i, K. Bahbii 1**17, Alpha ^r AmA |*in HotrM K, K. (ciikJk.'jo, College Stort 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

Ktom Am hem, via Northampton, 
through th*« HaifleJda, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml.. alortfsro*e the 
famous Bloody \'t<> >k hatile yrourtd 
tn Old heiTfitlri. thente to <*.iwn« 
firld, Turrwrs KalU and ar ram thf 
" Plain « " to tjmkt r*te««ttt, Mont». 
gye and Hillerfl Kalt«, 

50 mm* of Trackaca Hodrrn 
rquipmrnt train DUpatch- 
\n% System Freight and } *- 
presa Aarvlca over ent Ire line . 

Connecticut Valley Stmt Railway 





JAN 1 mi 




AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIH. 

FIRST BASKETBALL GAME j 
A VICTORY FOR M. A. C. 

Connecticut Aggies Defeated 25-20 
in Close Contest. Capt. Mc- 
Carthy and Parkhurst Star. 

U. A. Cope I Ita aecoad ^um.h <«f 

resurrected r*r«Uj baakatUal! w«" « 

,.!,. UI , cut rlcton ons the Coaaeeticul 

kgflea in (>»<* Atiimiy last Sutur.la> 

ati'iu.H.n bj the score SB SO. Tea btrjn 

„, ii.i- s.i >g mui.- bad lb* advantage 

l» »„ tar u lata nada tbait third 
name, bavin* «p Ul ataa wnh Weatayan. 
,,,, the whole, Oanaaeiksat bad a 
ra,t team abteh reeortad aioetlj (•» 
sbort paaalag and eloat »«ga ^i'" 1 -- 
wbile tin- boaM taaia wai art ap >«• ihe 
mark in Ita pa«dai Rama, wbleb •»■ *> 
thiHs M.iutwhat ragged, tti.-ii a.iunitu 
K&wttng taabled tboai t«» ee«a*«l with I 
id.- rluu ti'in tin- loot ni.»re «iiti't» 

Th« gMM ««s ooaspteautta i<»i tli»- 
large noaibai at toaia, both lacbaleal 
and pafaosaJ, a la«e nuuii.er betag 
,-ailcl oa th- B*s siataw, and tbaaa »■»- 
abled their eppuMatt W faltafl tl'« r 

ln,.,i ■ 1 1 .i-al- m ' N >'« •"' ,h ^ ■ 

na vaagoad tottadiBg tbartag |, " ln 
the tl.M.r he hvl difBealty in "sinkiny:"' 
the hall fo.m tba t.»u! line, afaet wbieh 
VM reepooalbta ia keeplne >!««• M. \. 
, , (t . »i,,vmi in the teraattaa, 

. loooetleat atariad with tba wbUtle, 
and »lm««t before the UHM -«wlt* 
lagtd i-Uveiawata iwake Iih-I *e<.re.i 
two ba*ket» iu mueemiioH. during the 
rlr»t two minute* of platjr. before Me- 
I ufbj dropped in a pretty one for M. 

v , -/, tiJ-l -eore. Tile tir»t period WM 

with -*eral pretty ahot*. The 
, ,, | tba tir*t half fli IT-Ja— the 

ta . ilag to Mawaelmaotta. 
' ri„. „..„ihI half f« nlower. each 

,,,, | point f»r point, 

arkhnrm «.i» . *er> where 4.0 thefcot, 
,n,i pl..wl ;. »;eilnr gam, Tfaeaa»e i 
Bti.lfii wiih M \ C. lead tag 3ft.*). 

tor ' niiio't m» mi t 'apt. Uukwooo tad 
t,.MHin. -l, I u -i. the laiiereipeeijilly 
bad » ff'«"l '**• ,,,r lh » b»* krt imiTop- 
pfna la f..«tu. I'Hrkh.n.t M«rre,i for 
St. A. U, wtih a bteliar defeii»i\e gane 
and hi* rapKlitV in eo%eritig I he .„nr -. 
aibtle Me« arthj did ireU on the ..if .■•»-.-. 
vttb a 1 a* aMIU j la* paaalwr. dodglag 

During tba ball the band f.irni.be.1 
avtCTtalnnient. Hod the eheeritisi 
lion. j«*rehe.i ■•» the l.leaeben at the 
mmb en.l of the tnh, m».ie t»»elf hri.r.i 



Amherst, Mass M Tuesday, January 8, 1918. 



No. 11 



TO AGGIE MEN IN SERVICE 



\ baa*) word «-i graaitaf t<» the 

three bnii.lre.lit.Hllifty Aggie men- 

andergradaataa, alumni aad former 

student* who are now with! he eul.-r,. 

Kitty of you are already in Ha...... 

We Who are left on tlie eampus are 
proud of vou we alraoat aa*y >»«»• 
\v. bare triad toabowonrbaelilagol 

yoa and v»>r bWt h in arms by 

pledging ovarltOOQ b« th «* Y - *' ( ' 

\. ami WOfk-a f* «apita re.oid 

aqoalled bylaw eettogaa la Amenea. 

Tin-. ;n" groat dayt. '8wHi 
yon aay. "&&< puz/.Hng. tragie 
daya,bol great.'- Ye-. Hie greatest 

day erf all btatory. And tba y©«ni 
manhood of Awerica haarlean to the 

\mm». IhHf.oneof.be be,. thingM 

nboiit it all. 

"alt the world"* uw;.k.- 
•|(. Mie »t..r> "! tlie gi'ilT 
Tltal i» win f"r reaagajaa*! -;>!'■ 



I am not sure that you will bati ■ 
"merry" Christmas; but I am iUI« 
,l ial yi,u will have a rieb Cbrtatmaa, 
just bocnUM you are a part of the 
treat »trugala for world freedom. 

The College is anxious to keep in 
totiefa with all its men who arr« in 

military ■enrlea el any kind, and to 
that and l wlab "• '« r « e ,,,:U >"" 
heap us lafonaad as to yotsraddtaea 

We want to hear lioin you ami 

aha ut >ou. As yea get Into the bat- 
tle area, we shall be aaalooi lot yoa 
,,t DOOtaa; but not so anxious us re- 
juteilig that .VOU belong to II*. I 

iseafcfar trnateeenndfaetiitj alike. 

\a\ me also give you for Mrs. But- 
terfiald aad MyaaU heartiest personal 
freodwtabaaandt i. rtataaa greetings. 

Vi.uis trarj -imcrely, 
Kr.wo.N L. I'.t nt.HHi.t.ii, 

President. 



MUSICAL CLUBS' CONCERT 

IN SPRINGFIELD FRIDAY 

Arrangement. Hade for Attractive 

Concert at Auditorium. Open 

to Public. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE OF 8 

CONTESTS IS ANNOUNCED 

Two Open Datea Owing to Recent 

Cancel latione. Three Games 

at Home. 




•? 






! | iinenp; 

1 \ t , 
JjiM-kwood u-Bpt n 
M.w.re, it 
Ryan. If 
t.ooiiriMi, i 
pnarol lb 

I lei - 
Mam-heater, rb 



U \- « 
rf. >!■• ' 

;t. Man si 
If. Itlebardi* 
i% Blaaebaffd 

r. Whittle 

rb, I^ut 

lb. Parkbont 



The Musieal t tub* eoneert an.l dam ••• 
,„ be held in springliebi tbU WOah 
Friday i* t« ba I ditteient affair than 
that of previous years. Etlata ba bald 
atthe.'springtield Auditorial and will 
l^opentothepublie. It olll not b. a 
drea. eull affair a* tnai.> people are Ot 
lb e. .pinion it will be; entirely .ntormal. 

The eoneert at Hadiev I tidav ntgbt 

waa wry maeaailtil. i*.n« «»« ** '"" 
cert of the .-lubs tbtl year, an.l the 
M.ru.gl.eldeomertwilll.e aVM beUer 
, „,. orebeatr* this year is eaaipoaM « 

r , ,,,,.,,-s ineiilihng a saxophone and a 
.htrinr. and piavs ex.r.melv well for 

daneiug. 

,he eoneert will I* fro™ Mi m 
ttM and da*eina will toMo* uutil 
Ji Tb«e wishing to return t« Am- 
hM ,t tba. a.gbl «au l»t the U-» 
lrtlII1 Sprlnafleld wbreb o.nnaei. with 
, |H . i a .f ear from tlolyoke to Ambarat, 

n„ aeeoaat ot aereraJ .hangei in th« 
rf »ha ean*rd by the h«- -i *»•«'- «'«» 
tbe program for the year haa bwtB 
ebanaed. and will be a* followa; 

PvRt I 

I. (MKrtu™ "T*#f«« 

||aj i,,!**:*!! * Mil* 

% Medirt ..f - pea. 

Dan ii it i« wll 

i t.tfi. 



§#Teral change* have been made in 

[tnabockaj s.-bedule, m both M. I, T. 

game* hare bee,, caneel lad, and three 

new game*. IW« «itl, BpringAald and 
MM with Dartmouth have hewn added. 
Two open date* are left on (he .< hedule 
hut the manager expert, to obtain *.me 
I k«mmI games t.. till the plaee. 
1 Tlie eorreet hoekey »ebedu!e la: 
,!an li. Hen«»elaer I*. I. at Troy. 

19, Williamaat Wllllamatowii. 

a, .Springfield at Springfield. 

m, Qpaa. 

W, Open. 
Feb. -'. We*> Point at Went Point, 
y, liaiHu'iuth at M, .4. C, 

\'J, Wiiilam- at M. II. ' 

Ifi. Dartmouth a) llam.ver. 

«, Springfleld at M. A. C, 



tJIlt* t»ai»»." _. , 

j lmB ,l,.H„ » lull 



s^lrit^t 

Wt*4t 

Ml 

mm 



I'AMI II. 



*l-/t. 



M. \ < •, C,A • -" tioali 



t, "TtJefw** • t*»*«« Iff* T r * ,i ' 



,»s«iwte€ 

hrr. t»f * •<•*< '» •■•t'to'll 

Kni*rit -W 



HOCKEY SEASON OPENS 

SATURDAY WITH R.P.I. GAME 

The opening game of the hoekey 

ichedule will be played against Hen«««I« 
apr I- olyter linie Inatitu'e. Saturday, at 
Troy. N. V. Hen-*elaer wa- d.-fested 
in h»-r llrii gam- of the season ln«i Sat- 
■ ifda* )»v "'I' •«»!« to the tune «»f 14 t" 
oand by «h*> appearand ei Ibal 
\ggie should ha*e no iMiwohj la 
winning. The l..« kev men under the 
, barge ..f Captata ' bi.l...lm will depart 
Friday afteruix.n t«.r Troy. arriTing 
fber»ab..ut -eveii..'.l..ek in the even- 
lag. The night will be ipent at the 
vart.ina fraternity bonaea. Nine men 
will make the frp »m«ng whom are 
MeCartj ft, Laaeltt ai. 'rafts *h 
RjBltk *». Keadiug 'jW. Faxon '19 and 
(•hisliolm *iW. 



ANNUAL ALUMNI DAY TO 
BE OBSERVED ON JAN. 25 

Interesting Talks to be Given to Stu- 
dents on Friday by Relum- 
ing Graduates. 

The ;..int eotauiUtM liww rt*« > 
elate Alumni ami Interirati 
ti-ifin-f have near 1) n*nt| ■ • " I 1 

lor alumni I >a y . a bleb i 

day. Jan *5. 1' 1- planned in 
many of t h»- leal area ul 
gathering, «Ui< h broke all r*« 
mamban and entbaaiaant. li h«« 
arraagad lo b i*a alnmnl a.tdr.— 
ragotai elaaaaa ■-.. m- i *•• 

lyateaj el i al ■ II be ia torw . 
ktudcau in--. ■ ■ aaagei 
tend lectorei b) grada nee on 
in wh:.h the) i 

Thin ayitaa a ■• rb a '* " 

taatal l*e< alUra 

atletid i he satin 

tnreaaatbt nralaaBi 

i,H.nv more Mil 
tbaaelaeturai ■ 
etaoMBan will be r '-'i • 
regulat rlanwes but ma) i - 
turm« rrurin^t I 
that tbeea addraaaea 
ot "major talk*," la wklek Ihi 
receive mactj iabh 

Than will bi -'i'" ii- 

,[, tht i •■ Bg. > ! "' ,L "' 4 "' 1 " l ' 

include mair. "t lb* 
alumni. i mu»ieai < I ■• ■ 
Howker Midii.Tinm will «•».) 
program tot Ft iday 

[t i, hopad that a TaftMfy relay mil 
ran t.e irreui m an attWKbw ft 
Haturday aftal BOOSi 

The annual iraternlty itiiilatton 
quet* will bring the araw* %•• » • 
and will bi bald f Mlowai 

y T V at the i,i i *v II 

I'hi tfigoia Kappa al Ike 1 •••■•• "i^'. 

Kaii i«bjna»a i •- ■' • lw 

Kappa tiamma I'bi at the B**»* 1*" 

Inn. 
| _ .., ,i Phi £palb*a «' tbi 

Alpha f.amuia Itb- Hall 

gevrral ot Ike f« ' 
made .i.-i.-.. . 
mmnUtc MtMtram "t 



ti« ..I 



;ik« ■> 



NEW MEN IN SERVICE 

Roger F Bead 

. . . • I i 

T aviat ""i w • ' w bare ' 

,.l t lit we.-k« ioiu».-. 

Harold \ Poole e*-*lk * bo ha« 

,.,,,, . . riiiii>. f i • a* II -< 

t,,,. tatared 'to* garernaw t arw 

•i'hii'M ai * "f Bel i 

Donald II—- 1'*. to..rge Klchat 
John I» Mi..* ISand th.tiald 1 

'SB have all paiaed their •■■ ■ 

nation* and are now awailin;. 
to the training cam pa. 

Laroj i; Pi tenon tf I 
tht Bnv] and arbea la*i ! '- n 

N. w Votfc. 





j 



— 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 

published weekly, letters or extracts 

from letters from the Aggie men at the 

front.] 

Vladivostok, Siberia. 

We leave here Nov, IB for Tiflis. We 
were held up for a long time in Japan 
by orders not to proceed further until 
advised to by the Tiflis Consul. It took 
a long time to get word from him. How 
is the organic clasB, as bright as last 
year's? We plunge Into unknown coun- 
try from here. I doubt If our mall will 
reach the United States again for several 

months. 

Habby White '16. 
Editor's Notk— Mr.Wbite is doing Y. 
M. C. A. work in Russia and left for 
that country last summer. In the 
spring of 1916 he started for Turkey as 
an agricultural missionary finally arriv- 
ing In Petrograd at the time of the east- 
ern Russian Army's retreat, resulting In 
the Armenian massacres by the Turks 
among the very people with whom he 
was to work In Van, Asia Minor. He 
then returned to M. A. C. and look up 
graduate work In chemistry up to this 
spring. 



was in Lieut. Powell's company at Ayer 
for about two weeks, then I shipped to 
Governor's Island where we stayed for a 
week. Now I am in the casual Com- 
pany, Division 41. Quartermaster's Corps 
at Camp Merritt, N. J. This is the 
embarkation camp and from all appear- 
ances we will go abroad in a few days. 
We were equipped with full over-seas 
outfit at Governor's Island, but they 
called it in when we left, now It is being 
issued to us again. We won't have to 
go into the trencheB as we are clerks in 
the quartermasters corps and will be 
rated as sergeants when we got over, so 
that isn't so bad. 

I ran Into Darby while at Governor's 
Island. Gifford '18 and Lovejoy '15 are 
in my outfit. 

Since leaving Camp DevenB we have 
done almost nothing. We don't have to 
stand reveille or retreat, but worst of all 
we missed pay day. There was some 
talk of our being paid today. Unless 
we are paid soon, I guess we won't get 
any for a couple of months more. 
Believe me, a fellow Is sure out of luck 
if be is broke in the army although you 
wouldn't think it. 

(.1 KM I. M. (tIM.IOAN, 

overseas Casual Co., Q. M. ('. 
41nt Dlv.. Camp Merritt, N. J. 



25th Company 
Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

Am in the 20th Engineers Forestry 
unit and so far army life agrees » lth "•• 
very well. Expect to get my training 
at Washington, D. C. but just when 1 
leave here, no one knows. Met "Nubs" 
Mlanpied 'Mi here last night in the Y. 
M. 0. A. hut. There are several Aggie 
men here. 

Wm.R. Louse Ex-'IS, 

A Village le France, 
Dee. 14, 1917. 



"With the Colors," Dec. 14, 1917. 



of all the letters that I receive, the 
most cherished are the ones from my 
old college pals. The cenaorahlp 
doesn't allow me to say much, and 
furthermore there isn't so much to say. 
The iiiiirmaiy la still being run by the 
detachment, and In spite of the cold, 
wet weather, the per cent sick is very 
low and satisfactory to the doctors. All 
day long the troops are training, and 
we hear the sonnd of rifles, machine 
guns, .45'*. bombs, hand grenades, and 
artillery front morning to night. Prac- 
tice trenches are everywhere, and all 
kimlH of big and small maneuvers take 
is j. not it Utile time. When we do get 
at the II un in the next large offensive, 
Ood help him. Even If I am in the 
Hospital Corps, I Intend to knuckle to 
a lioche helmet. If yen want to see a 
sketch, imagine in your mind's eye 
"yours truly" rigged out In the regula- 
tion 0, l» uniform, roll puttees, trench 
boots, and English Iron helmet, a 
French gas mask, and carrying a Hist 
aid dressing poach, as well as a big 
knife in a leather srabhaid and a .45 at 
my aide. And when we move, all our 
blankets, toilet articles, and mesa kits 
bare to be carried on our backs, to yon 
can see it Is no easy life, Everyone has 
to do the same, and fresh U. S, troops, 
arriving every day in spite of the U* 
boat, fast get into the routine and awing 
of the training. 

Sunt. Fmbhio Schickkelhickoeh, 
San. Det, 102nd Machine Gun Rat., 
A. 1. F„ via New York. 



Every day la Sunday in the army. I 



A week ago Wednesday the Sprine- 
field Recruiting Station sent us to Ft. 
Warren to take the physical examina- 
tion. They put us into the 7tb Co. 0. 
A. C, which is stationed here. This is 
a mine company whose work is to lay 
the mines and to put the nets in the 
harbor here. I do not know how long 
we shall be here as we bear so many 
rumors, but I think we shall be here for 
some time. 

Now we are getting the fundamentals 

of the squad and company drills. We 

shall be kept at that work for some 

time before we gel any work on the 

guns. My training there at Aggie has 

hel ped me a great deal. Thus far the 

work baa been only a repetition of what 

we had there. I am sorry that I could 

not have stayed In college, but I believe 

that I have made the right stove in 

enlisting. 

Dkajik W. Sassobs, 

7th Co., Boston C. A. C, 

Ft. Warren, Mass. 



College Men 

are proverbially Critical Men— 
especially in the matter of Clothes 

Society ttranfc Glotbes 

Are the Preference of Thousands 
of the Student Body of America's 
Greatest Universities and Colleges 

Jordan Marsh Company is the favorite shopping place of 
thousands of college men in New England, undergraduates 
and alumni. 

Hence 

Isn't it quite right and logical that Society Brand Clothes 
should be carried in Boston by Jordan Marsh Company 
exclusively ? 



Purchases Delivered Free to Amherst 



Jordan Marsh Company 



II. b Rl*W*KU„ MfT„ 'IS 

e. m. BurrcM. i» 



R. B. COLLI KB. MS 
F. E COLE. *» 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



JOHN KENDRICK BANGS 

DELIGHTS WITH LECTURE 

Master; of humor, from wit and 
humor to appeal, and ability to portray 
Individual peculiarity, characterised 
the lecture of Mr, John Kendrlck 
Banff*! ffiven ia Howker Auditorium. 
last Saturday evening. Be certainly 
displayed 'bis power of absorbing the 
attention of bis audience, and bad their 
emotions completely at his will. 

Then was a serious as well as a hu- 
morous side to the lecture of this inter- 
nationally known humorist, who baa 
two son dose to the first line trenches. 
For this, bis latent of many visits to the 
campus, be chose (he topic of, "We, 
01 and Co, of the glorfona Arm, which 
wt *■ true Americans are memben," 
He touched upon many phases of 
Americanisms, hers colored with hi* 
Individualistic humor, there Inserting a 
bit of tie philosophy of life, or mayiw 
discoursing the qualities of one of the 
arts. During hi* delightful entertain- 
ment be expanded the iniersectional 
altitudes; culture, humor, and (he 
American youth's moraU, around all of 
which he wove numerous stories and 
Illustrations only as a man can who has 
travelled extensively over the country. 



iters, Athletic Suppliesand Drill Shoes 



jKWKI.I WS 

The £. £. Millett Estate 

A fall KM #f CoUess Jewelry *1***« in Mock 
Broken Lemwa replaced while rtra wall 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst. Mass. 

Ofle* Boats; t to u a. •.. l-« m • ». m. 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Main it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for sad no danger of Are 

Also a good Him of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



STUDENTS 

iwt.. re going home for the holidays 

DON'T FORGET 

to taks with yon to Bother, sister or 
sweetheart 



Flowers 



drown «a the f'ampoe. 

Dept. ot Floriculture 

TH«'j>tu>ne Ml 



DajttrlfilofiC 



The "Nonotuck" 

Holyokc s Leading Hotel 



RATES, $1.50 PEN MY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
—Proms— Our Specialty. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



INTERCLASS GAMES 

Baaketball Series to Start Friday 
Night. Five Teams to be 
Represented. 
The first games of the Interelass Bas- 
ketball schedule are to be played on 
Friday night at 8 o'clock when the 
seniors meet the sophomores aud t lie 
juniors play the freshmen. This year 
there are to be five teams instead of 
four as has been the custom heretofore. 
The unclassified studeuts are to have a 
quintet this year, thuB making live 
games for each of the class teams and 
four games for the unclassified men. 
The games are to be played on Friday 
nights at 8 o'clock in the Drill Hall. 
The schedule is as follows: 
Jan. 11, 1818 vs. l»2(i. 
1919 vs. 1921. 
Jan. 26, 1918 vs. unci. 
1919 vs. 1920. 
Feb. 8, 1918 vs. 1921. 

1919 vs. unci. 
Feb. 15, 1918 vs. 1920. 

1921 vs. unci. 
March 1. 1919 vs. 1921. 

1920 vs. unci. 
March 8, 1918 vs. 1919. 

1920 vs. 1921 . 
The following men have been elected 
as managers of their respective teams: 
William A. Foley for 191m, Moru.n II. 
Cassldy for 1919, John F. < atletoii for 
1940, Charles H. Anderson for 1921 and 
Ernest Hansen for the unclassified. 

ASSEMBLY SPEAKER 

Professor Ashley of M. A. 0. was the 
assembly speaker last Wediic»du\, 
■peaking on the beauty and historical 
associations of the Mediterranean coun- 
tries. Professor Ashley's pleUinMqM 
Interesting description touched upon 
Spanish customs and scenery, the quaint 
Moorish life of northern Africa, a land 
that stands as a relic offtbvfOM day: 
as well as Including lltmnesof ctdor from 
sunny Italy and historic Pompeii, The 
descriptions of Kgypl with its pyramid* 
and the Kile Valley, the Holy City, and 
Constantinople, were interesting by 
reason of their ancient historical asso- 
ciations. This lecture was the first of a 
series which Is Wing planned for the 
winter term, to be given bf various 
i si the faculty. 



i>aii.Y axi> srxi>AV 



Newspapers 

on the campus 

DaOy at Me Hats* IIaJI-*«B*w after rtap»l 
FARRINGTON *19 



PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD 

MAKES ANNUAL REPORT 

Reviews Work of the Year and An- 
nounces Plana and Needa. 
President Butterfield made his auuual 
report and recommendations to the gov- 
ernor and legislature of the state at Bos- 
ton last Tuesday, Jan. 4. He gave a 
brief review of the past year and pre- 
sented the plans and needs for tbis year. 
The college has been mobilized for 
war service, having sent 118 undergrad- 
uates including 24 commissioned officers 
into military branches and many of the 
faculty into food production and conser- 
vation, 35 acres of the farm being de- 
voted to emeryency food crops. A 
state-wide campaign has been conducted 
along the same lines. A branch of the 
l. 8. H. <)• T. ('. has been established at 
(he eollenc. Afield agent has worked 
to make the college known to the high 
schools for co-operation. Three terms 
have been substituted lor two in the 
j ear's work. Kelatious between the col- 
lege and the Stale Board of Agriculture 
have been agreed upon. 

The establishment of a department of 
horticultural manufactures iB recom- 
mended. 

The five-year appropriation tor the 
support Of the college will expire in 
N'ovcmliei and should be renewed in 
accordance with the recommendations 
..t i he special commission on the state of 
i he Milage of which L. Clark Seelye is 
chairman. 

The time has come when a separate 
Imilding should be provided for women 
students and a dean and two Instructors 
appelated to have charge of a separate 
depaitmcnt with an appropria te curric- 
ulum. 

Bequests for Immediate improvements 
total fHM,ft*fi Iml no new buildings are 
asked for this year. Attention was 
.ulled to the urgent need of another 
domiiiory, a new armory, a new chemi- 
cal laboratory, and a new lihary I In 
college has immediate need for the fol- 
lowing: |«»wer plant improvements. 
fM,109; dining ball im|.P<\emeiti», 
*IS,000; |Kiultry housing, »7,500; bulb 
cellar and potting shed for greenhouses, 
(fl.oufl; miscellaneous new equipment, 
$20,280: improvements and additions to 
the Lexington state market gardens, 
tSM.AOO. In addition, the experiment 
station needs *IU.0«o for additional land 
ami the college needs *n.U»w for a poultry 
farm. 



Come to us for 






Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



J 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



I 



r 



Scbillarc's Studio 

86 Aatn St.. 

■Rortbampton 




JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



PREPARE! 

I! 100 lbs. of Nitrate were put 
cm every acre of Wheat in 
United States, our Wheat Crop 
wouldbeincreasedmOOO.000 
bushels. 

Why not use 100 lbs. on yew 
i and help feed our armies? 



information on Wk*A 



P. J. iEHAN 



WILLIAM S. MYERS. 

Amm Hittt York 




COLLEGE WEATHER STATION 
HANGS UP NEW RECORD 

The H. A, C, experiment ■lathm 
weather observations, extending fn»ru 
[Ktfii to LWL7 and supplemented by those 
of the late I)r, Swell of AmfaenU college 
from iKM to i(W* show thai the month 
«f D ec e mber ww the coldest for this 
virility on record during the entire 
period of Si yean, The mean temper- 
ature vm 18,9 a» compared with ihm 
mum of the lMl as ye»m of m degree*. 
only twlee dnrlnjr this period hae ine 
ii-nnHTHtur- UriMi below §0 in ISWwheo 
ll was IB," and in 1*7* wflfc an average 
of 10 ,*». In addition, the pant mouth 
wa» the cul.itnf month on record during 
Ibe entire period wlih the txoeption of 
January, 1WM when the low mean ten* 
peraturr of H'A was reached. 

*1H. Krotu tln> land of (MMStMCMMi 
word from ;\ i-nupif iN old '1:1 men 
located «l l.<- M<" 't .*. V'" 1 ''* Mi'sici 
II. K. .hoif» in with the United Sugar 
Companies and Miller Jordan who hope* 
to gel into the army a* §o©b m fcta 
ranch ia in safe hand*. 



THIS IS JUST THE WEATHER FOR A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Ours are going fast but we still have some good ones. 

$6.50 to $24.00 

We have just received a new line of 

Reversible Custom Made Shirts 

that arc worth the one* over. 
Prices - $1.50 to $5.00 

Ita MM 60i to llil mtmmmrfm FmM Tfjpi 75c 

Suits and Overcoats from $12 to $25 








SAHDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaflncr & Marx Clothes 



1 



4 



1 i 

V 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



I 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published evt-ry Tuesday evening 
l . v th»> Student! of thi* Mannai-liu- 
Hetta Agricultural College. 

BOARD oF EDITORS. 

M Us^ll \ I.I, <> I.ANIMIKAR'lH.Eilltor-ln-Chlef 
w KB! I \ g. HAWA II: 'In. Msasgtag Edjtor 



ASHOl IATK KlHTOItB. 

At: mi i; N. iuiwks 19 
Ki.ior m. mi'i'i'M "19 

XKTIll It I.. ( HANIH.KK 18 

MYRTON F. EVANS MS 



Ii I SINKSS DIP A HTM EST. 

ItlluiKK R. KoXEiJI IOT'Ih, Uualneu Man»eer 
- \ Ml II. It li:i!i:iss 'ls». Assistant Manager 
i; m. ( v MritKI.I. '•-'(>, Advertl»ingMan«(ter 

I \ M I - i MA N.KS *20. Circulation 

II Ml lt.l» SMITH "JO. circulation 

Subscription $2,<K) per year. Single 
Bftnies, m (teats. Make all orders paya- 
l.h- to The Mass-ichus -tts Collegian. 

In i-i of change of address, sub- 
-. 1 1 1 .<■> - will please notify the business 
maiuiKer M kimmi as possible. 



i merei! •«•*<-.. rut -i-Um mstteratthe A inherit 
Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Jan. 8. No. 11 



Is 'iiue of peace prepare for war." 
lalnlv this truth can he applied re- 
\. i«.!v. al-o. In time of war prepare 
i.i pence. \inl wean told by tonne 
who know that I be seed bed for this 
preparation is I he college campus. 
Ili-rt« arc to be turned mil men who can 
ih ink clearly, talk convineinelv, men 
who will W forces In bringing to a stic- 
» . — in I termination this present war, 
ami in exerting, a controlling influence 
• •it the rrcoimi ruction period to follow. 
I. i nr* we liHUig ourselves In I be In'*! 

Banner i«i till these nboes? Sometimes 
ii 1* doubtful, t mr contersntion and 
attitude on things In general prove* 

|i i« certainly inn- that what men 
think almut they talk of. I groupof 
ttttaftteM men meeting by chance dis- 
,ii*fc, t,n a time at lea*t, eotiilltloiig in 
tin lm*irie*M world. .Several wlentisis 
lainioi ...me together without talking 
over new iavenilone. a-s peftne nli Ifcsf 

. hi I lag on of litem ion I hey are de- 
vi •>.. ping. These men talk of the things 
the\ are mini interested and eoncerned 
in It woiiU' seem only natural, there- 
i-.ie.ihat wbMiRniuiuif college nn- 
ilfrgraduntpn get together their ronver- 
i. would drift, toice at least, tot 
,tu.ii«ioii ..I their n»ahir work or the 
priiii ij.le* involved In some of their 
t.otr-i'*, Matters which should surely 
...ii.ffti am) tritcrenl t hem. unless they 
h»%r forgiiilett the real purptwe whirh 

• utii i hem in college. Such talk is 
rarrli heard at Sggte, h.twever. It is 
nlwej* idle conversatiiin, swapping 
Usenenlag the had point of the 
other frlhiw. the poor? way In which 
cullcge 1* run. etc. Of course, stieh talk 
ItHM Ms place a* a Means of relaxation 
from i-'ilfge work, But why not prac- 
I in moderation '.» The saying, 
"All work and ma play make Jack a 
dull bof," it viry frtie. But the phi- 
Itwitptt) of It works in the opposite dl» 
n-. mou also, fin* nil play and no work 
makes .lack a rent dull boy, 

I'tuTt- |« ahwolttiely 110 reason why a 
«,iinlcfi« should I»c mlinmpil to talk over 
■ im»Mi* i-oni-r-rtMiiE his college and life 

g, ^ ,-s ii is km here. If yon would 
have yoiir»elt immediately branded as a 
uftnii, an old tiian, or social failure, and 
,i, ...ii«- in be laiielleil as a cast off, inter- 
im.! Miine pomtnoti place talk with a 
lil.iiiwifoii of some piiuilple of eco- 
nomic*, etc. You will be assailed by a 



"cut the book stuff." "'we get enough 
of that in class," or "no deep stuff, 
please," from a dozen voices. In other 
words, don't disturb our peaceful con- 
versation for we detest to think. 

These conditions are not true in all 
other colleges. In some places it is not 
uncommon to hear a group of under- 
graduates discussing subjects relative 
to the lugger things of life, science, 
business, current events, as well as in- 
terests in Smith, story telling and big 
town talk. And these are the men who 
are going to get something when they 
graduate from college. 

Though it is a distasteful subject, it is 
nevertheless true to a certain extent 
ttiat Aggie men are unwilling to think 
enough for themselves, to work enough, 
take responsibility ami show initiative. 
Especially is this apt to be true among 
upperclasanien. We are college men in 
name but not in mind. The old gram- 
mar school idea that a teacher assigns 
lessons for his own pleasure and the dis- 
comfort of the student still prevails 
after eight yean. We have not \et 
grasped the significance of the fact that 
a professor who assigns more work than 
his men can do is far better than he 
who gives them so little that they lose 
interest In the course. We still persist 
in arranging a schedule of all the easy 
courses in the curriculum, instead of 
electing those from which we get a 
maximum of value. In other words, 
we have gone to the very verge of grail 
nation from college with the attitude 
held in grammar and high school. 
What chance will there be of changing 
this whan we get uut into the world 
where we will be expected to elect the 
hardest eouraes and not kick at an over- 
assignment of work',' Wc must bear in 
mind that our watchword this year is 
"scbularship." The needs of the time 
demand that we do onr utmost to live 
up to it, 

M. V C. MEN INVITED TO 

COMPETE AT DARTMOUTH 

The Dartmouth Outing Club is to 
bold its eighth Annual Winter Carni- 
val, at Hanover this winter, on Feb, 14, 
1ft and 10, and men of this college a u- 
invitcil to participate in the ski and 
snowshoe evenls, which will be open to 
men from all colleges and universities 
In the United States and Canada. Par* 

I ir u la l etiipha-'lH la to be put OB the 
oiitdiH.r events of this year's carnival, 
and these will include ski and snow- 
shoe dashes and obstacle races, a ski 
ennw-country race, and a ski-joring 
contest, (a addition there will be com- 
peletlve ski-jumping. Three prizes 
will be awarded In each of these events. 
.Social features will not be lacking at 
the festival. The tentative Indoor pro- 
gran comprises a play by the dramatic 
association, a concert by the musical 
cIuIm, an Intercollegiate basketball 
game and the annual carnival ball, 
While in Hanover, all outside com pell- 
ton will be lodged in the college dorm- 
itories free of charge. Entry blanks 
and further information concerning the 
winter sporta will lie gladly forwarded 
upon application to the club, 

VARSITY AT W.P. I„ SATURDAY 

On Saturday, Jan. IS, the Vanity 
basketball team will play W. I*. [. at 
Worcester in the Tech gymnasium. The 
game promises to be a dose one as (he 
Worcester men have an exceptionally 
fast team. The Aggie team will have 
advantage in having already played two 
games and a good game is expected. 

I. 1). I„tr>en. Manager, Kilanea Sugar 
Plantation (o., Klianta, Kauai, T, U, 



FOR A UNITED AGGIE 



I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the colle fee 
year of 1917-1918. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and anyihing else thatuould 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the peper weekly, unites de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will— will not send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates and comrades in service. 

Kindly return this blank to the Bnatneai Manager of the fiu.i.ii.i \ \. Am- 
herst, Mass., as soon as possible. 



The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. P. M. is mild, fragrant slow burning, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGUE 

THAT'S WHY IT'S PERFECT 




.' ></ i •• n 

4-m. (an 

g-oc. (an 

HH«. ran 



25 i .-Hi.. 
50 rents 

ID i «vith 
I- SO 



It is ABSOLUTELY 1MB 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PKODUCED 



Manufactured bv 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., BostOD, U.S.A. 




*»E" stands for everything 
men and boys wear, including 
onr rainproof * "Scotch Mist** 
overcoats. 

Prices moderate. 

*Mm&lgiHm4 Trademark. 

■ ah. nances rit i so 

Roobrs P««t Company 



Btuatfuay 
Ml*!* St. 

Htoadwaj 
at Warren 



"Tha 

Fear 

Cotaati" 

H%W YORK riTT 



oroeawar 
at Mtn St. 

Fifth A »«. 
at 41at At. 



THE DE LAVAL 
A WINNER! 

Why don't you let it 
win for you? 



The uranrl |'rl» - the hlirhMt pomible 
award wan «!vm the IJ« Ij»%nl at the pan- 
UN Cacifte Kxpmitna la iH£, as alwt at 
Hnffale. € btcago. St Mini*, I>ari*, BratMta. 
and all tfc» m*t »wM •spacttkifii for »ot» 
than » rent*. 

Ami at e**ry ninvention of ib# National 
Bntternwhm* Aatnvtettoa. butter md« 
ftMHMa nrj<i rated 
h» Pr I .aval Scbaratan 
haa aeiired hlKbenf — 
a U*« Ff«rt.rd. whlrh 

only BBtMoa! merit 
h;i« made fmwlbta 

T1W aunttriwrttj af 
In> l-n.il SeparaMra 
and of iin Laval pro- 

ilm I'd iieam la tHi 
tolijerniif**iliine<t. It 
la an ace»pt«< fart. 



THE OE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




W BaoAPWAT 

JflW VORK 



mr,. 



< RJCAAO 



Northa mpton Players 

"MRS. DANE'S DEFENCE" 



ANNUAL WINTER COURSE 
OPENS WITH 85 ATTENDING 



Russian Agricultural Agency Sends 

29 Men to Learn the Science 

of Farming. 

Tin- aatiuai winter shun emirse ot ten 
weeks o|n'lieil Dee. 'M with an eiiroll- 

meiit of W& ■tudanta, largely from Maa* 

saeliitsel ts. This tiullle is pi ii|mi1 titill- 
ate) V low as compared with the recent 

pan! years when I he millllier has been 
in the one hundreds. Tell id these stu- 
dents are seniors nt t he hint! h Ajjrieul- 

Hii.il school id' Northampton, There 
are twenty-tour elective course* uttered 
the Bioal popular lieinK, soil fertility, 
Held eiups, market gardening, fruit 
growing, feedlsjr, etc, A large number 
of the meiiii.ers are practical f»rm«ra 
ami thalr studies an- a reflect hm of this. 
\ teat tire, intei.-i ino as it ik aovel, is 
the presi-nee of W Kussiaiis itinoim ihe 
winter t-OUrae siudetils. These men 
llHTe lieeli sent hele l.\ the ilil'ee! lull of 

ihe itussiati ngricultural agency of the 

Ijussian supply enttimlttee whieh is 
seekinu to ha\e t h«n» stud> Ainelii-an 
aurieultuia: meilinds i hat they will 

be pn-|ialed to remedy the llilal e Ii 

tin lis in iheii native laud. Musi ot them 
arc farm mechanic* and have all re- 

ceHed uiiinl pllbli.s! |i,„il i-dtieatiull. A 

large proportion of them come from the 

lloosiek Fulls. S. V. Mflflo*, while Ihe 
lemaindei come from Mnssaehiisel ts, 
f oiiueelieiil , Illinois. Pennsylvania and 
Michigan. 



CHAPEL SPEAKER GIVES 

INTERESTING SERMON 

At las' Sunday'* chapel an extremely 
inspiring aermeu wan given liy ttahhl 

Louis Mann of llariford. « otin., on 
"Non-eompromtM, the IMHlosnphv id 
Life." He <»f an itiitliiicljlnjj, uou-eom- 
promlning attilmle toward the right la 
the hsMsin of all society and righteous- 
ness. *'ln individual .diameter*. In 
« .i i.al urmipa, mid In national deHHiii»s, 
Doa*enatproniisC is the necatisary and 
mm\ importanl factor, aaid Mr. Mann. 
The hauls of future pern ■•• must Em on 
an Rk'teeineiit lietwecn nations that un- 
comprotriisiiig right is the thing that 
makes and Insures peace,** 



A DRY CAMPUS 



RADIO CLASSES PROMISE 

TO BE SUCCESSFUL 

The recently organized radio buzzer 
signalling classes are heiiiK held every 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and 
Friday evenings from 6-80 to 7-d«> in t ho 
ptiysics building, The work is pro- 
graaalng exceedingly well under 

Professor Bobblna 1 well known ctlieient 
methods of organization and action. 
The work of the past week has been 
more or less of a preliminary nature and 
has consisted entirely of alphabet drill 
in the code by means of letter combina- 
tions sent a tew letters per minute. 
Each man is graded on his work and 
later on elimination and speed classes 
will take place but for the lime being 
receiving as a class will be the main 
consider a) ion. 

I'rolessor Rabbins went lo Itostoii last 
.Saturday for the purpose of obtaining 
the latest Information and visited the 
Harvard radio school. From what he 
could gather, the instruct ion now being 
offered bete is fully aa good as there 
except the handicap of equipment ami 

experience iu organization and man- 
auenieni. Prof easor Bobbins picked up 
a number id good points and will soon 
put them Into effect at the classes here. 

Th t aland lag feature ot the whole 

thing is no matter what branch a man 
intends to enlist im, experience in s'm- 
naliing will be a big help to him, even 
it he can take only four or live words 
a minute and this fact will count much 
later on. 

S. S. HYDE 

J»\vfU*r «»§»«! Opiiolrm 
M passant s- 1 

HeuUM*' t*re*f-ri|!tl«n» Ullid. Iln.k»n l.ernes 

v. . in.it.-l> Keldacpd, Hue Wiilrli IC«imlr- 

Ing l"r»H'i'tl>- mid skilfully iHiue, 

Atisfai'llim liuiuioiiffit. 

THE DINING HALL 

is offering moat attractive board 
to the student body. 

The get-together, songs and 
college life, and good times cen- 
ter about the dining hall. 

The calTeteria offers a-la-carte 
service. 



THE AIM 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best dressed 

men in your college : 

To keep out lines of youn» men's togs so utterly smart and distinctive. 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure 10 buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart "trench" overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, besi eosi made, 
Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



At the Young* Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, .... Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



This Week 



The grip of old Jack Front ha* been 
felt on the campus and the result i* «<tu« 
that haw ranaed much Inconvenience. 
The principal water main «f I'leaaani 
xlreet leading In the «-•»! lege L'ave up the 
ghost Ma mi rd ay niirhi and burit ju»t 
below the Kappa Sigma house deprlT- 
inir the catnpua of aaupply of water, 
The town water department ha* been 
endeavoring to loenta the leak by mean* 
id thawing nut iheur-tuud by Are and by 
drilling and Tuesday niuroingthe break 
waa repaired. Water wa« pwened fwai 
the otdlege brouk b>r genernl enllege 
jmrpoaeji and notice* calling attention 
to tbe necetuiary of boiling It when oaeii 
for drinking. Many wen- the dry 
i hroata and the buttled giKMi* bn*ine«s 
will pay additional dividend!! no dtmbt, 

nmm smoker Wednesday 

.liinior Smoker Wednesday night, the 
Pllh, .\ good prDgTBtn anil the BMnl 
good time in guaranteed liy the commit- 
tee, ?*onie Its portent bnslnene la to he 
traanaeted before ibe mnoker proper. 

SENIOR SMOKER 

there will be n -I'ulor »ninker at Drs- 
lier Hall Thursday evening »i ft-4fl t*. ». 

< iitii metier meiil elections will be held 
dot lag the euur»e of the evening. 



The main dining room serves 
monthly hoard. 



Drop in at 

"YE AGGIE INN" 

Meals, 

Candy, 

Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Oar .*i*-tt.ilt\ -AM otlirr ROf.d thin(!* to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STEKBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Maas. 

T«l. 4U-W 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner «»f tllll !■•:■ n ni'l I'.uihi Slt.rl-. thni 
him kK trulii the I iilmi I '■•|miI, i.« :i in.nl«-i n In* 
tclty rim mi llii- I- hihii in I'lun It t* jllM ;i utep 
rrntu MHinHtreet.Hwav frofll tin- noise iiml iliml. 
iiuit >el in llie relitrr nt tlif |nmiln*i>i' illnlilet. 

It* riHinm »« well furiilnlii'it 9 ml ofi.it nl.tf. 

lia\iiii! * ii-u-iiIhiim- iiml imt iinit 10I1I ranntag 
>\ it.i In i-ii.i) room, i'iti-r*$l mnl up; noma 

Willi l>atlii>«lmjle»SI.5ennil «U> 

It» tm-elli-iit riitnin.' iiml «ill M-iitilateit ilin 

Snu room nmkfii ii mi-iii i [ilcRMni m*morj 
#«\ i" viiiifiir.nr KM- iitytiest iinaitt> . «*-u cooked 
and tM-o'il ii' (M '"•*' WNP 9 pnaaner 

Biaj nt the Highland Hotel once »ttd ron win 
»titi<-M*Mi«' *ifi»iim Ifceia «yf»ln Mn*le awatf 

i'l ■•liltllC. 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hotel. SprtatfficIS, «•••• 



RAHAR'S INN 

v.. mi, a ii. i.i.. ii. MAeMekaawtti 

EUSOFEAN FLAM 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

37 Main Street, Masonir Building, 
Northani|Tton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Cfoscd only pom 1 A. M. 10 4 A. M, 





AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Nex I (11 ( ;ilil|iiiiu'H 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pena 

Agents for Hex Typewriter 

»-. M. CURRAN C. F. DYFR 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

m (IS AND CARPETS 

— K. Ii. MAKHII l<ilTATK — 



v « ■• . ■ 1 1 » » • ■ ■ I » 1 ' a 

Btrpiikn Lank FoLflEU, itne. 

MAMmerilMINll JKWKI.KRM 

IH4) ItWdAKWAY, NKW YOKK 

OLATB AM) <OI,I,K<»K 

I'INM AMI KIM.s j« 

<»i.i.i». hii.thk Awn NM-.wAir m urn 1 m 



Run 



Aggie Men 
By Aggie Men 



H. E. SPAULDING 19, Manager 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

.toblwni of VeaafjM Iron and Br«* Pit*, 
Valval eiMt FUtliw* f«r Ptearo. Water and 
llm*. Attemlm »nt\ Mutiimu HhIIm «nd Pipe 
i in Pttntf*. t'irit't Ml tonfcet^n, Mlllfiippllre 
Rnajtrteera end f'oatmrtoee f«ir fHeaffl and 
Hut W:it»-r Keallng, A h i < . h , , ( i i . ^initikler 
tenm. Mt.ittir and Miitirif i imin-i tlon«. 

Holy«ke, Meet. 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Qui< t and Comfortable — Every 
ftctlitv for 



DINNERS 



DR. GEO. A. H AS W ELI , 

< >siteopfitH 

78 Main St. 

V'Ull |lliill, -VI l l mm. 



JSnrnppan Plan 



Johnson Book Co. 

Agricultural Books 
-;- Filing Cases 1- 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi Moose 

Writing Paper 

With Class Nimerals Ml College Seals 

All kind* of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 



A. J. HASTINGS 




1 



\ 







■ 



• 



■ 



/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



EAT LESS meat, sugar and fat, and save for our army and allies 



liECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



'* HAM F» ♦» 



II 



I 



TOWN HALL 



r*. and 
tri.. 

10 and II 



Sat.. Jan. 12 



Than, and 
Fri., 

Jan.l7andl8 






1 I » i » Wet'lc ! 

Oouglaa Fairbanks in 

"Down to Earth' ■ 

Pathe New* ami Comedy on 
Thunday 

Pictograph and Comedy on 

Friday 

i:«*uiii Prloen 



Alice Joyce ml Harry Norey 

in 

"Whom the Gods Doitroy" 

•The Fidhtintf Trail" 
Path* Newt Bis V Comedy 

v :. ■ ^ i Week I 

Mary Plckiord in 

"Rebecca of Sunny - 

brook Farm" 

Pathe Newt and Comedy on 
Thursday 

Pictograph and Comedy on 
Friday 

Frlcea, wbli-h Include war tax 

Matinee* Fvening* 

A .lulu, I5e Fltwr. tec 
( hildren. 10c Bstcoftf. 2$c 

Marauerite ClarK in 

" Heleae of the North " 
"The FUatiaa TraU" 
Pathe New* - Bit V Comedy 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

Is richer in protein than most meats 
ami ih very much cheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 

Also try our fancy cheese: 



Neufchatel 
Olive 



Pimento 
Club 



All product! made from pasteur- 
ized milk and cream. 



Dairy Department 

Mass. Agricultural College. 

Dr. L. O. Whitman 

P Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Omce Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. in. Hunday tad 
other hours by appointment. 



There *re S*» e « » , >4 Ke4*oswliny you thould 
bay foui 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleas tnt Mreet 

WalK down imrn and create an appetite. 
Ilrrf In where rou rind the i»ie» mother makes. 

Good Service and Reasonable Prices 



School and College pnotograpDm . . 




LOCALLK.' S a Csnter St.. Northampton Mas*., 



JL Batchelder & Snyder Co. 




PACKERS *ND POULTRY URESSPRS 

WHOl.WAI.lt CJKI.V 

Beef, mutton, iamb. Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacou, 
Poultry, tiame. Butter, Cheese, 
BtSti Olive Oils. 



Blackstonc, north and Kuril! Centre Street*. 
BOSTON, .... flASS, 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Asa part of the pomology 53, Prof. 
Sears showed an interesting collection 
of stereopticon slides on the fruit dis- 
tricts of Nova Scotia, lasi Monday. 

With the opening of college after the 
Christmas holidays there were more 
than 70 men missing from the total 
number who enrolled in October, most 
of whom have gone into the service. 

Frederick C. Larson '17 has an- 
nounced his engagement to Miss An- 
nette Marie Fallgreii of Kverett. "Fred- 
die" has enlisted in the ordnance and 
expects to he in the personell located in 
Washington. 

Dr. I.indsey, of the chemistry depart- 
ment, testified at ■ hearing before the 
federal milk commission for New Eng- 
land St Boston, n»W last month. Ac- 
cording to formal surveys conducted 
by him, the fanner never received for 
milk a great deal above the cost of pro- 
duction. 

Prof, F, A. rushing Smith of the De- 
partment of Landscape Hardening, who 
lately left to join (he army has been 
ordered to the (.round Officers school, 
Aviation Heel ion, San Antonio, Texas. 
Mrs. Smith has returned to Amherst 
and is conducting classes in household 
economics at both Smith college and ML 

Hohoke. 

A meeting of the Hoys S,„nts was held 
after chapel na Friday, Jan. 4. for the 
purpose of organising a local troop at M. 
A.r. The fourteen sturdy scout* who 
were present voted to organize under 
the leadership of Professor Hart and the 
follow inn three ut their own number: 

LieroU *21, Mel len '»L and Alexander 
*il. They plan to have their lirst 
•'hike" mi Saturday, Jan. la. 

Associations with a Zeppelin raid for 
a moment came to the minds of many 
when a section of approximately 10 
square fee! of the ceiling in I he inner 
cafeteria dining room fell during the 
lunch hour Monday. Wit limit I he least 
warning It dropped upon a number of 
men eating at one of the lables bow* 
pletelj covering (hem and (heir food as 
well as the whole (able with B large 
quantity of piaster. Happily, there 
was no damage done ol her than a slight 
sealn wound wUtbTed by Fatteiif 'IV, but 
many were the dazed ami dusts beads. 
The qttoslloa now is— just what caused 
the falling to pari company? 



VARSITY RELAY 

The prospects of a successful varsity 
relay quartet look exceedingly bright 
as far as material goes but whether 
they will gel much action is doubtful. 
Eleven men are putting in scheduled 
hours of practice on the board track 
and Coach Dickinson has hopes of build* 
lag a last combination around Captain 
Vesnir the only veteran. Most of the new 
men showed up well in last year's inter- 
class and interfraternity contests and 
should offer good material of varsity 
calibre. The men out are ; Yesair '19, 
Hatehelder '19. Newell "20, Dewing '20. 
Carleion '20, Parsons '19, L. Lyons '18, 
Pree '19, Hallet 21, Cascio, 21 and H. 
Lyons '20. 

Manager Mat n is running up 

■gainst all sorts of snags in arranging a 
schedule because of the war's inroads 
on all athletic contests. The only per- 
manent date is set for Feb. 2 when the 
baton carriers will line up against New 
Hampshire at the It. A. A.'s annual in- 
vitation handicap meet and relay car- 
nival at Mechanic's building. Meets 
are pending with Williams and Trinity 
and probably the team wil 1 run at the 
Coast Artillery games if they are held. 
There is an opportunity offered for 
freshmen to compete for assistant man- 
ager of track and all interested see 

Mattoon. 




11, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Nat Go. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



KM-AHUHHBH KM-'- 



v3Z£~ EMPIRE "SRi - 



MOUNT H0LV0KK F1BE 

Mount H.dyoke college was visited 
by lire Dec. M reinlUng In the total loss 
of SVilliston Hail, with an enormous 
hiss In library, lecture room , and labo- 
ratory equipment , The building, one 
of the oldest »n the campus was used 
do* the departments of physiology, 
botany and tool nay. The work la these 
sciences is now lieiug carried on In 
other buildings until a temporary one 
stoiy bulldioa 1» erected. Plans for a 



SUCCESSFUL CONCERT 

AT HADLEY FRIDAY 

The first concert of the M. A. C. musi- 
cal chilis was given last Friday night 
under the auspices of Hopkins Academy 
before a large audience in the town hall 
a i II ad ley. Manager M. F. Evans took 
43 men on the trip, of this number 
seventeen were of the mandolin club 
and the remainder of the glee club and 
orchestra. 

The popular medley, which was ar- 
ranged by coach Hatched and the song 
'*Tb«M Hones Snail lilsa Again," were 
applauded heartily. After the concert, 
dancing was enjoyed until 11-30 P. a. 
and a great many of the audience took 
advantage of enjoying some of the new 
hits by the college orchestra. The nest 
■ oii.ert of the combined clubs will be at 
Springfield Friday night. 

WINTER SCHOOL RECEPTION 
A reception to the members of the 
winter school was given by the faculty, 
last Friday night, In the Social Union 
rooms. The committee In charge was 
director Andrew L. Thomson and Pro- 
fessors F, C. fears and J. 0, McNutt . 
Dancing tad a general good time 
enjoyed. 



BASKETBALL VICTORY 

[fontlmied from page 1.1 



forM. A. C— McCarthy 6, Harrington 
I I trklmmi 1, Whittle I. Meals fort*. 



Carptrvter & Morehouse, 
PRINTERS, 



Sn t, Cook Place. 



Amherst. Maaa ' 



new (juarter million tire proof science A ' . - Lock wood 4, Goodrich 4. Uoabi 
building are being miwie and const met- j from fouls— McCarthy 1, Leekwoed 1, 



Ion will be begun as soon as f be neces- 
sary funds are available. In the uoan 
while other colleges are generously 
offerlBg the toaa of their laboratory 
equipment, iMKiks and material acres ■ 
ary for the remainder of i !•■-> <--tr. M. 
A, C, has offered the use of its labora- 
tories io the department* of the de- 
stroy ed building. 



i..H»irlck4, Free fries missed by M. A, 
r llarringloH 1, McCarthy 8; for C. 
I . i .— Goodrich 1. Fouls for M. A. 0,— 
Harrington R, Parkhnrst 4, Whittle 6, 
McCarthy 2, Leaf S. Fouls for c. A. ft 
— Luekwpod 8, Moore 8, Moodrlcb 1, 
PreswHt •. Time 20 minute halves. 
Meferee— Bwaihrld of Browa, 
Dickinson of M. A, C. 



POOD IS FUJlLLr— Don't waste it 



United States Food 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 
Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
•'dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 




MERRITT CLARK & CO., 



141 Main Street, 
Northampton. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, Lincoln arid Kingston Sts . 
BOSTON, fTASS. 



Only two blocks from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and eaaily reached from North Station 
by Elevated Hallway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and buainess centre, 
also to the theatres and places of lntereit. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service ttniarpasted. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Pnprietor Manager 



AGGIE MEN IN CAMP DEVENS 
OFFICERS TRAINING SCHOOL 

The list of the 524 men froniA'anip 
Devens selected lo attend the otliceis' 
training school at tba cantonment from 
Jan. ii to April 5, includes 33 college 
men from New England colleges, and of 
these S3, i* ate Aggie men. .Since these 
men were carefully selected by three of 
the liii>h caiiloiinieiil officers, and were 
rated in several particulars, such as 
mental alertness, value to t he set vice, 
and ability to command, the fact that 
27.2 per cent, of I he New Englaud col- 
lege men chosen, were from M. A. C. 
■peaks very well for the institution and 
its course of military instruction. The 
successful candidates will not be com- 
missioned Immediately upon completion 
of the course, but will be returned to 
their present ratings until faaeaaelea 
occur in the officers corps of the second 

division thai comes to lamp Devens. 
The Aggie men who have shown excep- 
tional soldierly ability, and are to doff 
the private- and non-coins uniforms for 
those id the embryo ollieeis are as 
follows: 

scrgt. lieoige H. Palmer 'lit, .Sergl. 
Herbert II. Baxter 1». .Sergl . Samuel F. 
Tuthill 17, Bergt, Frank M. Habbii e\- 
'1H, Sergl. Arthur K. Quiinby 'HL Bergt. 
Thomas .1. liasser *1H, Bergt. Walls V 
Thompson 'IB, Carp. B, \. tHisaew 'b'>. 
Sergt. Herman B, Nash "17, 



James W. Brine Co. 



M 



, 



286 Devonshire St. 



Boston 



Athletic and Sporting Goods 




Official Outfitters for M.A.G. Military Uniforms and Supplies 




Tennis Supplies 
Basketball 



Bathing Suits 
Hockey 



Camping Outfits 
Track 



Football 
Soccer 



COLONIAL INN 

Southern Cooking Popu- 
lar ! Well, I should 
say so ! ! 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



Short Course Students 



PLAZA 

Northampton. 

When the Beat 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 




1 ADAMS & 

The Rexall Store 



CO. 



Sodas 




NEW FRATERNITY PLEDGES 

At the second pledging date for fresh- 
men on Monday the following men 
pledged fraternities: 

y. t. v. 
Herman N. Desn, Oakham 

Kolwrt M. liould, Sbelburne 

Frederick Zereber, Jersey, City, N l 

I'll! SII.MA KAIMS 

Charles «. Mackintosh, I'eabody 

K \ I i- \ •■ VMM \ nil. 

Kirkland, Worcester 

raw* • hi. 
Charles II. Anderson, Medford 

ALPHA • \ vi v: v atio 
Philip L. Koblnmin, Jfew Bedford 
Waller A. Mamh, Holden 

UNCLASSIFIED GET-T0-GETHER 

A inint thirty were present at the Un- 
classified gei-togeiber in thesueial unban 
rooms Monday night, Jan. 7. A good 
program of speaking was followed by 
the usual **ea!«.' President Derry 
Stockbndge of Allsnta, Oa, Introdaoad 
ihe f.dh.wing speakers; rrederfek Mer- 
kle who spoke on the value of science 
in vocational training, Joshua Bindley, 
Karl Webber, Arthur Oerrish, John 
pastfMstf, Pauley Fo)i, and < larence 
Noble. The aoanaltMl who arranged 
ibis affair were Max Mattoon, W. 
Wright, and A. Berrtab. The ofbeers 
of the unelaasifled sreDerryBtoek bridge, 
pnaldent; A. t*errish, iTice-presldent ; 
W. Wright, secretary; B. Uteea, treas- 
nrer. 

AGGIE NIGHT AT HAH? 

An Aggie night has been sched- 
uled by Miss Parker's dancing class 
far the evening »f J»« » !• * fc « 
Maaonh Ball, Hattba»pto*. lids will 
br truly an M A. C, affa'r and music 
will h* furnished by the college orches- 
tra. Miss Parker. *»y« that she hft«« 
not been ablo to gat the girls t.» attend 
her dance* this year because of the 
■carcity in men. She Bfowiaes that a 
isrtre number of Smith gfrls and others 
will attend en the 28d a* 1 result of 
the announcement b» be wade at the 



THE "COLLEGIAN" 

contains theCollege News. 

The College Notices. 

Things that are meant 
especially for you. 

It contains the advertise- 
ments of the merchants 
that are popular with 
us and patronized by us. 

It has advertisements of 
things you need and 
ought to use. 



THE "COLLEGIAN" 

A Special Price is rU n b> the students of 
while you are here, thtco,,ege - 

It's a live wire news pub- 
5C a COPy lication. 



II 



Subscription 



It should 1* part of your 
life while here, and you 
will want it sent home 

S2.00 a year when you .«.«. 
mailed u wanu your support; 

your subscription. 



For sale at the Dining Hall every Wednesday 

night and Thursday. 



Taste some more of the college life by buying the new M. A. C. Song Book 
at the Treasurer's office. Prlct $1.00 ($i.»° po**P* id )- 



I, 




nevt dancing class 



The dancing will 



commence »l 



aed eoiilinue until II. 



Your Crops and Your Profits 

\.v*-i*.N t. .. i. .> for i»rl«»s»ss t»a* 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 Th# ■••!■«• rar»sr.'SU«sar«- far SI ilyYiar. 1917 

k& For Oir Crop Books. Wi Want Reliable Agents Ii Unoccupied Territory 






> • 



Aihtreaa Agonoy .%f ti •» »•««-•• 



THE COE-MORTIHER GOMPXNY 

#ttbsMkr» of ttaa Amsrlcan Aartrultqral CaaSBkal Ce, 



1 



1 



§1 CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 




. 



— 1 



8 



/ 



\ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. 



SCHEDULE OF 1NTER-FRATER- 
N1TY RELAY RACES 

All races start at 6-0(>, »-(!'•, ami 5-10 
o'clock iu order given licluw. 

Jan. 21 — Kappa Gamma Phi vs. Theta 
Chi. 

Sigma l'lii Kpsilon vs. Lambda 
Cbi Alpha. 

Alpha Sigma 1'hi vs. Alpha 
Gamma Klin. 

Jan. 25— Kappa Sigma vs. Alpha Gani- 
m a It In i. 

ii. T. V. vs. Phi Sigma Kappa. 
I.amhda Chi Alpha vs. Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 

Jan. 28— Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Kappa 
Gamma Phi. 

Theta Chi vs. Sigma Phi Kp- 
silon, 

<i. T. v. vs. Kappa Sigma. 

Fkii. 1 — Kappa Gamma Phi vs. Sigma 
Phi Kpsilon. 

Theta Chi vs. Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Lambda Chi Alpha vs. Alpha 
Gamma Kim. 

Fkii. 4— KappaSigma vs. Alpha Sigma 
Phi. 

Q. T. V. vs. I ainl-.la (hi Mpha. 
Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Alpha 
Gumma Etho, 

Fkii. 8 — Phi Sigma Kappa vs .Theta < hi. 

Kappa Sigma vs. Kappa flam. 
ma Phi. 

t^. T. V. va. Sigma Phi Kpsilon. 

Fkii. 11 — Kappa (.annua Phi vs. Lambda 
(hi Alpba. 

Theta Chi vs. Alpha Qaoroa 

Kho. 

"Mgraa Phi I ■ p-.il. .n vs. Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 

Fkii. 15— Kappa Sigma va. Sigma Phi 
Kpsilon. 

(/. T. V. vs. Alpha Sigma Phi. 
Phi Sigma Kappa va. I..uni..la 
Cbi Alpha. 

I i a. 1H— Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Sigma 
Phi Kpsilon. 

Kappa Sigma vs. Lambda (In 

Alpha. 
^. T. V. va. Kappa (.annua Phi. 

Fkh. 22— Kappa Gamma Phi vs. Alpha 
Sigma Pbi. 

The ta Cbi va. Lambda (hi 

Alpha. 
Sigma Phi Kpsilon vs. Alpha 

< - annua Kho. 

Ff.ii. IB-Kappa Sigma vs. Theta Cbi. 
Q.T. V.va. Alpba Gamma Bho, 
Phi Sigma Kappa va. Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 

Mah. 1— Kappa Gamma Phi va, Alpba 

(.annua Ph.. 

Phi Sigma Kappa va. Kappa 

Sigma. 
y. T. V. va, Theta Chi, 
Rli.ks. 

1. Th« prevailing roles governing re- 
lay race* will be observed, 

t, Any man sot on the varsity relay 
squad and bel ng a memln-r or pledge of 
a fraternity la eligible to ran on the 
team representing that fraternity, 

1, All teams muxi report to coach 
Dickinson with fmtr mm promptly at 
the lime specified. Any team falling to 
do mi will forfeit the race. 

4. Postponed races nnisi be run on 
the seat date of ached tiled races on 
which neither team haa a scheduled 
race. Postponed races will follow sched- 
uled races, the first at §-!• ami others 
following at 5-20, ft-UA, etc. In ease of 
both teams wishing to postpone a race, 
notice must he given to Mower '18 nut 
less than S4 hours Before the -« • bed u led 
time of the lace, .fraternities must 
hand name of manager to Mower *1S, by 
Jan. 1 4, 

*14,-H,lJ, Lores, on detached s^tvIm 
working at chemistry in the gas defense 
service of the sanitary corps— a dlvis- 
Ion of tl« medical corps. His head- 
quarters arc (orated at Astoria, I. I. and 
he haa the ranking of a sergeant. 



N. C. A. A. MEETING 

Prof. Curry S. Hicks attended the 
enliven. ions of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association, held iu New York 
City on Dec. 27 ami 88, At the meeting 

were discussed many athletic problems 

upon which the following resolutions 
were passed : 

Athletic spurts should be made sub- 
servient to the work of military prepa- 
ration. 

Intercollegiate schedules should be 
ai ranged for as long and as far as possi- 
ble as national and local conditions per- 
mit, and that all possible eiicovrage- 
meui should be given to intramural 
sports, with a view of promoting the 
participation of all si minus. 

Professional coaching sbuulil be done 
to the minimum. 

Training tables should be discouraged, 

I iuard auainst the lowering of eligi- 
bility standards during the present 
crisis. 

Colleges and secondary schools, as far 
as possible, should lake up military 
ride practice as a part of athletic 
training. 



M. A. C. FILLS NORWICH QUOTA 

Filly-nine M. A. (. men are now in 
training ai the third officers' training 
camp located at ("amp I'piou, Vaphank, 
L. 1. They were chosen from the total 
ol 87 who applied last December, ( >l 
this number Ho represent M, A. I t, 
qnota to the camp and 23 are of tbe 
quota of Norwich University which 
could not be filled. This addition to 
i he quota was authorized by tbe adju- 
tant general of the army . Hue to this, 
nearly all the men. alumni ami under- 
Utaduale who made application tor 
admission were admitted. 



HOME ECONOMIC CONTESTS 
the Nome Economics Department of 
the L\ tension ."service, co-o|teratiug 
with tbe Hampden County League, haa 
plans under way for the organization of 
their annual boys' and girls* home ...... 

Domic club contest, beginning Feb. 1 
and closing May 1. 



POMOLOGY CLUB NOTES 

A regular meeting of the Pomology 
Club was held in Wilder Hall on the 
evening of Dec. 20. H. It. llarlwell was 
elected secretary to fill the vacancy left 
by L. 1). Peterson, who left college. 
F. 1). Thomas 'lit was elected club bas- 
ketball manager, to prepare for tbe 
game with the "Free-traders." A 
basket of Mcintosh applet was passed 
around, and served the purpose of re- 
freshments, while Fagan, oi the depart* 
luent, spoke a few words, and articles 
from various uiagaz ; nes were read by 
Roberts '18, Faxon '1'.), Howe '1S», and 
Hanson unci. 



ANNUAL LIBRARY REPORT 

Charles It. Green, college librarian, 
has recently completed tbe seventh an- 
nual report of the college library for 
the year ending Nov. 30, 1**17. The ac- 
tivity of this department is shown in 
the following summary: days open, 
335; hours open each week for lending 
and reading, K7; total number of vol- 
umes 89,000, of which 314)2 were added 
this year tl. rough gifts and purchase: 
number of volumes lent for home use 

huih, exclusive of reserve shall books 

loaned out over night : newspapets and 

periodical* received, 574. 

TRUSTEE8 MEETING 

Governor McCall presided at the meet- 
ing of die board of trustee* of Massa- 
chusetts \gricultural college, last Fri- 
day, •Ian. 4, in the State House, Gov- 
ernor McCall, « ho is ;in e\-otiieio presi- 
dent of the board is the lirst Governor 
since Governor Long's administration to 
preside at the trustees meetings and 
take part iu them. 



*18,~ M, N. Goodwin, landscape an hi. 
ted, Pomona, N, C. supplied the sub- 
ject matter fur an attractive pamphlet 
giving practical Instructions for carrying 
out tbe intents of estate legislative act 
providing for the proper care of rural 
cemeteries. 



COLLEGIAH DIRECTORY 

Telephone 
Associate Alumni, C. A. Peters, Secretary— 4J4 \V 

joint Committee on Intereol, Athletics, I*. A ..NUL.iughlin, Secretary — 43»-R 



M, A, C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Alhlelk Association. 

Th« College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

InterehjuM Athletic Committee, 



C, S, Hicks, Treasurer— 403- M 

H. K, Robbing, Manager- res. 6»-W 

H L, Russell, President— 416 

C G, Mailoon, Manager— I33S \V 

K. B. Collins, Acting Manager — 8336 

j, A, Chapman, Manager— 8314 

F. H. Canb-tt, President— S338-W 

M. F. F.vans, Manager— 8347 

K. M. UutTum, Manager— 8338-W 

k. L, Boyd, President— 416 

H, L. Rtuaeil, President— 1 19 K 

(). (i. Pratt, Secretary— 8374 



Amherst Co - op. Laundry 




Hip.h-r.rade Collie VVorH 

Shirts, . .,- 10-ISc 

Collars, .... 2 I -2c 
tuff-. - 2 Mte 

Plain Wash, - per d.ta. 4Sc 

Same, rough dry. - per doe, 30c 

Dry CleaninR and Prpssint» 

Micam Pressing 40c, 8 salts for $1.00 
I try Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



All Wit* payable at fnltaae at«r« anrl p»rc#i» 
left iftere will receive iirumiit sttenttoii. 



G, K. Babiht r 1 7, Alpha Sigma Phi House , F. E. Coli^Jr.'so, College Store 



CIGARS 

CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amlier>t. Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAN 



CARS 



M. A C. for Hot yoke **so aid hourly 
until 1 i-je p. M, 

M . A C fur Amhrrai 6 », 6*4j, 7-20, j~$o. 
805 8 20, then 20 mm. and 35 imii. 
after the hour until ic-se p. M Other 
cars at 1 1-50 A M.. 3 50, 5 50, 750, 95©, 
10.30 p. M-, snd a la»i car at 1 i-*o P, m 

Amhef«>t for M. A, C. 6oj 630, then 
half-hourly unni Soo A. M, S 15, 0-15. 
then 1 j mm and JO min a't. r the hour 
untl 1 1 jo P. m. Other ca>« at ir-oo 
noon and 4 00, 6 00, « 00.10 co P. M, and 
a last car at 12 30 P. M. 

jl p acfal l €«n at Reasonable Wat** 



AMHERST I SUNDERLAND ST, RY. CO 



LABROVHZ 

Cleaning and 

DRESS SUITS FOR MIRE 
fimta* Kur nlnhmgi n«-fc <h Pr»i» m 

II AMITt ktSCCT 

The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

Krom Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the HathV-lds, put |he foot 
ol Sugar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famous BIij*)dy Brook battle ground 
to Old heerfieki, thence to Green- 
field, Turaera FalU and acroas the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta 
gue and Millers PaHa, 

00 Miles of TraKkagc - Modern 

1 quipment Train fHapatch- 
Injr System -Freight and E«- 

Sarvice owe entire line. 






, ta 




^ \ T^ 



4, 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXV1H. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, Januar y 15, 1918. 



No. 12 



BASKETBALL QUINTET GETS 
DECISION OVER WORCESTER 

Wins 34-24 in First Game Away from 

Home. McCarthy Cages 

24 Points. 



INFORMAL NEXT SATURDAY 
TO BE AT DRAPER HALL 

Conflict with Basketball Game De- 
cides Committee to Try Out a 
Different Floor. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Comoany 



Tin* M I. C baakatbatl lean ■<** i t n 
n'pu eanae away Iwho home bj ilefeatluit 
the Worceater Ptilytech qaiatet :;-i «<» n 

at \Vur*'»'<ii*r, Siitiinlav eveol*K< Java. '-■ 

Wifll tin- I'lillli'lfllri' ill Itt.i \ii Nil if." I»f 

bind Hm-iii M. a. V. « u"< <'Mil in iii<- 

rather slipper; il* »■ *i- aod i"i ■ lew "»' ,n - 
uii's liutl i Ih> IVeti ii-aiii on tltf inn 
t'aptaln afeCartby, aided b> Wblitla*s 
r-le»er naaaing, sln»t two pretty baaketa 

iliirlni* llif iirsl IWU niinuiHs, anil tdded 
anuilier pvtal tmm a tt»ul K«ul. Tbej 
contloued to inlil I., tiiis lead tor laa miit- 
ulM whlli- La»t ami I'ai k hurwt kept 
( aptalo Ku»liin*i'« tni'ii iriiui sioiihji 
inn a t»'w iHiinis. TbeaTeok started aa 
aatgieaalve laaan wofb wbiek tuoli \u^i< 
entirely b| siirpriaa ami left Ibeaeure 
in to li in f.iviH .if \V. P. I. \t tl»i" 
.iiiical puiiil Mil arihy Imiki- tbroagfa 
with inn* iif hin preiiy xlnitN ami \uk-n 
riiiiiiinifii in iiii- Iwad t<-ri in- real "t itu- 
same, feicasen |ilii>»«i ■ ->• •! hadseto- 
ti.il -aim' fur ff oiW B sUl Wltb l"tii 1iii*KhU 
to his erctln iluriiiu' tbbl half. Han nu 
tun made t*#<» «-lf>«-r ibots U>r M A, » , 
liuib teataa |iia>«*il ■ slower, ii*-«*> 
scrappy gataa i» Ibe a aeoa dl ban. iaeb 
■larted <>ul with a <)iii(-k pa as l n a fawn 
lujt wfit- Weak mi HhiMHiiia, many ulioic 
guini.' niiil, Etieaatta aod Btwugbtoo, 
however, i«»ib mn!«rte4 la toaaklafi 
away f«ir two l»a»k««n<. Imliviilnal wik 
and pcMir pawiim «ti»r,nu«nx«*<l tin- 
.ml half. Captain K tlwh nrr pla-red a 
kihmI gntnr> tbniOfbnal anil »a« ai ih«' 
, inter «il fwry play, Imi vaa riiiher 
weak .»n nhiH.iiiig. Wblttle baad« tbe 
prettleal abol <>f tbe evj-nitiK fmni nearly 

I k« renter ol 1 tie Hour. 

Tbbj »a»T»cb » lu-t «aa«loflhe *ea 
win, wbll« the \>£iiU> meii have been !■»• 
prtning etety riawe.eatba panferabiiot' 

lug of tbe Wuin-iiler tfaiii wan * 
what »*eti*able. The game was well 
refereed ami qniiB tree from the nmle- 
alrable peraoiial [vols, 
nummary : 

U. A, R »- '■ I 

MHartby, t apt. rf rf, Kaahner. «*apt. 

llilTitik'toii, If I(,S|oiii;lilon 

M bltth < ■ Brieaaon 

Park h « rat , m ra, M • .« i ., ru 

toot.Ig li. Mefaorey 

s...,r,. M A, ft 84. \V, l»= 1. f4 i«b- 

■ litniM.H, - Hlattrbard l-.r Ul.iiilf, 
l,..i hr-p for lliinniui..ii. H*|t« i"> l*»'"' 
Mitevle M MiMaliera, I,h.<-..iii !■>» M. 
latin*, am! U.-,n.> lot -■*'«"•*■ 
tiiml* tioiu iIiht V-« aribj 10_, I rh 

i, Wliilile H, llarthm OO I, KlwbtM I I, 

|'ii\i", liuali li" in ti • %l ' 

( arthj 4, Koabnef - •' "" " " " " 
— Mi< ir'hv 6, Kn-li'ii ? .* t..ii. • 

Kn-liiiii 2. "M.iiiuliinn £, l.iii-"""' -• 
l,in«'olri'j. l^iK-i. SieCaffrey. MeCitlby, 
Whittle, P.laii.hai.l Referee * '- 
j nno, in,,.! P. I r'arpenter. TJ»« 
— pJ-minute h«i**- 



CAMPUS BUII DINGS C1.0SFD 
TO AVERT COAL SHORTAGE 



Fuel Adrciniatrator Prcnisea Enough 
to Keop Othera Heated. Frater- 
nity Houses Burning Wood. 



The fourth Informal of the year will 
be held Baturdaj aftaronoa in draper 
Hall, riif rhanui- oi tbe aceae of ih* 
battle i- dw to ■ «»efllel with tbe 
basketball (tame scbednled tor ihe 
••vi-niiiu. ami tbe lai-i tbal tin* bleaeban 
srected In tbe Drill Hall eaanol be i< 
moved for tbe present, I taming will 
in- in tbeeaaf ami aoatbeaal wlaga td 
tbe ball. Sapper will be served la the 
baaqael ball MhA i» tke anotbweal 
win». Mu-ii- will be famished by the 
college orebeaAra, eonnpueed of Boyee at 

tbe piano, Wo.nl mi tin* waxaphoin-. 

Haloes tbe banjo, Barton Ibe »lolln •■« 
Crtwbi Ibe nap- Tbe Ural smith 
ebaperorae hi Mr-.. Uenr} >miiii ol Ifl 

c.iliimtiii*- Bfaaae. Otrbi sboaW i all do 
h«-r In i ween 4 ami u'i*Io« k Prlaaj at- 
U'liHMin. The Mounl Holyoke ihap 

,i..ih- la aflsa 8artradk*i Gtbaoa of rNarter 
I Hall. Tbe speelal lloaal Holyoke earl 
will leave crosswalk ai 1-14 Batvniay 
alteroooe Tbe pHee «•• HeMoft » ut l 
pr«>arams -?-.!■"' Tbe tlcketa Bay be 
obtained frowi Lanpbeoral tbe Kappa 

84-ftea lion-" , ami must In* purehased 
by Wednes.lay Rlgbt. Auyie men at 
eauip are e-perially laeHod. 



JUNIOR SMOKER AND CLASS 
MEETING WEDNESDAY NIGNT 

(liarmaii la** f I he junior »imiki*r 

annoiim •"■ an hih re-i iim ami import- 
ant program i«»r tbe i muk < i lo !i «- b«W ; 
tfediieedaj efaalag .lan, iu, ai « i*, u.\ 
1'inie will be a rlaas meet lag praeedlagl 
tbe pmar»Bi of the etealag aad aeery I 
mem bet id the ela«t is urjieii lo be pi* * 
enl. The Junior prom and the /»»/. i 
will I*** Ike aobjeete few dbmawaloa aod 
fiery <m r wfcn baa ik# latereal ■>! tbeea 
KtlvitkM at heart phoald make ii ■ 
p.. in! in I** t hare. 

K,i! lowing the meeting remark* bj 
the eapiaiiiii »»f the Stttletir leumu will 
lie in ..nier on the proapretN lor tbe SWa> 
Min in ilie line id "port * 
Ita-keil.all. < ai no \rtlnir MK'aftby, 
Hookey, • u l ■ M '» < hUholin, 
Prwek, l apf^in John Vewialr, 

!»r..fewM*r Pattenw.n ha» lieen aerured 

by tbe eiiiuniitee to give will of hi« 

veij popular rea*!!ng« frnm modera 

Aiinri.-an an! hoi*, 

in her. DO Ike I a*l PI*****, 

smenkea, ball, Ate, pie ■• "• •=". W l*P- 



The eoal nil nation at M.A.f. im not 
so alarm ina, •*•> tar as tbe eolloge kt ea*- 

eerneil. ns Batn pas talk would generally 
iiiilieate. The eollega has at present IMS 
haml at the power plant ami t lie eoal 
shells eiioiiuh lilaek iliamomb* lo keep 
tbe powei plant running uniil Ihe lir*l 
,,l February . Measures ha\e been al- 

read] taken to piuhMg tha longevity of 
Ihla supply. liowker Auditorium. 
Wilder Hall, Ibe Mtat be aa atlea build- 

iiiu.aml all but Ihe hasement lahota- 
ii. lies of ihe Mu'iol.iolog.v building ami 

ihe large iioiauy laboratory in t'lark 

Hall, as well as a nuniliei of rooiiiN and 
laboratories I* other buildings, have 

heeuetoeed '.. sa%e fuel. The elanHM 
ami MWemblfea formerly held in tbe»»e 

buHdiugeare bolag taken care of elae- 

whele on Ihe eainpils. 

M. AT. ha* a eoniraet which calls 
l,, i BQO ions of coal each month, Hur- 
iuy lle.eml.er only "iou l«M of coal were 
delivered at the coal yard, and so far 
Ihla month none baa appeared. How- 
ever i h.-re is little danger of M.A.<\ 

heiiig obliged lo elese Hi d -, ■• a 

in « SOpplj ol e..al has been promised 
In ihe Fuel AilminiHtr&t'mii. 

Ihe healing of the fraiernit y houses 
la.es a serinfli r*n nation a* re|Mirted 
el I nieeling Of tkO re present alles of 
Ibe college fraiemilies last .Ssiurda) 
eveninu lo disenns ihe problem, at the 
i,.«|in-i ol the \inhersl fuel committee, 
til the six houses, four are practically 
« it lo. ui a till »t fuel, lambda t'lii 
Mphti rS tinning stove enal with but a 
.mall quaaUtf OW hand; Alpha Hgma 
Phi reported a half tow, no Monday, 
capable »t lasting perhaps one day, 

with 14 men la the house; Theta '"hi 
nan » ti* .» shovelfuls which they are 
saving while l.urning wihmI; Q. T, \, 
is burning wood during the day and 
coal at Right; Alpha t.atiin.a Bbo has 

■ aoartet low of atoee eoal and some 
wood) Kappa Hlgma seems the boat sit- 
uated, as far a* supply ioea, for fbey 
have enough to carry thningh Ihe 
gC i,v . , .itiouiieal runnliig; I'hl 
MgWM Kappa stands or falls with the 
college supply, f«>r tbey receive 
"eauiied" heal from tbe power plant 
steam ptpf mains. The houses are al- 
(euiptiiijj to liurn wood as mm-h as i»os- 
slble, ami heat as small a portion of tbe 
h.. use as fMMiwilile. * 



RUSSELL /GAIN FLECTED 
PRESIDENT BY SENIORS 

1918 Chooses Officers. Commence- 
ment Committees Formed and 
Dates Announced. 



The election id permanent class ofri- 

een aod eeweaaaoasaewl committees 
featured Ike bawguel »nd smoker of the 

Senior class, in the banquet ro*>m at 
inaper Ball, last Thursday evening. 
The discussion of eomowocenHHit eier- 
cises result -d In ihe setting of definite 
dates These will begin Friday evening, 
April 24), with a dance, and conclude 
Monday With I "reglar ole banquet," 
Sunday the 9Stk will l>e the day of 
llaccalaureate exercises, and Monday 
morning will be devoted to class day 
performances, with the afternoon given 
over to commencement ceremonies. 

Il i;m \M M Of f WOW 

President. How aid U Itussell of Wor- 

■water, 
Vice-President, U..l»ert I, Bwfd of Lynn. 
Secretary l icasiini , Marshall <». t*en- 

phear oi Wimisoi, < min. 
Marshal, William Foley of Moneoe. 

<i. ass Da* On-naaa 

Ivy Orator, S s Smith. 
4'lass ttrator, II. I.. Kussell. 
(las, ode, M'nw K. K. Addtlon. 

pipe Orator, <». H. i'n»tt. 

Campus Orator, F, l*op|». 
Ha'chei niati.r, O ( Huberts, 

CoviMi'M ► urn CoMMiTritaa 

class Day 

C. T. Smith, Cbalrmao, 
M li Prail. 

William Foley. 



M, A. C, Off A, A. U. LIST 
The \s«<H-i a? Ion of American DoleOT- 

■ in « kas ttt'.'itih plueed Ibe ewlegw m 

■ .,,,.,!,., i h.r ,,f nil leges sod unu.i 

riii* action i** Ibe result ol an 

PsHgatiou *>t the eollege, and this] 

on of klgb grade academte work 

In saade. Tbe grwdoatea of tbe eollege 

sjeuow ieawraJlj ragardwd «- i|uaiiti*Nj 

for adiitissi.Hi to Ibe «t idnate scIhmiIs 
1 with Hie uitlversilles in Ihe A-socialioD, 



FKESHMEN ORGANIZE 
Flesh nan ilchaters are being otgaa- 
i/ed under protessor Patterann for pmli- 
:,i.ie init relasa debates, sixteen men 
are working for their class team and for 
the present are divided into » wo squads 
,,l stgbl men which are again divided 
into group* of four for practice i debat- 
ing. A trial elimination debate will 
noon tie held. 




How a an I*. Rtiawai.i. 

Program — Commencement and 
Dacca! aureate 

Roberts, Chairman, 

Howes, 

Lyons. 




I 



U 






|\ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



Banquet 
Mower, Chairman, 
Boyd, 
Hitter. 

Dance 

Sullivan, Chairman, 
Til ton, 
Chapman. 

Commencement Show 
Miss Uilliker, Chairman, 
Miss Additon, 
Emmerich. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will be 
publlBhed weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
front.] 

Winchester, England, Dec. 3, 1917. 

After a fairly exciting trip and seeing 
a little of the world I landed safely in 
England. We sighted one submarine 
and two of our ships fired on an object 
they thought to be a periscope and 
finally we put into a harbor where we 
remained two days waiting for the seas 
to be cleaned of mines and any subma- 
rines that night be prowling around. 
While in this harbor an English freighter 
that was in our fleet came in torpedoed 
in the stern and the next day another 
vessel came in disabled by a torpedo. 
Of course there were the usual num- 
ber of false alarms to liven the time in 
between. 

After arriving here we were taken 
aeroM the Island in trains. The cars 
are a great deal smaller than ours and 
are divided Into five compartments, 
each separated from the other by a wall. 
Eight men can crowd into each eon* 
part men t. 

We are near the outskirts of this city 
which is very historic. It was founded 
by the Romans and waa the Beat ot gov- 
eminent for a long time. King Arthur 
used to bold his court here. Winches- 
ter eat liedial is eery historic and I ex- 
pect to go into it the day after tomor- 
row. Tomorrow I expect to be in charge 
of the company, gfio men, on an eight 
mile hike. The country here Is great 
and the graas is m green as we hare ie 
June at home. 

Today I saw a large tractor plowing a 
nearby field and I began to think of 
"bid" Haskell's agronomy and his 
"anuud practice" of plowing in the fall. 
Vou sure would enjoy visiting this 
«*BBtry as it is very interesting and 
•piaint. The houses are rather low, all 
4jf a uniform sixe, now and then you ace 
a t hatched n*»f. The land in the north 
of Ireland Is very interesting aa It Is 
divided into sections by hedge* and In 
ft corner of the section Is ft tbatcheil 
cottage. 

Tuts afternoon while we were on a 
hike I Mf a number of men just back 
freer the trenches, who had been 
wounded and were recovering. I also 
eaw a number of German prisoner* 
which interested me very much. Of 
coure there are ft namber of other things 
that night interest yon that I'm not at 
liberty to write about, 

We only expect to br> here a couple of 
Oftys or so before leaving for Southamp- 
ton on our way across to France. We'll 
only be in Southampton for m tnr days. 

Written later, 

Yesterday they permitted u to go t„ 
I he town so of course I tort ad van tag* 
of the opportunity. I went to the Win- 
chester cathedral and I really can't 
attempt to describe II. Everything In 
it is at tenet five or six hundred years 
old. There were the old Roman and 



Norman works and architecture, the 
boxes containing the bodies of the old 
Saxon kings, bishops, etc. I also saw 
the chair in which Queen Mary was 
married to Philip of Spain. Then going 
to Winchester castle I saw King Arthur'^ 
round table with the names of the 24 
knights and the ruins where Cromwell 
had destroyed the castle. There were a 
number of things I saw, iu fact too nu- 
merous to mention, and when you real- 
ize that this all started and existed 
before America was discovered iu many 
instances, and in all of them, before the 
U. S. settled you really think you've 
seen something worth while. 

Meals are rather different than in the 
{' . S. and tea in the afternoon is getting 
to be very popular, about seven o'clock 
we have dinner. The conservation of 
food is carried out in every particle of 
food and the food question is very im- 
portant. At night the city is so dark 
in places that you can hardly recognize 
anyone as the lights are all darkened 
and what light there is is furnished 
from paraffin products. Everything is 
dark on account of the fear of Zeppelins, 
even the shades in the store windows 
are drawn to keep the light from shin- 
ing out. 

I've talked with quite a few English 
officers and they seem to think that we 
are going to save them from defeat. 
With Russia out of it and the Italian 
situation as it is, it sure is a long road' 
a head. Since arriving here we all have 
begun to realize how serious the situa- 
tion is and what a big task we have in 
trout of us. The people in the U.S. will 
not realize it for some lime to come, not 
till the first casualty appears. Seeing so 
many wounded, meeting so many from 
the front who have related some of 
their experiences, has brought it borne 
to us all the more than all the news- 
papers and magazine articles we read at 
in. me could do. We have yet to see the 

country most affected of all, Flame. 
We haven't left our first stopping place 
yet, but expect to atari any day. 

EiKtr. < tiAUi.KS A. Ekaskr, 
Co. D Iflmh Inf., A. E. F. France. 
Via New York, 



DRAPER LUNCH 



Northampton, Mass. 



Where all foods of the best 

quality are served at the 

minimum price 



Dec. 11, 1917. 

We hate eery little reading matter 
over here and I would like very much 
to have you send me some copies of the 
tot i koi as and of the Mqufh, if you can. 
I assure you that hardly any pre s e nt 
would lie more welcome, than some of 
the old Aggie papen. 

I'd like to tell you about all the things 
we see, do, and know over here, but 
probably I'll hare to put the story tell- 
ing off, until the time when nobody 
will believe me. Just now we are hav- 
ing details, in the morning. This it 
quite easy, as I usually manage to screw 
out. In the afternoon*, however, we 
have some pretty hard work. We pat 
on our masks, packs, steel helmets, belts 
ami rifles with our three pound field 
shoes. The company ascends the 
steepest bills in the vicinity (and that 
is saying something) at double time. 
Now that, is some exercise, In fact, 
when we are all dolled up we feel like 
some forest rangers pack-mule AM 
at the the same lime you guys are stab- 
bing about the drill yon get, cheer up, 
It is said that a good soldier crabs, any- 
way. Certainly It is sare to say that 
practically every American soldier does 
more than his share of crabbing. 

Private Cabi. M, Ukmsmwat *2t), 
Ool 104th U.S. Inf., 

Ex, Feree, via New York. 



WM. M. KIMBALL, Proprietor. 



H. L. 

Em, 



i:i «-) I I M«r„ 'IS 

vurruM. *ti 



R. B. rOLLINB. '19 

r. % roue, m 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know w! 

graduates want 



uiid 



Athletic Supplicsand Drill Shoes' 



The £. £. Millett Estate 



A fell Hue of «•«!!•«* Jewelry always fa stock 
StokM LcnsM tr plarrd while r»« watt 



Lincoln Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst. Mass. 

Hoars : • to 1Z ». bb„ 1 40 to f, p. m. 



STUDENTS 

Before going hone for the holidays 

DON'T FORaBT 

to take with yon to mother, slater or 
sweetheart 

A Box of Those Dainty 

Srwwe on tee eanpea, 

Dept. ol Floriculture 

Te!*pfcone .100 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and do danger of fire 

Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



"Nonotuck* 

Holyoke's Leading Hole! 



RATES, $1.50 PER MY AND UP 

Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Prows— Our Specialty. 



W. J. iEHAN 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



DARTMOUTH LOSES FAST 

CONTEST TO M. A. C. FIVE 

Clever Defensive Work Keeps Visit- 
or's Tally Down. Soore 28-17 
In a very fast game at the Armory, 
last Tuesday evening, .'an. 8, the 
speedy M. A. C. live defeated Dart- 
mouth 28 to 17. Harrington put Aggie 
in the lead in the lirst few minutes of 
play, with a pretty goal from under the 
basket, hut Dartmouth immediately 
went ahead on two free tries and two 
haskets from the floor. Massachusetts 
came hack, and the half ended with the 
score standing at H all. M. A. V. took 
the lead at the opening ol the second 
half, on two haskets from the floor by 
1'arkhuist, and thereafter the home live 
was ahead, increasing its lead toward 
the last of the ggttft. The game was 
replete with tine psssirork hy both 
teams, and the dribbling of the Dart- 
mouth forwards bordered on thespec- 
laciilar. The defensive work of the M. 
A.<\ hacks was of the highest order, 
and toward the last of the gftftM the 
<;reen had to resort to long ineffective 
siiots. The play of Park hurst and Mt- 
Carthy featured for If, A. <'., while 
Hutchinson excelled for Dartmouth. 
The score: 
M. A. C. 

McCarthy (rapt.). If 
Harrington, rf 
Hlanehard, c 
Parkhurst, rg 



NEW HAMPSHIRE QUINTET 
TO OPPOSE M. A. C. SATURDAY 



Come to us for- 



DUETMOl TH 

rg, Johnson 

l k r, llillikel 

<•, Hutchinson (eapt.) 

If, ttttgridgfl 



Lent.lR rf. Dean 

Seore-M. A. C. M, Dartmouth 17. 
Substitutions- M. A. C- Whit tie for 
Hlanehard: Dartmouth Sample for 
Mugridue. Moriartv for Sample, l.armon 
f»r Uilliker. Ilauser for Johnson, tioals 
iroin tloor — M«< arthy 5. Harrington |\ 
Whittle I, Park hurst t. BfttehlftSOa 2, 
It.-. in. MugtbU'e. Uilliker, Johnson. 
Uosls from free tries — McCarthy «, 
Dean 4, Hilliker. Referee— Swathe Id of 
Brown. TtflMI -Dickinson of M. A.< 
Time—*) minute halves, 

FRATERNITY BANQUETS 

The initiation UanuiieU of Theta »'hi 
sod Alpha Sigma Phi fraternities will 
be held ftt the Plymouth Inn, N'oTlb- 
ampton. OH Snlnn!a> . Jan. Hi, 

«16,— R, K. Taher is at the I'nlvernlfy 
of Ohio as Fftrm Manager for the Exten- 
sion Department. AddreM, Townaend 
Hall. 



In Drill Hall at 8 O'clock, P. M. De- 
feated by Springfield 
52-24. 

The varsity basketball team will 
square off with New Hampshire State in 
the fourth game of the season on the 
drill hall tlooi Saturday evening. The 
M, A. C. live has three victories to its 
credit while New Hampshire has played 
only one game, being defeated by the 
•troBfl Springfield Y. M. C A. team 62 
to 24. The defeat was due to gome ex- 
tent to the lack of practise. The upstate 
team has been handicapped hy lack of 
experienced material, as only oue man 
was available from last year's team. 
However, Coach Cuwell has rounded out 
a fast quintet and a close contest is ex- 
pee'ed. Captain ('ahalaue, who plays 
ritrlit forward, is a fast man and clever 
at connecting with the iron hoops, 
Anderson, who plays the pivot position, 
aud Davis, at left guard, are fast men 
and will bear watching in Saturday's 

gftBM, 

McCarthy and Harrington will start at 
forwards and much isexpected from this 
pair. Captain M- (arthy is high score 
man and can he counted on for bis usual 
Clever shooting. Parkhurst has played 
a consistent game on the defense, with a 
remarkable ability to follow the ball 
and cover the courts. 

The probable lineup will be: 
M. A. C. 

McCarthy, rf lg. Shuttleworth 

Harrington, it rg, Davis 

Whittle or Hlanehard, c 

c, Anderson or Craig 

|,,.,,t, If rf, Steele or f'ahalane 
Parkhurst, rf jtj Pntler 

R. P. I. AND M. A. C. TEAMS 

IN A SCORELESS TIE 

Ice Covered with Two Inches of Water 
Makes Good Playing Impossible. 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Timer Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



r~ 



Scbillare's Stu&io 

S6 /ISntti St., 

fl o r t b a m p t o n 




JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



I. I**KFITT r '•• ****** 

OROYSDALE HCN 

SOITH IIAM.KV. MASS, 

LrasrfW, Afternoon Teat, Dinner* 

ODOH TB15UT" TO KAT. 

HOW IS THE SOLE WITH YOU? 
Get Your Shoe* Tapped 

—AT— 

GINSBURG'i, Amity it. 
Work Bent* <1«n* SarnfMtU.n gmmM^ 

Advertising Rates 
May be bad on 
Application to the 
Advertising Manager 



A very IftftSsMMUeftaf water hockey 
wm ntftged on th«« rink of the lt«MiM<M>la«r 
Polytechnic Institute at TlDJ . S fttMWlft f 

afternoon, when the M, A. C. team and 
that representing K. 1*. t. «pla*hi«l 
through 24 iiiiniiti'H in a BSOftiftM I 1 '"- 
UeemiM" of the thaw and rain the night 
i„.|.>r»*, there mm sn Inch of wster on 
Um rink, and the gsJlnnf «winnnera 
bed no chanm to play hockey. The 

Aggie Nfs kept lb* P uek ln lbe 
Reotmelser half «»r the pond throughout 
the fSBM, bat m It would not Host, 
were uuable to pa«rj it through t he 
water feet enough to get II i« the cage, 
Th» defertirife work of the M. A. 0, 
tea» wee ol high order, and Faxon did 
not hsT« » tingle ■hot to atop, R«e» 
iwt up s apbMBiBg game In hie Ia*t sp- 
l.eaian.e for Aggie, and the material 
,. r,. in lues « good team, when a chance 
to get •otoe praetiee twines, 

The iuntBtary : 

M A ' R P- I- 

McCarthy. Sweeney, rw 

Iw, Barker, Johnson (capt.) 
Cblahnlm. (f epl.» r r, f ratie 

Ueddlng, ti c,(...,k 

l^ftvitt, (rafts, Iw rw, Wheeler, Smith 
CraftB.ftmlib.rp cp» Sweet 

Boi», p p. Armairon-» 

raiott, g K. Meguid 

Beore M \ » «>, ■ P ' H Iteleree* 

— Sweesej and Hymen, «."ai umpire* 
< olIlM, M. \. O.i a ,Ml Pook, K I'. I. 
1 Timers— tWetrinson, M. A, C, ftftfl Co- 
here R.P.I. Time- 1"J minute bftWss. 



THIS IS JUST THE WEATHER FOR A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Ours are going fast but we still have some good onea, 

$6.50 to $24.00 

We have just received a new line <>! 

Reversible Custom Made Shirts 

that are worth the once over. 

Prices - M.S0 to M.00 

New Neckwear 50c to $1.50 rUtftl SHrti all prices Freshman Toqies 75c 

Suits and Overcoats from $12 to $25 




*ltt. — Kalpb G KHbon.li now in Franc* 
with the Iflth regiment engineers, 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaflner & Marx Clothes 



V 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OP EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. LANPHEAR 'l8.Editor-tn-Chlsf 



ARBOCIATK EnlTOBB, 
ARTHUR N. BOW EN '19 

ELIOT M. BUrrUM '19 

ARTHUR L. (HANDLER '19 

MYRTON r. EVANS '19 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

HAMIKI, K. KKKRIHH '19, AMlHt&nt Manager 
(i. M. < AMIT.M.I.'J". AdvertlBlngMftn«Ber 

JAMES r. MAIM.K8 '20. ftrculatfon 

O. ALERKD SMITH '20. Circulation 



Subscription $2. (Hi per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered at •*<-.. n<t <■ lata matter at the 
Post Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tueiday, Jan. 15. No. 12 

Women— a Problem. 

The reforms of life ami history never 
make much agitation in developing 
their purposes but rather work in un- 
seen or mistaken fornix ;L«(-oming appar- 
ent gradually ami perhaps only after 
meeting and passing many obstacles. 
So it has been and still is In this col- 
lege life of ours. With ihe admission 
of women for college grade work 18 
years ago last fall, a new factor was 
introduced into the life and traditions 
of the Institution and rampus. Since 
then there has grown steadily a rnovs- 
n.rni of woman students to the college 
until today there are :»i In attendance 
for degree courses. As far as the college 
was concerned, there never »;»» any pro- 
hibition of women attending, for this is 
shown In the broad minded admhssion 
policy but there has been, and la today, 
some prejudice. 

The nan with a biased mind Is proof 
a mighty small individual capacity, 
especially In these days of education 
and, when it comes to applying ibis to 
the campus there are many who will and 
iIm- shoe s perfect fit especially In re- 
gards to this question. With some of 
the undergraduates, !...th old and new, 
the situation has been somewhat one 
sided, In the first place the college 
dreams of their youi h did not contain 
any such factor as the *o-<-alled "co-eds" 
and It hi apparent thai many ate still 
coin liming these fancies and air castle* 
of younger days. They never could 
■puie mm why a handful of ambitions 
young women should desire to enroll In 
■ college which they believe, tu be aim- 
ply for men and Ihe bubble «if delight- 
ful childhood reveries of eight or ten 
years ago was burst and they do not like 
it because the results do not coincide 
with past happy days. It seems that 
they forget that the privileges and ad- 
vantages offered at this state institution 
are not Med down by any policy of nrti- 
tlcal barriers. Another eause of unfav- 
orable judgment is that of apparent re- 
straint caused by the presence of afew 
or more women in classes. In certain 
courses many men feel that they arc not 
getting what thev should <oh of the lect- 
ure work due to sensitive and traditional 
feelings simply because of the presence 
of mere Individual. This, in a sense Is 
tree bnl fundamentally is it not after 
ail a question of individual broadmimi- 
ednese and chat;* i> i And If there hi 
not enough of both here, something la 



wrong. Such opposition t hen cannot be 
called serious to any extent whatsoever. 
The problem is here, however, ami 
some position must be maintained and 
justified. Women students are coming 
in increasing numbers each year, in 
spite of the lack of special encourage- 
ment or favor, and the time is oppor- 
tune for placing them upon ft different 
status, based on a new policy. The de- 
velopment of woman's interest in agri- 
culture is notable from many points of 
view, and this increasingly important 
ami reasonable demand cannot long be 
ueglecled. The war especially lias 
given rise to a broadened Held, dealing 
not only with the actual production of 
food but the importance and need of 
food thrift educators; metal service 
training in connection with country life 
problems can be better carried oul at 
such a college as this than anywhere 
else; but "in the last analysis wom- 
an's ttatus on the farm and the quality 
of the home life in Ihe country, are the 
determining factors of a permanent 
rural civilization," ami so women 
should be trained for rural home mak- 
ing in the same manner ami environ- 
ment that has been used to train men 
for farm making. 

it Is not a question of OO-educatloa. 
Moth men's ami women's colleges of 
the East have prided themselves M 
their segregation and are loath to 
change this policy ( In the other hand 

the stale colleges and universities of 

New England and the North have BNM* 
lii-ally always been BO educational with 
the except ion of M, A. <*. which is the 
only land grant college in this part of 
the country that has no special courses 
and provisions fur woiim-i students. 
Tboseof the college who have given the 
question careful thought "believe that 
the best policy for a college as we are 
would be to develop work for women 
combining in a measure the advantages 
of both these policies. We should have 
on the campus an affiliated institution 
whure women would be considerably 
segregated and would have (heir own 
teachers, buildings and social life, but 
at the same time no artificial barriers 
would exist with the prevailing of 
mixed classes whenever practical." 

The problem Is here. It's Issue cannot 
be dodged for the Intln.ii. .- i« far loo 
reaching to be played with. The pres- 
ent solution for the rumpus is to forget 
individual dislikes of the present con- 
ditions and pray that the powers to be 
may give us the material means of clear- 
ing up the obstacles in the path of what 
will he perhaps the big reform of the 
college. A. M. ». 



CAMPUS NOTES 

W. P. Riiliertson *» has passed bis 
aviation examination and Is now await- 
ing his call Into the servii e. 

The class of Ml has d i scussed the 
purchase of a cup for the class baby but 
no definite conclusion basbeen reached. 

Professor Oordon of the ««©iogy de- 
partment attended the scientific meet- 
ings «t Carnegie Institute, Pittsburg, 
recently. 

Rigid economy is now ihe watchword 
at the Dining Hall, and Miss Kennedy, 
the manager, insists that there be abso- 
lutely no waste. 

The pay for the R. O. T. V.. officers has 
been placed to the credit of Colonel Wil- 
son, and he is only waiting to get formal 
notice and a check book, on reel pi of 
which be will pay the men, 

Robert t*. Royd *I8 while playing on 
his class basketball team against the 
sophomores Pridav, collided with ('Imp- 
man and cut a gash over his right eye 
which required two stitches, 



FOR A. UNITED AGGIE 

I enclose two dollars, subscription price for the Collegian for the collf^e 
year of 1917-1018. In return, I expect to receive, through the paper, news 
from my classmates in service, campus news and at ytbirg else that would 
be of interest to me. I also expect to receive the paper weekly, unlets de- 
layed in the mails. I expect that it will be forwarded to my address 
wherever I am. 

My address is 



I will -will not send to the Collegian a letter suitable to be published 
word for word in the paper for my classmates arid ten rt-des in seivne. 

Kindly return this blank to the Business Manager of I be < <h.i.i i.ian, Am- 
herst, Mass , as soon as possible, 




The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. P. M. is mild, fragrant flow burning, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGUE 

THAT'S WHY IT'S PERFECT 



I I./.. I «Ol 

i or. i»n 
fan 

• .in 



2$ i fttt* 

Se i etit« 

ee i cut* 

SI.SO 



It IS \ I '.vi il 1 |l I \ | Ml 
I INRST MIXTUKK 
PKODUCEI) 



u.niur.o-tiocil !•> 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., Boston, USA. 




We aim ai ihe golden mean I 
Nothing old fogy ! Nothing 
extreme ! 

Suits! Overcoats ' 

Everything men and boys 
wear, including Sporting Good*. 



«»!!. OKI**** I 

RoOSKft PBRT COMPAIfT 



Mr 

■t I tun St. 

ffmdwBf 
st W«r#B 



"Tne 
font 



IfSW TOM CfTT 



Rrnadwar 
etftftaftf. 

rtnfc avs, 

at 4lit St. 



THE DE LAVAL 
AWINNER! 

Why don't you let it 
win for you? 



Tfc» tiranil Mm His lilghmt ftoaafhl* 
iwml-mi BUrn the !»«• Ijivat it trm l*»n- 
smii-ra. it,. nuin a tt lBl m |^», — >(to M 
tmrfaiii « la. ago. t*t 1 -uil», Pnrtn nrmmli. 
and all itiFMrwit wnrtd KirKMltfonifnrnnre 
t h» i> m j ra r» . 

A nd at niri rnn v#tii j«n of t he National 
mmwrnakpnT AMnrtatfnfl, batter made 

ftneseeaam — nam 

t»y I H> 1 * v a | a*. | « m t or • 
ha. »< i.rrd bJtrhent - 
• tMf r*< <»rd, Written 
«nlr msanal Merit 
taa made {Mwlbt* 

Tb# HI |W llmllj «•' 

|M> fjitat Neiaratnt* 
and of I to I a vai f»pt>- 
«w«a nasa to mo 
l"i<*Kf«iu«tl«m«J. ft 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




1* ttao/tiHrAV 
SMW YflftK 



W K. If it Manx St. 
I IFlrAHO 



Northa mpton Players 

sr»s "THE NEST EGG" 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



ruder the Inst met ion of Professor 
Hart, several men in the Aurieitltural 
Education department are preparing to 

give pabllfl lectures in the Extension 
Ssrvlcs lield in the near future. 

I'rofessor Hart is soon to publish ;i 
bulletin on "Teaching in Agriculture 

as a New and Attractive l-'ield for Teach- 
ar»," lllusirulioiiH for t his 1 nil let in will 
be from work carried on at the college. 

Cheater I. Chase ea-'19ol Slelrnee has 
successfully ple ad the neceseerj ex* 
anlnatfoai and baa enlisted as r priv- 

:ile, 1st class, in the Aviation Section ol 

ihcSiyual Ko listed Reserve Corps. He 
la awaiting a eall for training at present. 

For the students in Farm Mai hiners 

i in- Rural Engineering department has 
purchased i Met/, auto with complete 

electrical equipment. The Willys Over- 
land Company has loaned the depart- 
ment a Willys-Knight motor for instruc- 
tional purposes. 

IJv ihe orders of the Mate Fuel Ad 
uiinislrator, Janus .1 Morrow, the local 
fuel board ol Amherst have been In. 
mI i ucied toeloae all places ni amusemeei 

.il in p. If, and to ci inline liii-inc»s he- 
tWeea Ihe hour- of 9 \ M and ■*• r M 

rhese orders e/ere pal i" eflfeci Jan 14. 
Dean Uewtsiatbe eoairihntt* to the 

William?. Record ol two Miiiiinri* "in 
tribute to Maicom Gilford ex-'H the ihm 

William!, nmleruraduate to make the 

supreme sacrifice In the present great 
struggle for Liberty.'' tiitfoid was 
killed lant fall in aeth.n on the Freneh 
front 

The etam ->f IfifiO hid. i ■ t dtag 

dnciiU iftot chapel Friday ami voted 
to join in with the two upper eiasaes in 
running a dance to l»e held undei the 

joint auspiic- ot ihe three classes at 

tome future date. Tiny al-o \oied to 
• ntei ■ relay team in the iii'ch !;i— n lav 
I' V. Ileadlo Was elected track manager 

■a D. C DoMglmn. the former waaagei 
hw entered the aviation eorpe. 

William J. Sweeney T» pulled the 
llgarnent* of hi* I* ft arm playing right 
wing on the ho. kev team, l« "'»* l>«'n- 
HHolaer gantt* Saturday ami further 
severe«l them in a pr.o me game after- 
ward, tiiit arm i* lit such had condition 
that h« will brubahlv lie unable 10 uw 
it for scTcral weeks and will have to 
give up participation In hockey ami rifle 
team work for the repit of the acawni. 

DR. WELLINGTON ADDRESSES 
CHEM. CLUB WEDNESDAY 

Dr. Charles Wellington will aildrepm 
the fbeniUlry clnb of MwwBehu»eii» 
\grietiltural wjllege at it» weekly meet- 
lea Wednesday afternoon at |4Mi f« i -fltl. 
Ili« subject ihtmld beexecediitaly inirr 
eating Mince he l« to talk on "student 
Days in tiermany.** I«a»t week the 
elnb wan entertained by two of it- mam 
bore, (MBeeniiif the society have been 
elected as follows : Presidenl. Bobrrt P. 
f hipholm; vlee-preiideit, Alfred Cros- 
by; secretary »»d treaaurer, William 
Mil her. William Sweeney i* rhnirtrntn 
of the oommiiiee on •ajfarfnlMMMt, 
stud neu tntereated In joining tHt- 
society should make writ ten ; *pjdieatro« 
to the secretary; nnder.la«imen may 
jota but may bec«i»e only honorary 
meiulo-r*. MeetingK are held weekly 
In ihe Hbrajyof the cbemmm building, 
Wctlnesday affern«M»n at t4W, 

SUNDAY SPEAKER 

^V. John iiavnea Holmes of the 
t'bureh of the Meiwinb, New V«rk, will 
be the the chipal s pa nh et for fanday, 

J»B, ^). fjiv Bolmefl uceivw] the dc- 

grew of A. n and S. r l« ir..m Uarrafd 
and 1* a tnetul»er >»t the Phi Beta Kappa 
s^iety, 



SPEAKS ON GOVERNMENT 

RAILROAD OWNERSHIP 



THE AIM 



The second of I he Wednesday assem- 
bly series of talks by members of ihe 
faculty and othcrs.on the historical and 

political aspects ol the war, Wat glean 
last Wednesday by Prof . Gettel of Am- 
herst College. The discussion by Prof. 
(Jciicl. on the topic of '"I'he Hiiilroads 
and the liovei iiment ," was very in- 
structive and interesting, as the various 
periods of railroad history and its influ- 
ence on the nation as a public utility 
wcie clearly outlined. "At the pres 

cm time." Prof, Qettel slated, "the 
government has taken over the full 
control ol ihe railroads, with the ready 
■aaeul and desire ol im-sl of their heads, 
to -.peed up shipments ot mail and 

freight, and to increase their efficiency 

as a means of prosecuting the war 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best diesseci 
men in your college ; 

To keep <>m lines of young men's togs so utieily smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knosving that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience, 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart tt trench ** overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coal made, 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



APOLLO QUARTET 

In Old Chapel Friday Evening. Well 
Known tn Students 
The Apollo fjtiutct ..t Boston will 
present a concert In the old chapel as 

the next of the So. ial I'ni uleriain- 

tlient*. The .jiial'lel consist* ol fottl 
male voices and a leader, and ha* heeii 
well received in Iwo previous appear- 
ance* on tin* campus, one three y.at* 

ago and the other last Kebmary, while 

they liave al*o earned and maintained 
an eii\ ialdc reputation around BtMtoa. 
Admission will he by Social I'ni. iii 
ticket*. 

S. S. HYDE 

Jt- wi'U-e «»••«! Opiloliin 

l.t I'lr.minl * 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, ...» Amherat 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



"BIDE-A-WEE 



»» 



. i<iili*t» l*tr« > ill-' i"i.» I 
\, • umlfli Ki 
Ina ITni 



lUnkiii l,«ti.«-p 
\\ .'. h M<*t«tr- 

•'•tic 

. . ij 



THE DINING HALL 

i«s offering most Attractive boani 

tO tin* student body. 

The r/et-together, Songi and 

ctdlege life* and good times cen- 
ter ahotit the tlininy; hall. 

The caliVteri.i oflfefl a-la-carte 

service 

The in. iin dining room tcrvea 
monthly board. 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Out ->|.rci»lt»— And other &»>A thing* tn fit 

MRS. L. M, STIiBBINS, 

Middle Strret, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4IS-W 

The Highland Hotel 

mrner of HUliu-n itnri gimW atrwrtji. tin.-.- 
1,1... ks from ttl« I nli'ii iH-lKit, 1b» lllii.l.iii II.* 
uln nin«n the Kor.ii*»n Phin. It In Jn-t a «ti-|i 
fonii MiiinHtrrel.»wa> fi»"' Hi'' ti"i«i' uhI ilu*t. 
(iml >it in On- i I'titci lit Hie tiii'inewi rtlntrl. t. 

H» , , . ore well fiirntuhett xnd loinfiiiliil-i. 

having i i. i«|.hniif ..ml inn j>" <1 ''" 1,! runntn e 
»iHler in «»*«•!> riMHii. Krtecs »t sad up: IOMSM 
with lnithinlnKlri tl.$e nut ni' 

ll> r\i-rllent , n il «•■!!» ••iilllated itln 

bag tiM.in iiuil. I . pi. .-..m mfiniif) 

Hi hlflHul HiiMlltl . well cooked 
. d in tin* heirt |.i.i.»ltil.- uiniim ■ 
t \ir HhrbUlnt Hotel mifi- mid jf.m will 
uate •ta»lm! there •(■(» Mn.»li I 

D. H. Sievers, 

HUhJand Hotel, Spi4aa«*ld. Nats. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 



Next to Campion's 



JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Aamts tar Km Ti pwwrttnr 

F. M. CURRAN C. P. DYFR 



RAHARS INN 

NorthamMon. 

iomtiaii rLAn 




Drop in at 



"YE AGGIE INN" 



Meals. 

Candy, 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main Street, Masonu Iluilding. 
N'nrtlinmpton, Maia. 

Lunche s, Soda, Ice Cream 

Chi frfim 1 A, At. to 4 A. M. 

The Holyoke Valve C Hydrant to. 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RIMS AND CARPF.TS 

— m, d. MAiaiH mtATK. - 



HtKIMIKN liA.VK. Poi^>m. Isr. 

m * -« 1 r *< -1 » u 1 V«, JIHH II". 
IWO ItKiiAinv \V. NKW VllHK 

tir.i'ii .\ no i «>i.i.i «.i 

I'lNM AND HI>'«ie* a» 



Student Supplies 

Eun for Af fl© Men 

By A^le Men 



h. l muwm it, 



of WrvacM Irwi »nd Unm ilr*. 

VllfW IRA Hlt(I.B« f.-t »«r9«M. *ll«iWl 
liSM, A«h*«tn« Hint M »•»•• fl 1 ** 

1 ni».ftriK». t*tt* * ni 

Knitinerrt »ml • '«»tr*et«f« f<>i -" "" »i"l 

Hn( V»tw H*»Iln«. Awlws.it' e - 

Br*»ffn«. iWitiM bwI r,«itttH» * mo • 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facilitv for 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

t * em t t»o f>e 1 1 la 

78 Mala St. 
Niirtliiimptoiit m , , — — . 



Johnson Book Co. 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -- 



BANQUETS PARTY 

K» ro jie mi Plan 



BABBITT *18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

Writing Paper 

With Class Nimerals and CtHtgt Ssals 

All kinds of 

Loose-leaf Books and Fountain 



Feasants 



A . J. HASTINGS 




; s 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



These men advertise for a purpose, give them your trade. 



imCKMAN*S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

*• I I .X Al 1 * •• 



I 



OWN HALL 



Mary Pick fortl in 

"Rebecca of Sunny - 

brook I arm" 

Path* Newi ami Comedy mi 
Thursday 

Pictoc'raph and Comedy mi 
Friday 

rill'IH, which inrlu.le war tax 

Afternoon* kveninsi 
Ailtilts. I5c Floor, 20c 
( liil.lri-n. IOC ISalciinv. 25c 



rtday 
and 
Friday. 

Jan. 17 and l« 



Anniversary 
Weak 



Saturday. 
Jan. 19 



Thursday. 
Jan. 24 



Friday. 



Jan. 26 



Marguerite Clark in 

" Helcne of the North " 
"The Fighting Trail" 
Fathe WeeKy. Big V Comedy 

Next W«»«»l« ( 

George Beban In "A Road- 
fide Impresario" 
Path* Weekly. Bray Cartoon 

Pauline Frederick 

In "Sapho" 
Pictotraph 

Paramount Comedy 

Lillian Walker In 

"Indiscretion" 

"The Fighting Trail " 

Fathe Weekly.BUV Comedy 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

is richer in protein loan nwat msata 
and is very in ix' 1j cheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 

Also try <»ur fanry elwese: 

Neufchatel Pimento 

Olive Club 

All products ina<b- from pasteur- 
ize. I milk Mini cream. 

Dairy Department 

Mass. Aurictiltural College. 

Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

ufln m lliiuis : l-;>. Ts |>. m. tsundayand 
other hours liv appointment. 



Tbn* ire Srtfen ', < > \ <-*!<«» whin v>u should 



jay your 



COAL 



nr 



C. R ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Mrcet 

Wall, down tuwnand <-Nata an appetite. 
Here h where ytm find the pies mother in»ke«. 

tiood Service and Reasonable Prices 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: ** Center St.. Northampton Mass., 

Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS AND POl'LTRY DRKSSFKS 

Villi M.KHU.t ti\| \ 




Beef, Mutton, 1 amb.Wal. Pork, Hams, Bacon, San 
sages. Poultry, (lame. Butter, Cheese, 
I kk*. Olive Oils. 

Blaekiiioiie, North ami .North On I it Slwata, 
BOSTON, .... 1ASS. 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



KKTAKI.IHHKIi 1*4?. 



Mahers of 
Celebrated 



EMPIRE 



BOLTS and 

mm 



(arpftvter & Morehousf, 

PRINTER, 



Sn i. Cook Place 



Amri*»r<M, W««« 



INTERCLASS GAMES GO TO COMBINED MUSICAL CLUBS 
JUNIORS AND SOPHOMORES MAKE HIT AT SPRINGFIELD 



Seniors Lose One Sided Contest 24 

to 1. Freshmen take Small 

End of 21 to 12 Score. 

t tihl ami even divided the honors al I he 
tirst ol the annual interchips basketball 
unities at the Drill Hall Friday e\eiiinu, 
.Ian. 11, when I lie sophomores defeated 
I lie senior's hastily yatlo-red combina- 
tion in a eoineily sketeh lo the tune of 
>4 lo 1 and the juniors presented the 
lirnt year men with the small end of a 
21 to 12 score. 

The first name, ihat of seniors ami 
so|ilioUio;es was a one sided allair, due 
lo the Liood defensive work of the 1MB 
books, the Inability of the senioi- to 
oel the hall out Of their hamls ami try 
the passiim game, and their inability to 
find the basket. \\ hall time the score 

stood II toll. Ill the second period it 
seemed he a ease of liilillir Up the ■eoff 
ami il looked like a eomplele shuioiit 
for WIS iiniil Chnjoiiaii dropped one in 
on a free ll> lor his teams' lone tally 
toward the end of the perioil. 

Hall starred for 18W wit A 8 baal 
from the Moor, and Mnb-iiebl played a 
eiMislstenl aniue al left guard. The 
score I 

.'U. 101*. 

Hall, rf k. Lawtoa 

lira vet* h ra, Rofd 

I ay lor, e e. HoWes 

lierttmu. rtr 11, Kmtiiei oh 

l.itileiield, 1« ii. Chapman 

Men- -1MB, 14; UM*. 1. Ntii«llt»- 
lion, l'.c.'ti. Fuller tor l.rm*".; ISM, 
I,eoii;ii.| for I.iHinn. tiojils irom IliH.r 
—Ball fl, Tavlor it, Herman*. Fouls 
( hapman. Fouls missed IUII $, Her- 
man. fhapman, Kmriierieli, Heferee— 
Hieksoi M, \.r. Timer Hairloatyii 
ol M \.i\ lime l.*i niltiuie halves. 

The Junior-Freshman sin uif was fast 
on the whole, woiue good paawworL being 

uncovered by IhiIIi leauis at lime*. The 
junior . ns muked well, 

ami I hey H, iliiir hhii *;n iftir. 

lug 'he Hr»i few intitule., linker and 
Viekeri chalking up I point*. '!».. 
t|o..r if. ml* ami two puims from Irce tries 
feuisiete.l liy I he 1«>JI team before 
the half enile.l, with t he mHtTt 14 to II 
in r,in«r of IMJU. The frcsl.uieii team 
work was sMrru-whal improved In lite 
nd period, and the junior- were un 
able h« ntaferia'iv i i n am thell It 

Viekcrs' dodiiifig an lag feHltllrd 

for Hi|H, and A \ut*T played h juhmI ,le. 
ferrsive lime for the Hrjl lire. The 
scoff : 

l'»H», 1W1. 

VSekers, rf ]g, Alsrer 

Baker, If rg, C.«.k 

French, i- e, Ikiweu 

White, rh If. Suiter 

Williams, lh n. Kok«»kl 

S, or- 1011, fl{ liJal, 13 Miilmttlu- 
tioiis x;»l». *s«ii Ht-rlHiMl for linker, Tir- 
Tf] for Frenih, Bpa 

IWl, ItosolT ft.r Nil p. Bl i;.. 

■all, Howard for A (bit. C«*al» from 
lloor Vlekersli, Freheh l t Ba -i|(1l- 

erland, Williams, Kukoski ;; Ho Wen. 
Foul* Vb'kpm, Hitweii 2, Kokoskt, 
f.Mik. Fouls missed - V l«k er« fl,fi«,k 
7. II.. wen, Koko»kf 2. \u fer.-e lluks 
ol M \ r !.„„i llrin m: .ii -a \|. 
A. 1 . Time lf> ami W minute periods. 



Successful Concert Friday Evening 

Three Thousand Enjoy Dancing 

Glee Club Trio Well Received 

The Musical f'luhs eanie through Fri- 
day niuhi wit 1 1 a big concert and dance 
in the Springfield Auditorium. The 
audience which enjoyed the eoneerl 

numbered nearly 2imhi ami this number 

was increased aboul to oiMN) when danc- 
ing commenced. The fact that this was 

probably the lasl chance for a twelve 
o'clock dance for sometime to OOKM led 
many to come in I he hit ler pari of the 
evening whodid not arrive early enough 
to enjoy the concert. 

Tlii- concert was only the second one 
siiveii hy (lie clubs this year, hut was a 
bin success, and the mandolin clnb 

which has been coached by (latchell of 
Springfield ihis fall gave an especially 

e I account ot itself in the "Sunny 

!Soulh", an overture ending with I he 

'Mai Spangled banner." They also 

showed up well in the "Popular Medley" 
number which be^an v\ it h "\\ here Do 
Wi Ho From Here?" and brought in a 
number of other wartime favorites 
anione them. "Over There" and "Send 
Me \way With A Smile." 
The glee elnb under the leadership of 

Crowe, Tl> proved to be auttc a feature 

ol the evening when the] sang the song 

eat Bones Shall Bite again." a plan- 

iatiou sting eoneeining llie loss of the 

garden ol lEdenb* Adam ami Eva, The 
most popular song In |mi!hi of eattt for 
em-ores was the patrhuic pannly on 
" Then- s A l^uijj, I^mg Trail", eom- 
posid ami sung by the trio Crowe, Hast- 
lags, and Mower. The encores for i bit 
were The Stars and Stripe* Shall Wave 
Over Hermany" and the frank roafes- 
sioiii, of two fellows who went to a 
funeral "just fi.r the ri.i . 

Dancing followed the eon cert and all 
enjoyed themselves until ihe midnight 
bell announced a new •!;»> 



NEW LAB EQUIPMENT 
I'rof, B obbi ns ha* just installed a dl- 
reel eurrenl yenetator In the basement 
ol the phy.it* building, and BOW 
has a constant and certain supply of 
i*ary bo ibe clasiwii In elec- 
ta the past sttirage batteries 
I have been depended <m, and at flaw 
were mil capable of delivering all that 

(wan r< The new equipment 

consist* of a ime and a half horse power 
5*»0 r. |», m, F«oni»my engine driven 
from gaii obiatued from the ordinary 
illuminating mains, which in turn ts 
belted lo a generator delivering an aver- 
age of one-half hone power. 



ALUMNI DAT SPEAKERS 

The program of alumni day speaker* 
* being made up by ihe lo ad« of the 
various college departments, and will 
lie ami .unci d nev.1 week, together with 
ihe prnsri iih <>t events for iNith Friiiay 
and Satuniav. 



CORRECTION . 

In the lasl Imuc of the fin i m,i vji If 
was iio orreiily staled lhal Frederick I 

l.il-en *|7 a I'jed. Il should hi 

liiiii a man igi annoiiricement. 



II. II .i.'ld II Howe i« in Frmnre 
Tlh ihe -.'.".I h I nalneers, « «•. B, 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 
Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's g 
"dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO., tUtSST 




THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, LtBOola satl KlSSStoa Stx . 
BOSTON, HASS. 



Onlr two blinks from South leriniiial Sta- 
mm, and easily ruffled &taa N>>itti kMartoa 

lij Klevated Kallway. ami nno enif nt alike 

to the ureal rjstait saapssasl baslnsss ecattw, 

.(is,, to the theaties utel pl.e is of InMtSSt. 

European Plan $1.00 per Dai 
and Upwards 

1 aide alul -' > I' ' utisio (ia»»c(l. 

paaklst and sMUi seal apes »p#tlest1eii 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



VARSITY. HOCKEY SEVEN TO 
MEET WILLIAMS SATURDAY 



Purple HaB New but Fast Team. De- ' 
feated R. P. I. 14 to 0. 



James W. Brine Co. 

Boston 



COLONIAL INN 

Southern Cooking Popu- 
lar ! Well, I should 
say so ! ! 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus; 



The vanltv boekej team leaves Sat- 
urday morning far WlllUrantown loi 

the annual William-, contest. Thlswlll 

be the varsity '■ second gams of the sea* 
•on, baviag met Ii. P. I. iMl Saturday 
at Ttos . 

Itoih teama are composed largely ol 

new no ii, Williams having mil) two 

veterans In their lineup and M. A, C, 
having one. Captain Brown of the Berk- 
shire team baa ahoWH meat devslupe- 
mciit since last year, and Hegardf in also 
very good, being particularly fasl on thr 
i,-,.. Chisboiaa played a fasi gams foe 
Aggie iaal rear and i?. evea In better 

form ih;- teSSuU. lb>H- who was OB i he 
team last ycui and wlio played in the 
Kenaselavt game has left college to join 
the aviation oorpa, ' ullina ol \\ illlauis, 

who it oneol theil best men, will prob- 
ably not be in the Hut up on account ol 
Ineligibilitj . 

The Purple team haw al-o played It. 
P. I. this season Htid Won by the one 

tided -col.- ..I 14 to u. Unfavorable 
weatiiei coieiiuoiih laat Saturday wade 

real hockey Impossible tor either team. 
For tbll *• MsOB, no coiiiparihoii can be 

made between the playing ou the two 
teams. ihe puck *u kept in the 

victims ..I Ihe l.i h una! SOSl ©I the 

time, but no accura te shots could be 
obtained due tu the depth of the wafer. 

The M|U»d has had iiitiieult> in hold- 

iny ptai'tice thi« seaaou due to stofuij 

weather aud ]MM,r he. Altboilgb the 
rink h»« been *et up bu SMH lime. U 
ha-. Iieen im|.o^,il.le lo hold practice 
there, li Ii Wl tl*al good matertai lual 
hand innn .. iniild up a speedy 

team wilhC'blsbuIm aa a nucleus. 



Athletic and Sporting Goods 



^athlItTC 




Official Outfitters for M.A.C. Military Uniforms and Supplies 



Tennis Supplies 
Basketball 



Bathing Suits 
Hockey 



Camping Outfits 
Track 



Football 
Soccer 



THE DAVENPORT 



PLAZA 

Northampton, 

Where the Best 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are sbown. 



NEW NUB-SE AT INFIRMARY 

The coh.-. oiirmary i« ti«w in e barge 
of Mi« «> i.ile ol lb* Bos- 

ton «it > toe then ibe 

baa be. . ig aa a prtvaie aarse wHh 
the except bm of three years of X-ray 
work at the Ibwiion ( By lloapitai. 

The tiiliruiaiy U open to any II. \ 1 

man tor free treat mem from MO a. m . m 

i^O i«. m, anil ti ■ i' 

ii. it • ■ ben 

l,ea I .tinelit Wili be ^if«n 

..r lu the rase of an emergency the in- 
flrmarj' wii! be ogenud, Visltlag hours 

will be annoanefil !.« i t 



A homelike stopping place fur "Aggie men. 

A new, modem house with every cunvenience. 

AFTER-SUPPER PARTIES, BANQUETS, fcc. 
Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport, Pleasant St. 

Navy's Call for Binoculars, Spy- 
glasses, and Telescopes 
"The Eyes of the Navy" 

The N.ivs hi still in urgent need of binoculars, spy-glassei »nd 
telescopes. Ai bo stock is on hand in this country to meet the 
present etuer^tucy, it hat become ueceatary to appeal to the P a J^" 
otism «d pri%ate owners, to furnish "EYES FOR THE NAVY". 

All articles ihould be securely tagged giving the name and 
address of the donor, and forwarded by mail or express to the 
Honorable I m U. Rooaevelt, Aaaiatant Secretary of the 

N.i%y, can- of Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C, to that 
they may be acknowledged by him. 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. < 



COLLEGE ASKS FOR DEVEL- 
OPMENT OF WOMEN'S WORK 

Pre-Moei.t BUI 

wllh the pre ■■> 

for the d«T«k»pme«i of women « work 

at the eotleae. 

> tor *Tii.t««» b.r a ■ 
g anii «l>».(*«i for rnaiiiteflaiiee to 
n ait. I1*l«». The rii|li«H« ha» bunt 
Ir«offBi»d the neei "t j.r..*iilinn for 

wonwo, aa«i thta ;« «b«* Uw »W«rt*I 

■tep in thl« litreciioH, 



1 ,,-ki.— jww w 



Drags 

Cigars 
Candy 



POMOLOGY CLVB TO DEBA 

Ihur»ilai evening thp PoiaohMI d»» 
Wilt hob! » <b- h at e m tfc« qn**ti»n : 



iBSBaSSJBBBSBSBBBBSBBJSBSl 



■i 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

w i .«. lotlny f«»«* i*rlo^ai «»a» 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1857 T * # »«»•»«• *•"»"* ••■•*•»■ tt Statr Taan 1917 

Ask For Oir Crop Books. Wo Wait Reliiblt mm h Uiouo^ i Torrflon 



u 



r«»oI 



Aililres* J^MEmnrngr *f«art«aisTs»r 

THE GOE-MORTIMER COMPANY 



lTiriiiIt*"rii of tl1 



Ibp eoBUBHlBe ot 






- i ■ tort «*f itH- 

SI CHAMBERS STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 








POOD IS FUEL Don't waste it 



United States Food Administration. 



/ 






8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1918. 



REVISED COMPANY 

LISTS ANNOUNCED 



Promotions and Transfers in College 
Battalion Take Effect Tuesday 

Colon*] Wilson of tin- Military Depart- 
ment announces the following promo- 
tions, appointments, anil transfers to 
take effect Tuesday, Jan. 1"». The 
officeri? ami DOQ-oom missioned officers 
must wciir the insignia of their rank, 
which ean be obtained at the Command- 
ant's office. 

1st Sergt. Barton Co, C to 1st Lieut. Co. 
Sergt. V. I'. Callanan Co, A to 2nd Lieut. 

Co. A 
Corp. Baicbelor Co. I) to 1st Sergt. Co. 

A 
Corp. Chandler Co. A to Sergt, Co. A 
Corp. A. K. Bowen Co. A to Sergt. Co. A 
Corp. .Ionian Co. A to Sergt. Co. A 
1st Lieut. Foley Co. C to (apt. Co. 11 
2ml Lieut. Leonard Co B to 1st Lieut. 

Co. 15 
Sergt. Carpenter Co. B to 2ml Lieut. Do. 

B 
Sergt. Parke Co 1) to 1st Sergt. Co. H 
Corp. Tirrell Co. C to Sergt. Co. B 
Corp. Woodard Co. C to Sergt. Co. B 
Corp. Coder re Co. I) to Sergt. Co. B 
Corp. J. E. Callanan Co. I> t.. 1st Lieut. 

( 'o. C 
1st Sergt. Sullivan Co. 1). to 2nd Lieut. 

Co. < 
Sergt. W. A. Baker Co. c to 1st Sergt. 

Co. C 
Sergt. i'ratt Co. D. to Sergt. Co. 
Corp. Thomas ( o. 1) to Sergt , < <». ( ! 
Sergt. St rack Co. 1) to Sergt. Co. C 
Corp. Karri nt; ton Co. B to Co. C 
1st Lieut. I.amphear Co. 1) to (apt. Co. 

D 
Corp. Spaulding Co. D to 1st Lieut. Co 

I) 
Sergt. Sweeney Co. A. to 1st Sergt. Co. 

I) 
Corp. Hark hurst Co. B to Sergt. Co. D 
Sergt. Peck Co. C to Sergt. Co. I) 
Sergt. \V. II. BakerOo, C to Sergt. Co. D 
Corp. Chase Co. B to Corp. Co. A 
Corp. Stockvrell Co. C to Corp. Co. A 
Corp. Morton Co. I) to Corp, Co, A 
Prir. E. H. Taylor Co, I) to Corp. Co. 4 
Priv. I). A. Html Co. D to Corp. A 
Corp. .I.ikctnnn Co. D to Corp, Co, B 
< ..rp. Woodside Co. A to Corp. Oft. g 
Priv. Centre Co. 1) to Corp, Co. li 
Corp. Fancuf Co. C to Corp, Co. B 
Corp. Garde Co. B to Corp. Co. B 
Priv. Lotbrop Co. I) to Corp, Co, |t 
PriT, Simmons Co. D. to Corp. Co, B 
Corp. Vickera Co. A to Corp. Co. B. 
PriT. Shangbnesaey Co, I> to Corp. Co. C 
Priv. Clarrldge Co. C to Corp. Co. c 
Corp. Boyd Co. B. to Corp. Co. C 
Corp. Harrington Co. B, to CoTp, Co. 
Priv, Carleiuti Co. to Corp, Co. C 
Priv. Beauregard Co, ( to Corp, Co, D 
Priv. MacLeod Co. D to Corp. Co, » 
Priv, Cri mini n Co. C to Corp. Co. D 
Priv. Blaucbard Co. C to Corp. Co. I) 
Corp. Haslaa Go, C to Corp, Co. U 
Sent. Major V. A. Fogg to 1st Heat. 

and Adjutant, 



COLLEGE AND EXTENSION 

SERVICE EXHIBITIONS 

The college departments and aitaa- 
si»n service have been prominent and 
active in exhibition and educat ional 
Work at many of the large shows of the 
state, Ihwi week an exhibit was placed 
in the corn show at Won *,i. i , and Prof, 
(tHiei bad an excellent display pertnin- 
ing to bee keeping. This week Pn>f. 
I, ii u it of the poollry depart merit will 
bave charge of an educational and 
model poultry exhibit at the poultry 
s how at Boston, and A, L, Dean Is in 
charge of the hoy** and girls* poultry 
club exhibition*. 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Fudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



iVl. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amher>t, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Associate Alumni, C. A. rVlert, Seerelary— 434-W 

Joint Committee on Intcrcol. Athletics, F, A .McLaughlin, Secretary— 433- R 



M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association. 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle flub, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

H. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Interclass Athletic Committee. 



C. S, Hicks, Treasurer— 40J-M 

H. F, Robbina, Manager — res. 6a \V 

H. L, Russell, President— 416 

C. O. Mattoon, Manager— S338 W 

R, B, Collins, Acting Manager— 8336 

j. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 

F. H, Canlett, President— S33S -\\ 

M. F. Kvans, Manager -8347 

E. M, Ruffum. Manager— 833S-W 

R. L, Boyd, President— 416 

H. L. Russell, President— 1 19 R 

John Vesalr, Secretary— 8346 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT, 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAH 

CARS 

M, A. C, lor Holyoke 7 so and hourly 
until 11-10 p, M, 

M. A, C, for Amhemt 6 ae, 6-45, 7-ao, 7 50, 
8-0$, S-iO, then 20 mm, and 35 nun, 
after the hour until 10-20 f, m Other 
car* at 1 1.50 A. U„ 3 50, 5 50, 750, 9-50, 
10-50 P, M., and a Um ear at 1 1-20 p, m 

Anil rt st for M. A, C 605, 630. then 
half-hourly until Moo a. m,, 815, 9>t$, 
then 15 mm, and 30 mm aitrr the hour 
unld it 30 p. m. Other tat* st n«oo 
iinon and 4 00, 600, S 00,10 00 p. m. and 
a last car at u 30 p. M. 
it 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



rst Co-op. La 





High-Grade College WorK 

Shirt*, • 10-lSr 

r.,|l,„., . . . . 2I-2c 

I «ii., - S I-2c 

plum Wash, - • per do*. 4§€ 

Same, rough dry, per do*. 3©C 



Cleaning and Pressing 

ORESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Ticket System 
11 *mii\ tmtiT 



The Connecticut Valley 

t Railway 



Steam Pressing 40c, I «ult* fur fl.tf 
I h \ Cleaning and Prett lng, $\M a S11I1 



All hills rwrabla « rnlhw* Mora *nd iwrrrl* 
tflft there will recttire prompt sttentlott. 



G. K. Babbitt*!;, Alpha Si nj Phi House; F. E. Cole, J m.'io, College Store, 



From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfield*, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Woody Brook battle ground 
to OW Peerfkld, theme to ftreen- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains'* to I.alw Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Kalis. 

SO Mite* of Track*x« rio4era 

Ing System Freight and E>> 
preaa Service over entire line . 



Valley Street Railway 

COIBBUT 




MH 2 4 19m 



I 







AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 22, 1918. 



No. 13 



BASKETBALL TEAM MEETS 
FIRST DEFEAT OF YEAR 

New Hampshire Triumphs 24-22 in 
Close and Exciting Contest. An- 
derson and Whittle Star. 

The M. A. C. basketball train went 
floWH l'» It* iirsl <tete«4 i»t the season in 
a close and exceptionally >ant uaiui' 
with Ni'W llampsliiiv Matf. 24 tt> '22, 
Saturday BVaotBg in \ht Drill Hail. 
The oloaenen* ot score lella tlie atofy «»t 
the game In wh't-li tin' Maroiin ami 
WliiiH live m»de a, jdmky and i»i-ri*i«t- 
enl tiglit ayainM it ti-ain Hii|»eriur in 
lieiulit and weight and tin- ability to 
make the moat of free tries from the 
foul line, 

liotb teams got off to a »low start, 
Kew llam|>*iiirt' teortOf iirst on a free 
try by ('ohttlane, and folluwing tliis up 
With two bankets lr«.tn tin- llool, luMore 
Aggie eonneeled wiih the hiM.p, making 
the score •"» to n in favor ot npatate ttftfli, 
The play wu fa«l during the la«t ihi 
iiiiimtes .d ihe half, Willi Aggie having 
a *liu!ii e«ige on her op|»ni»Mil». Sew 
Hampshire »iait«-ii * * 11 with a rush in 
the m-couii patted, opi -niui: ii |> ■ k ■"•' ■ 
four pidnfs In the lir«t few niiniitew. 
I In- M. A. t'. Mbotji Iwgan to lind their 
maiU in I lie laiter part of the half and 
with live minutes to go I lie (.: 
State aggregation waa leading b> ■ 
margin ot mo- h»»ket. Though the ball 
waa in the New Hampshire half of the 
court In tb« la*l niiinnes«if the game, 
all efforts to He the wore were futile, 
• ml the Bine and White quintet was 
* in points ahead at t be end. The all 
.mid work of Anderson, and the dp- 
i ,si¥e playing of the hark* featured 
i4 i«rN*ew Hampshire State, while Whittle 
- CJ expelled for M. A. * 
The summary: 



COMPLETE PROGRAM FOR ALUMNI DAY 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25 
7-40 to 11-30 A. M.— Alumni Address Classes. 
1-40 to 5-30 P. M.— Alumni Address Classes. 
5-00 P. M— Interfraternity Relay Races. 
5-30 P. M.— Alumni Dinner in Draper Hall. 
7-30 P. M— Musical Club Concert in Old Chapel. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 

3-00 P. M.— Hockey, M. A. C. v«. Tufts. 
4-00 P. M.— Interclass Basketball Games. 
7-00 P. M.— Fraternity Initiation Banquets. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS TO 

BE URGED IN ASSEMBLY 



VARSITY WINS OVERTIME 
CONTEST FROM WILLIAMS 



PLANS FOR ANNUAL ALUMNI 
CELEBRATION COMPLETED 

Talks to Students Friday by Gradu- 
ates. Varsity Hockey and Inter- 
class Basketball Gaines. 

The arrangements have Ween com- 
pleted ami cviM vthing i« in rend'nicKs fol 
i he annual alumni ila.v next Friday, 
.Ian. IS Ttw principal to*4Bia* "i last 

year have heen kepi intact and Hie gen- 
eral hi heme araa to ioceaaattl that only 
one change lias heen made. Instead of 
having alumni lalks held al Kihediiled 
L laSS (IS only, the (.peiikelB will be 
ginuped aeeonling lo ilivldioni*. Tin 
iiirtin divinion» and temative m-hedule Is 
a-4 fidluwa; 



If 



Is 



X, B, tr4Ti 

Bailer, If 

Cshalane, (eapt.) rf 
Anderson. | 
Mhuttleworth, !g 
l^ifls, « 



M, A. C, 

rg, Psrkbuni! 

Ig, I.' at 

e. Whittle 

rf, Met art by 

If. tlnrri 



aoore-S. H. Stale «, M. A « 
Hubatltatlons M. A. V. I^»thr„p f.«r 
llarrlngion. tjual* from fl««»r Amler 
m4, Cahalaue. ItuM^r a. Mum lrw» r«h. 
I)avi». Whittle .. M< artby *. Harrlng 
ton. Parkhiir^f. iieals from fonl* 
TJaTti i, Cahalane, MeCarthj 4, K-.ui* 
mlaaad— Cahalan* 4, 1»«Ti» a. McCarthy 
I. Heferefl-f'arliHg id Mirliigiield V. 
M. t'. A, * '..l!r;c Timer H«»ld»« of 
M, A. < . Time *) nttnuia balvei, At 
lendancB— WO, 



Speakers to Explain the System aad 

Its AdvantHges. Student 

Committee Formed. 

M \Ksemhly Wednewlay a drive will 
ha started al M. \, < . i««r the I'. B. War 
bawias Stampa and Certlfleatca. Krnem 

Whitcomli and llait> Harlow of Am- 
hemt and TreaaaOM heniov id ihecid- 
lege will iiulline the principle* and ad- 
vania-i'- 1. 1 lata plan As proposed by 
I lie gn\ eminent, this «.\'.te>n i« for tfcoM 
who denite In liel|i 1 he counirv llnan- 
>, hut are unalile tii do it on a huge 
scale. Thrill .stamps may h* iM.nght at 
pwat uIBlus, hanks- and avtboiisad 
ageneies for an eaa>ta t a«d when alxtaea 

uf lhe«e are wciiniulated they can lie 
i-Mhsuged. plim a Htnall amount nunc 
t,» cover Interest, h>r a War Haviugpi 
Stamp, which on Jan. 1, 1W3 will ba M 
deemed by the government for rive did- 
Jan. Twenty War Having Mamp- maj 
he accumulated on a Wai ■*«!■■ ' <r!li 
cai»«» to the amount ol fH*t OB ••*• 'ii 
lilicate. 

It |« lelt.that Aggie men ean al leaat 
make a good showing with Tbtilt 
jMamjHi. which being of nmall dirwmlna- 
litin .an he ea»lly token ont, and will 
not healoavv hur.leii tinaii' ially . An 
iindergrailuate .■..miiiittee. repiescnting 
lie e!a<e*en mid 1 1 aiertut ii'*, Iijk baaa 
(..lined iii prtmiiiic the plan, and is made 
n|, «d the t.illowlng: 

l«*l* Bwwell, Pratt, C. T, Smith, 
chapman. Foley. 

1P1H \ \ Ibiwen, Hurt. Buffum. 
t handler, J. K, Callanan. 
1B«J— Caaaphall, K. V. Hmilh. 
il«l-I<wkwiKri. llalleit. 



Faat Game Featured try all round 

Team Work by both Sevens. 

Score 9-1. 

Overtime was neeeiwary for a final 

decision at WTtUtaaatowa last Samiday. 

the log end of a I to 1 MOTt going to 
the M. A. C. septet in a clone and hard 
fought game with Williams, The game 
»a» rough and hard, each team break- 
ing a half dozen Micks, each. The fln*t 
period wan !.eiil>'Ies«..ia<'h seven rii*hillg 
the pink hack and forth butclexci 

■stops pleventcd i«eiililig. Ill the Hccolld 
bstf Aggie drew lit*! Idood nine minute* 
atler play w hen l^avilt eariied I lie rub- 
her down the rink and in a mix tip 
lielore the Purple net, panned to Hed- 
ging who pushed II in liti i he tint tally. 
S| i iiitiiiiics latei Mills ot Williams 
evened things Up and the period ended 
one all. A live minute overtime period 
was agreed on nml iw<» minute- eft el 
ihe opening whistle ciiUhnim sneaked 
ne by Manning for the winning point. 
The I htec itiii. lining lliinutet. were lively 
ouex but without renull. The learn 
work ot the Massachusetts g eVW wan 
etevei all arnttml. each man plaviiig a 
line cunstntenl game, Faxon making 
sever*l line Stop*. William* put upa 
fine defensive game and played a paw- 
ing game of line calibre with Brown a 
prominent figure. Considering the lack 
of practice for the M, A . C team, the 
rletery speaks well of a well balanced 
combination. The lineups 



MEW FR1SHKAW OFFICERS 



The freshman 
log officer* on 

President. Wall) 

mouth; Cm • pi' 
of Heading; M 



iI>i«k elected ihe f< 



\1 



nnday am r chapel: 

|, Wliiitle of Wey- 
leftf, .lames W, Alger 

tarv, Mtas Sarah w. 



UoodatotM of Mptingfiebi i »»d treasurer. 
Jnslln McCarthy of Arlington. 



CLASS OAME8 SATURDAY 
The aecoijd or tbe series of clasn 
ganl e« will be piavd Saturday nfler- 
1M...11 at 4 !». M,, aa « l.ai.ne of Alumni 

Day, in the Dflll tttaU, tiattwd of Frl- 

iiiied. Manager f liBpman, 
% , has Ireen unablr i*» sign 
tipaearalt] game for this open date, 
and the ei»M. teams will feature the 
weekend when th* seniors meet the 
■MtaaaUad men. and the Juniors toss 
| op with the *ophomoraa. 



w A, r, 
Ka»<trt, g 
Hmith, p 
( rafts, i»p 
( hlsholm, r 
lied ding, e 
McCarthy, r 
ljeavitt, Iw 



Wf 1,1. CAMS, 

1, Manning 

p. Jsplnk 

cp, Bad ley 

r, Brown 

e, llegardt 

rw, Mills 

Iw, Collin* 



Uaals Redding, 9 inin.; Mills. 15 
min,-. ChishoIm.Smin.biVcrtimei, Hef- 
eree Hoyl of William«. Timekeeper — 
IMrklniMin of M, A.C. Tlaw-Wniin, 

haWss. 



•lfc.-Edward H. IkMlflsh la at Chilli- 
i.the. presiirnnbly doing work with the 
engineers. 



A. M, 

7-80— 11-S0. Horticulture, and Sural 
Social Seieaee 

P. M. 

1^1— 5-80. Agriculture and Humani- 
ties. 
I a<ti divi-ion will in* assigned to a 
large riMim where the program for the 
entire division will be run oft. Kach 
department will be allowed twoor three 

tpetketa. 

There will be no Ncheduled classes for 
Upper classmen, but it is expected lhat 
thai wiH aiiend time of the maj«r 
lalks hot t lie lower elates a»pecial 
■yttaiB of cuts Will be ill efTeel , and ihe 
men may go iii anv bjCttW* aiot receive 
credit for the class .1 deduled for lhat 
hour. 

All alumni are urged to DMtM back on 
that da\ and should imt miss the op- 
portunity of spending a holiday on ihe 
Aggie Caiupii» and renewing old ac- 
quaintances, 

\n ai tractive list of speakers has heen 

secured tor tlo v,»l lulls di* isi.nutl talks 
I be men secured Up to lui 
are as follows : 

IMIUOI HI! % 

W, K. rlark "10. manager fruit fi 
MiltoiiKin-l he-Hudson, S. V, 

A. Y. MellougMll 14, county agent 
Hampshire County. Northampton, 
Mass. 

It, li. Lull "HO, county agent, 

IU»V C. Cutting tw. Bfision. Maaa. 

SI I I VI I 

Irr.T. M, < ar|. „t.r. *«, Carnegie Nn- 

trllion LalHiriilor* 
trswald Ilehreud. It. Atlas Powder Co , 

lani;n|'ia. I'.-nn. 
Leslie If s..ri..ii, 14. Howker Fertillwr 

1 ,, , ii,»,i 1 ii iile wcirks, tt,mtoii Ma««. 

KI'HVt, »«»' I M, 'I ll-M'i, 

Harold 0. Hales, superintendent aphonia, 
.Smith Deerfield. Mm», 

Charles EL fiouid, *l»l. Hampshire C(»u« 
|1 Farm liiircsiu, Nortliaiiipton. 
Mass. 

L. K. Abbolt. *14, Farm Hureau, Iran- 
bury , C«mn. 

Hayniomi s. VtTetheffcwe, i". tea- lot >»t 
agriciilliire, print-ipal high *cln«d. 
Marlmrro, N. U. 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 



/ , 






i) 



Hani A. Koratrom, '16. assistant junior 
extension worker, Manchester, Nil. 

., AOHU'ULTUKK 

I'. M. Harwood, '75, Mass. Dairy Bureau, 
Slate House, Hoston, Mass. 

P. F. Whitmore, instructor in dairying 
short course, M. A. C. 

Bertram Tupper, '06, farm superintend- 
ent, Wauwinet farms, Newton, Mass. 

Dr. H. J. Wheeler, '83, formerly of K. I. 
experiment station, now with Amer- 
ican Agricultural Chemical Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

II. .1. Baker, '11, Conn. Agricultural 
College, director extension dept. 

V. S. Madison, '12, East Greenwood, K.l. 

D, J. Lewis, '15, superintendent Bay 
End farm, Buzzard's Bay, Mass. 

K. N. Hohiitd, '12, Quaker Oats Milling 
Co., extension service, Boston, Mass. 

tfeofffe Smith, '07, farmer. Barre, Mass, 



FRAT RACES GET STARTED 

The first races of the interfraternity 
relay schedule were run off Monday 
aticrnoou. Of the three races the one 
between Alpha Sigma Phi and Alpha 
(lamina Klio was the fastest and fur- 
nished considerable excitement. The 
lirsl rare was between Kappa Gamma 
Phi and Theta Chi, in which Callauan 
took a good lead wbleb was maintained 
by bis team throughout the race. In 
ihc second race Graves got a better 
Ki;irt than Crawford, this lead being 
kajM by Alpha Sigma Phi until Coderre 
a ml Gray both fell in the last lap 
when Gray recovered himself and won 
bf inches from Coderre. Lambda (.'hi 
Alpha won from Sigma Phi Epsilon in 
the third race. The teams weie made 
ii l> as follows: 

Kappa Gamina Phi. Theta Chi. 
Callanan, Brown, 

Grout, Tlrrrll, 

West, Holloway, 

M.-. i\r. Baker. 

i ni«, i-s. 

Alpha Gamma Rbo. Alpha Sigma Phi. 
Crawford, Grave*, 

Cooper, Sbaughnessy, 

Hurd, Sloan, 

Gray, < oderre. 

Time, 2-\H. 
I..HI.I..I., Chi Alpha. Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
II. Lyons, Quad land, 

Gal tuba. Beauregard, 

Leonard, (handler. 

Luce, Sweeney. 

Time. Ml. 

Friday afternoon at five o'clock the 
following fraternities will compete: 
Kappa Sigma vs. Alpha Gamma Rho, 
Q, T. V. v«, Phi Sigma Kappa, Lambda 
Chi Alpha vs. Alpha Sigma Phi. On 
Monday Phi Sigma Kappa meets Kappa 
Gamma Pbi, Theta Chi meets Sigma 
Phi Kpsllon and Q. T. T. stacks up 
against Kappa Sigma. 

M . A. C. OFFICERS WIN PRO- 
NOTION AT CAMP DEVENS 

Second Lieutenants William Seville. 
Jr., 17 of Waban and Frederick B. 
Sampson es-*I8 of Fall River have been 
promoted to Urst Heutenaotelea In the 
S04th infantry brigade and the Ifilst 
depot brigade respectively of the 701 h 
National Army division at Camp Dsvens 
These (rnfurtlpaa, together with yoo 
other officers are the result of merit dis- 
played la the training of the select It* 
forces and ware especially approved by 
the War department. 

'W— II. <i. Noble, at first an enlisted 
private at Camp Evans, then was trans- 
ferred to tie engineers and then, on ac- 
count of his agility or "something," 
has been sent to Texas, where be hi now 
learning to be an aviator. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Kdi tor's note: In this column will be 
published weekly, letters or extracts 
from letters from the Aggie men at the 
front.] 

With the Canadian Forces, 

Bosingstoke, Dec. 18, 1917. 

I have received six numbers of the 
Coi.i. Ki;i an through Nov. 20 and was 
almighty pleased. Davies certainly did 
have a treacherous death and the Ger- 
man officer got what he deserved. 

I have had a medical examination 
and was placed in category B HI. All 
soldiers are in a certain category of clas- 
sification. Fighters in France are all 
A I. B III is the lowest and is next to 
either a discharge or return to Canada. 
Members of B III are sent to Canada to 
do various kinds of military work there, 
perhaps to replace fit men for the front. 
I may get sent back to Canada or may 
be not. A man who gets in the habit of 
expecting things sometimes gets disap- 
pointed. I expected to be placed in 
category D I. D iB lower than B In the 
alphabet but D classification means a 
training extending from six weeks to 
six month to lit men for the firing line. 
I became better sooner than I expected 
t>o am well pleased. I may come back 
to Canada yet. I will get 12 days leave 
before returning to my depot at where 
I went when we first came to England 
over 15 months ago. 

When I am in London I am going to 
try aud arrange for my transfer into the 
I . S. army. I am a little bit damaged 
and they may refuse to take me, but I 
think they should be willing to take 
one of their citizens. If I am refused, 
there is a demand for men B category 
to take up typewriting and general 
Mtenography work in a military school 
to replace A men for active service in 
the army. 

I had some discomfort when I was 
wounded but It Is all over with and I 
think nothing of It, We have concerts 
ome a week at this hospital. One thing 
I dread about leaving Is that I leave a 
steam beated building to go Into wooden 
buta heated by two small stoves with a 
beating circle around them of about 6 ft. 
radius. There are more than enough 
fellows la a hut to Sll up that radius 
too. Also shaving outside with cold 
water. It makes me shiver to think 
about It. The baths are arranged so 
that water eaa easily ran oat and wind 
as easily some In. Hot water Is pro- 
vided but we must run some into a pas 
and poor it Into a small tank above our 
beads to run down on us through a lot 
of holes, an arrangement like the top 
of a watering pot — never mind, spring 
will be here. I always think bow lucky 
I am compared to the poor fellows In 
the trenches. The Germans must be 
beaten and we can stand a few discom- 
fort*. Many men have made the great 
■seriftee and we have no cause to 
complain. 

It Is Interesting to read the letters 
from the fellows la the army which 
were printed in the Com.roiah Some 
have made food and seem content, 
others not so well off are beginning to 
complain but that is as far it goes, and 
we think nothing of It after it is over. 

Faun Mathkr Ka**17. 

Editor's Note -It is with great pleas- 
ure that we print the above parts of 
Mather's letter for it had been supposed 
be had been killed, ft wax reported in 
ike Coli,koia31 of May 1, 1917 that be 
had been shot through the left long 
while on s scouting expedition gad had 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 




College Men 

are proverbially Critical Men— 
especially in the matter of Clothes 

Society 3Brant» (Llotbes 

Are the Preference of Thousands 
of the Student Body of America's 
Greatest Universities and Colleges 



Jordan Marsh Company is the favorite shopping place of 
thousands of college men in New England, undergraduates 
and alumni. 

Hence 

Isn't it quite right and logical that Society Brand Clothes 
should be carried in Boston by Jordan Marsh Company 
exclusively ? 

Purchases Delivered Free to Amherst 



Jordan Marsh Company 



H. L. RUSSELL, Mar., *!S 
B. M- HUrrUM. Mil 



K It COLLINS. 'It 
r. K COLK. fO 



M. A. C. STORE 



of North Dormitory 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 



athletic 



Drill Shoes 



JBWBLBHS 

The E. E. Millett "Estate 



A full Una ef Coll«ee Jnreby alwan In 
Broken Lenew r«plat*d wfcUa fee wait 

Amherst. Meet. 



£. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Btocfc, Amhr rM. M 8JB, 

oaetRserti t to is a. m.. !•» tn ft p. m. 



STUDENTS 

Before going home for the holiday* 

*o take with you to mother, ■later or 
■weetbeart 

A Box of Those Dainty Flowers 

Grown mm the < smpnu. 

Dept. ot Floriculture 

Telephone M 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of to 

Also a good line of 

STUKUT LAMPS AM APPLIANCES 



k FAY, Electricians 



The ^Nonotuck" 

Hoi yoke's Leading Hotel 



RATES, $1.50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Prows — Our Specialty. 



died in a hospital, but to use his expres- 
Bion be was "only damaged" and re- 
covered which Acccounls for his refer- 
ences to medical examination. 



Jan. 12, 1918. 

Don't expect me to write very often 
as we work like fiends from 6 a. m. to 
10 p. M. For instance, the other day it 
took me 14 hours to smoke two-thirds 
of a cigar, so you can see how much 
time we have to kill. It's squads right 
and squads If ft for an hour, then some 
physical exercise of the severest kind, 
followed by a bike, etc., morning, noun 
and night. 

The camp is full of Aggie men, but 
we never see each other. I met S'eve 
Richardson today, and he said 'hi," bul 
didn't have time to ask him how be 
felt. Stan Hall's company passed ours 
in drill the other day, but 1 only saw 
him through the corners of my eyes. 
Koiikbt C. Wkbtman, 1st Clans Private , 
3rd Officers Training School. 
Camp Upton, Ef. Y. 
8rd Company, 3rd Platoon. 



Y. M. C. A. DEPUTATION TEAM 
SCORES AT SUNDERLAND 

The Y. M. C. A. deputation team com- 
posed of It. T. Parkburst, leader, E. A, 
White, Harold Harrington, Carrol Bun- 
ker, Herman Oppe and Lee Burton, 
violinist, made a trip to Sunderland, 
Sunday Jan. 20. The team visited the 
First Congregational church in the 
morning. They had dinuer in the 
homes of the various church members 
and after dinner went for a hike to 
South Deerfleld. The rest of the after- 
noon was spent at the home of "Doc" 
Williams. The Aggie men took entire 
charge of the evening service from the 
music to thediBcussion of the subject of 
the evening. They spoke on the sub- 
ject "Being a Christian," likening the 
Christian life to a hard race, the train- 
ing, start and finish of the contest. The 
c Lurch was well filled and the men were 
extremely well received. After the 
meeting Mrs. Williams served a very 
delicious lunch. 



■Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Albany, N. Y. 
Jan. 19, 1M1H. 

Well. I have^gradualed from ground 
school at last. Start for Houston. 
Texas, Hying field next week Tuesday. 
Believe me! it is some relief to be 
through with ground achoool. 

Perhaps you beard that the Army 
aviation school at U. I. T. was din. ■on- 
tinned, and the men transferred either 
to Princeton, N. J. or Cornell, Ithaca, 
N. Y. I was sent to Cornell, It I" a 
much larger achool than Tech was. 
Harold Poole is in his second week at the 
Cornell achool. Write and let me know 
all about M A. C 

"Dai." Fakmar *1H. 



INTERCLASS RELAY RACES 

TO START NEXT MONTH 

The Inlerciaas relay acbedule baa 
beea completed. A feature this year 
will be the entry of Bnelasaltted team, 
airing each elaaa four teama to run 
against. There will be a total of eight 
races for escbeiaw. lot first four for a 
distance of two laps or MO yards, and 
the second few eeveflajr W0 yard or 
three laps. 

Tbeee races will be run prior to and 
count aa part of the annual Interclajw 
Indoor track meet, which will be held 
Saturday, March t. Por each dial am* 
thi pointa will be: first, l| second, S; 
third, 1; and these will be counted In 
the toterelass totals. Any man not bar- 
ing a earslty track letter Is eligible to 



PROMINENT ALUMNUS WINS 

MAJOR'S COMMISSION 

Arthur C Monahan '00 of the U.S. 
Bureau of education and specialist in 
agricultural education, ban been commis- 
nloned a major In the national army for 
work In t he surgeongeneral'a department 
on the re-education of soldiers disabled 
in France. The work will deal with 
putting back into civilian life all such 
soldiers made unfit for farther service 
with a profession or trade by which 
tbey will be able to earn a living and 
will be carried on in reconstruction hos- 
pitals and existing educational Insti- 
tutions, Major Monahan, af cr gradua- 
tion terved as Instructor at tbe college 
for one year and then waa assistant 
principal of the Amherst high school, 
principal two years al Montague aud 
three years at Turners Falls high 
achool. For the p**i eight years be 
has been in tbe federal bureau as apec- 
iaJiM in rural school admi nisi rat Ion. 



r 



Scbillare's StuMo 

&6 /ram St., 

Hortbampton 





JACKSON & OUTLEB 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




Races start at *-*§ and 4-50. 

TWO-I.AT KM'BS 

fa*. 4-1W0 vs. unci. | 1W1 *s. IWO. 
Feb. ft-lOM ▼*• I" 8 ". ltf19 *»• ""' ' 
Feb li— IWO va. 1W0; •»"* *•- ntKl - 
Feb, 1»-10» vs. 1018 1 1M1 vs. unci. 
F«h. W -ItlS ** *«•; 1010 vs. 1011. 

TMRKK-I.AP ascaa 
Feb. «-iW0 n. un«*l i WW «• 1010. 

Feb. *-i«i w. iw*; »»■» •»• ttD * K 
Mar. 1- 1910 vs. 1080; 1»1** «■ «■■*• 
Mar 4- low va. 1018; i«wi «• «»« 1 " 
Ma*. 8-1018 vs. 1018; 1»» vs. !»!. 



P. al. BEHAN 



COMHONB CLU B PLEDGES 

The Common! Club has pledged the 

following ie«n: 
ms-Mellory^ijerntoff. 
19W -,Wiudew, Fanenf * Mather, We^, 

Jordan. 
IfSi-Davol, Alesander, Millet. 

Their initiation banquet will be h«W 

Saturday evening at th« F«ry. 



VARSITY RIFLE TEAM HAS 
POOR OUTLOOK FOR YEAR 

The outlook for a varsity rifle team la 
not bright at present, dne to lack of 
material. Men have not shown np well 
lor practice, and interest in thU branch 
of acttvi!ii"« seems to have taken a 
slump. However, a match la to be 
utaged between tbe freshmen and soph- 
„m<>rr Haw". Thm is to be run off as 
noun a* a date can he set. Tbe man- 
agers of each team should tee Captain 
Canle* as skm as possible, to ma*e tie 
necessary arrangements. Tbe fresh- 
men have abown ap fairly well le p»a«- 
tlce, but the aopbowotea have only bad 
one man out. Thla match counts as a 
regular inlerclasa contest, Tbe failure 
of either class to supply a team on the 
date set for the match will mean a for- 
feture of of the contest by the team. 

It will not be possible to keep the 
range open sll of e*er* day. A sched- 
ule of haws will be found on the range 
door. 

OOftftSCTlOM 

A wrong l»presstea has been created 
dne to the statement In last week's 
issue of the C«t,t,it«lAJt regarding the 
eoal iltuaiion in which It was stated 
that "Alpha Sigma Phi bad a half ion 
of eonl on Monday night, enough f«r 
another day." This statenunt wmild 
indicate thai a half ton «»t <-"Ri was 
necessary per day which la ridiculous. 
The truth was that the bouse had a 
half too the Wednesday before and by 
Tuesday thta would be nearly eahaoated. 



THIS IS JUST THE WEATHER FOK A 

SHEEPSKIN COAT 

Our» »re going fart but wc mill have «ome good on™. 

$6.50 to $24.00 

\\Y have jurt received a new lim- ol 

Reversible Custom Made Shirts 

that are worth ihe once over. 
Prices - $1.50 to $5.00 

Nit Hset-iif sot to $1.10 mmmm*m* fwiw t^w 7Se 
Stilts tod Overcoats from $12 to $25 






SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaflner ft Marx Clothes 



' ' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by th«> Student! of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 

BOARD OF KDITolts. 
MAItSIIAM. O. LA.N'I'HEAK •la.Kdltor-ln-Chlef 



Ahbociatk Ehitoks. 

AKTIHIt N. IIOWKN '1» 

KLIOT M. Ill KKl M '19 

AKTIII It I.. ( HANDLES Mil 

MVKTON r. BVAK8 '19 



BUSINESS I HP A UTM KNT. 
SAM I Kl. H. FKKRIIW 'I'.'. Assistant Manager 
li. M. < VMI'HKI.I.'.'U. A,l v»-i tiwiiuf Miinittf**! 

.IAMKS C. MAI'I.KS '.mi, ( in ulntlon 

U. ALFB2U SMITH -ii circulation 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify tin* business 
manager as SOOfl as possible. 



Entered at »e< ond-elan* matter at the Anihent 

Poet Office. 

Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday. Jan. 22. No. 13 



The College Student and the War. 

Herbert Hisiver, United States food 
Commissioner, has sent out tor publica- 
tion in all college papers the following 
pica in collage men. This applies very 
strongly to students at M. A. C, fur the 
oeed uf agricultural expert* promise* to 
be very great : 

**To the eolleuc nun «»f America 1 ad- 
dress myself with confidenc e, a eon* 

lidciice born ot unfold tabic ex peri- 

CM' 

"In the relief of Belgium, most uf the 
actual work of the Commission in the 
occupied territory was done by young 

\mcricau collegians. Kaclt time a call 
was made for volunteers many more 
than asked fur offered their services. 
And those that were chosen performed 
their duties, no! only effectively but 
with a spirit €if devotion that made their 
service beyond praise. They combined 
Idealism and elhcieney. It is the com- 
bination thai moves the world forward. 
loii.iv all the young college men of 
America lace a special i-Mpnnslljllity 
and duty, At no time in the world's 
history has the technically trained mind 
been si a higher premium. And this 
need lor it and dmnan I on it will con- 
tinue after the war is over, Hence the 
young man In college U faced with a 
serious problem . He must ask himself; 
Is the intwsdiate need of m« by my 
country in my present s(ag« of training 
greater than this need will be later, and 
when I have acquired a higher train- 
iogF ThU i« a question the clear an- 
swer to which numil be indicated for 
all by a single formula, because i he 
jr«arm men in college And themselves 
under varying el remits tan ess, Y»i an 
answer In general i. litis i»( wo me lo-lp- 
fuliitnw may lie made. 

To the younger men, the lower clias- 
men, only beginning (heir professional 
training, I say; Keep on with your 
college work. If the war lasts long yon 
will be needed more later than nowi 
and you will be better qualified to fill 
the need then. If the war ends boob, 
there will siill be argent need tor y«ur 
help in the neeesiiary great work of re- 
roimi fuel ion ami re hnl'Ilitai Ion. The 
more advanced ywir training, the more 
mature your judgment, the more valua- 
ble yon will lie. Hu try tn possess yonr- 
self in pat ieioe and sttak to your college 
work. 

Tn the upper clasaniari I would say: 



Mold yourself ready to respond lo your 
country's present need al any moment. 
Where you see your way clear to make 
your training useful, do not hesitate to 
follow the way. But you, too, should 
remember that every additional month 
or semester of i raining will make you a 
more effective helper to your country in 
this time pf its emergency, ever grow- 
ing more critical. .So be willing and 
ready to go out, but go in no thought- 
less hurry, nor merely to satisfy the 
natural nutfuTnom of the moment. 

Finally, to both lower and upper 
classmen, and to the great array - of 
American college and univrsity gradu- 
ates, I would say : 

The country looks to you fur justifica- 
tion of the advantages it has given or is 
now giving you. You are a privileged 
class. All special privilege brings spe- 
cial responsibility mid special duly. 
Yours is the advantage of the expanded 
mind nud the upiiited spirit, Your 
knowledge of I lie condition* and needs 
of your country, and your understand- 
iug of the real meaning of patriotism 
should be beyond those of the many de- 
nied your privilege. Therefore, your 
response to the call of your country's 
need should be quicker, more insistent, 
more poralatoat and more ready to adapt 
itself lo any form of ibis need than that 

of the unprivileged u v. You have 

already responded nobly to the call to 
the colon, lint imi all ol you ran now 
match to battle; not allot you should 
try to, but all who should not or can- 
not, and all who are sticking to their 
work of making themselves litter for 
their future service can still serve, and 
serve now. There is very much that 
you can do Hgbl now. 

1 would call your attention to just one 
of the many ways in which yog can 
help, mid help importantly. It is the 
way to Insuring the absolutely necessary 
food supply to ourselves and to our 
allies. 

Ks|MM>lslly must the food supply of 
our allies lw stressed. The vital world 
problem of food is not generally under* 
stood. The popular view is too self, 
centered, too selHsb - to use an ugly 
word. It does not look across the sea. 
The back-wash of Ku rope's misery does 
not carry to our shores, VTt do not 
know, and hence cannot feel, the pangs 
ot hunger, and pain of hunger weakness 
that are everywhere in Kurope. They 
are pains that are fell by our allies as 
well as by our foes. We mu«t make this 
known to all our people, that all our 
people may understand the great and 
Indispensable and Immediate role l bey 
most play in this nil-Important part of 
the war situation. You who ean readily 
understand must help. 

You can I m press on i be people around 
you, and wherever you go, the fact that 
the critical phase of the world food 
problem Is now, nut the qtieation of high 
or low prices, hut the question of pro- 
ducing and saving and Mending enough 
food to olir allies to keep them alive 
and st ton g and steadfast in war. The 
erIUcal question now In this war is the 
que*iion of t be actual physical strength 
of the lighting foes. 

You can understand It, and you can 
explain It. You can help us let the 
people of this country know that our 
allies depend absolutely 00 Us to mala* 
tali their food supply. They, them- 
selvee, simply cannot do it, If it is not 
done f«r them by ua the end of the war 
If near, and it is a bad end, an hwsoB- 
eeivably bad end, From every Amerf- 
ean college man the country expects the 
irnest devotion, the truest patriotism, 
and the highest service. And it will get 
it, Yon will give it, 



NOTICE ! 



Men leaving college and men chang- 
ing their address should notify the 
office immediately if they wish to 
receive the COLLEGIAN. 




The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. I\ M. is mild, fragrant slow Kurninir, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGl'K 

THAT'S WHY ITS PERFECT 



%*m. fan 

• •■/ "in 

»-<w. I an 

IS-oy- tsn 



25 (>nts 
$e rents 
•• tents 

MM. 



It Is ABSOLUTELY THE 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PRODUCED 



Muniir.i. tnnii by 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., Boston, USA. 



TA-TVA 




Any shoe-horn will blow about 
the comfortable fit ol our turn's 
Winter Oxfords! 

But the point this Winter is 
that they're mli feather. No imi- 
tation stufl in any part of them. 

Everthing college men wear, 
including uniforms. 

Prices moderate. 



n u en 
Rogers Prut Company 



HitNMtWM 

»t lath hi 



Hmsctway 

it wth nr 



HicMMlway 

at Warren 



MEW VORK CITY 



FifIS A »», 

lit 4lit Hi, 



THE DE LAVAL 
A WINNER ! 

Why don't you let it 
win for you? 



Ttir tsrand v<t„- ihs hluhf.t imaaHtto 
award—was ilv» tha tJ» 1***1 at th# Ps*. 
«ni».|*arlflr KxpMtiHia tn tm, M ^j^, w 
Buffalo, rt»i«i#o, m |^.ni». r*rta. HhmmIs, 
whUH ttts .i ssi w i ld «ia»li | »a» fat sw 
MMtMM 

And at pvtrrr contention ■# the National 
BnUerasakef*' AMor-lathm. butter ma4e 
frmn fiMin wprtttd 
br f >• La va 1 Pmjmtumn 
fcaa «. nr Ml htg tint — 
s M«* ramrd. which 
•nlr nun* aal m«rlt 
fcft* Mktf* pOMlMv 

The »nt«-fi«>rl!r irf 
Be Lam] hpmtsn 
» n«i «f IM !*¥»! pro- 
<i«e«ff etmm h no 
longer t|iir* turned. It 
to u arrr ptcd fart. 



THE IE LAVAL SEPARATOR 




ir.'i Hn<>4 n«r a \ 
KKW YORK 



»1. MaihhoxHt. 
f MirA-OO 



Northa mpton Players 

"THE SHOW SHOP" 



DRAPER HALL THE SCENE 

OF SUCCESSFUL INFORMAL 

Witlmul doubt, one of ila> mosl en- 
joyed informal (lames for MUM time 
was held in the south winu' <•!' Dia|ier 
Hall, last t Sa! unlay afternoon and even- 
in"', with over till collides in attendance. 
The Moor WM a wonderful improvement 
over (lie old Drill Hall surfaee, and the 
niusii lurnished by live uu-inlu-is ol tin- 
eolleu'e oreheslra was full <>f "|n-|i" and 
was easily ihe lies! eomliiiialion heard 
on the eamiius this year. Due lo Ifw 
room, the hall seemed, at first, to he a 
little crowded, hut I he dam-eis were 

comfortably held in the ipaet without 
any trouble, and proved to be a v«*r\ 
ai'eeptable subHtiiule. 

Supper wan very ih%erly lerved la 
the northeast wing, which was parti- 
tioned otT during the danee, and in this 
was a ureal convenience, doinu ;iw;i) 
with the usual walk to and from the 
Drill Hall. Duriim the second half a 
number of the sisiims aitemh-d the 
Vanity basketball sjaine. 

SMOKER AND GET-TOGETHER 



Dividends in ihe tobacco iftMM received 
anolhel' boast U|.«:ml before the junioii. 
put aniile their old corncobs at ilieir 
second amoker and eei-iouei he! in I he 
Social Union room;. last Wciliii'sihn 
e\. uing. 

A abort huiiineK* meetiuu wa> lirsi 
held al which tmiitern p*rt*lnituj tu run- 
iilng a junior dance mxi Btontb and ihe 
imaiiee.s of the linlrs were laken lip. 
Kollowine tins PvufetBpf I'aUersoii read 
anecdoics ami poems d« a liny with the 
war, the blu« gray aimosphen •>! ihe 
loom rexemblini: a ga« allaek bul all of 
which added a line realistic louch in his 
«torlea of the Iremhe-. I luce of the 
vanity captains, ail junior men were 
heard from allutgluu won pari lei pftttna 
in their sport ami to art] eo-oparatloo "• 
(he claaa, Mc< ariliy for bankethall, 
(hisholni for hockey, and Yesair for the 
rtlay team. Otber member* spoke ,.n 
varioUM mattcru the main drift being, to 
do moreatudylng. The lire (ben wm 
lighted and attention divided between 
tinging, erffw, i«*e cream, and Kdge- 
wortb i'laiia lor a junior aupper and 
smoker in Draper Hall are now under 
way. 



VARSITY SEVEN TO MEET 

TUFTS ON COLLEGE RINK 

Contest to be Staged Saturday After- 
noon. Medford Team Has 
Several Fast Men. 

The \alsity hockey team will cross 
sticks with TuftS on the vol lege rink, 

sauuda\ afternoon, In the first borne 

game Of the season. UtbtUlgb the, 

Medford college is represented on the 

ice this winter lor the lirsi lime, the) 
have a fast seven, and Under the eoaeli 
inu of 'Di.c" D'imiii of SoniervHle have 
rounded inlo ■ last UggregAtlOQ. In, 
the \ihitor's liinoip will in all probabil- 
ity be: Rtlgglefl, lol'lileliy Uf Meliill 

University; Biillngbaxn, erstwhile of 

WandeU'is: and I'.alloii. a foiinet Sled* 
ford HI Kb Star, Dartmouth took Tufts 

into camp Saturday, 6 u>0; ibe play of 
(apt Unrpb] of the «»reen at rover be- 
ing largely reeponsible fw tbe Hanover 

Stven'H win. The work ol I tie M, A. C. 

team a) Williantstown, Saturday, was 
bigb grade, and wlifa another week ol 
practice on gitod lee Ibe Uaroon and 

While seven shoiild «ive I he Tillts boy* 
a still battle The lineups wiil piob- 
abl] be as lolloWv : 



THE AIM 



After twenty-five years close business association with -the best diesstd 
men in your college : 

To keep our lines of young men's togs so utterly smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

ihat it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, »o unusually smart %l trench " overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

1 leadqu.ii tcis for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best cost made, 
Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 



Tt t i" 

Crocker, u 
Perry, p 
Kienegan, rp 

itillinuham. \w 
Hal Ion. e 

Huggles, m 
Burnt I net l . rw 



M. \ < 

g, Faxnn 
p, Crafts 

ep. Smith 
lw, I.ea\i«l 

e. Kidding 

p., t'hishidm 
rw, Met an hv 



Drop in at 



"YE AGGIE INN" 



Board by week or al-a-carte 

$5.^0 



This Week 



SOPHS BUSY 

At a meeting of ihe ■ opfcomore elass, 
Friday after ebspel, ibe following utt- 
cerm were elected; Presblpni, Warren 
M. Dewiiiu of Kingwton; rtet presldflnt, 
Carroll W. Dnnker of W*e»t Homervltle; 
«ecretsry, Barle I), totfetvp ol We*i 
Hridgewateri irtjaiurcr. tlinton J. 
Daggett of Wwhlngtoti, I». C; ■er»»»nl- 
at-arms, Urmik* ¥, Jakeman of W la 
cbwter; claw captain, Kenneth Hlnieh 
ardof Highland Fall», N. V.; etaM hi«- 
tiirlan, Marlon Early of West Ncwtoa. 

At * meeting of the w»phouii»ri> c1a*«, 
held a*t« chapel on Moi.dav, it •» 
voted to hold another mnoker on Jan. 
SO, In* plannefl at tbt* time to (ta- 
com the •luesllun ot UoartcinE an t title % 
ter n«»t year. A eowinitfee efl«po«ed 
of C. J. Daggett. K. ». btedman and ! 
f, f^-Iten waa appo'riied u» look 
the natter. The iwbject ol Claw l»y* 
I^wmlsaliw to be brought up at lUt 
time. The commit ice to draw lhe«' »i» 
^^ present them o. the class !«**•* 
po^d oi i arroll W, Bunfecr, Philip S. 
^awcll and Uuaata Fuller. The e.,m. 
m, i tee In charge ol i be smoker i« the 
same one thai ran the Ia»l •>«»« M 

»Ueee»nfuH> 

*W.— B. M. Baytnoth ha* boagbt » 
far« In MicblgatJ, and will d«» hi« part 
toward Inertaaing tbe food »upply. 



Candy, Tobacco 

Student Supplies 

Run for Aggie Men 

By Aggie Men 



H. E. SPWLOIHO 19, Mimir 




IT TAKES 400,000 can to 
carry American Fert£li2ere 
erery senann Forty per 
em£* is useless FtQar requiring 
160,000 caraf InsJat on leaa 
FiHe r and higher grades with 
roost Available Nhrogen, via.t 

Nitrate of Soda 

and cut freight bills. 

Use of such Fertilizers 
rneans everybody's benefit. 
It is u p to y ou , Mr. Farmer. 
|sjal toVCttf sMwl 

DR. WM. S. MYERS 

Qhttlor, Chthmm l&rMm CWwnni m.1 
3S BfcClsssi * >!-—■ 



Hww * ..#a 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, • Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



»» 



"BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And ntlie* B'""1 Ibbsjs to est. 

MKS. L. M. STHBBIN5, 

Middle Street, Hadley. Mass. 

Tel. 4i l- W 

The Highland Hotel 

Innirf «f Mllln«mn :ui«l RanSM a*r»«ni. tlin c 
lilm ku fnnii tlir I ni. >ti IM-IM.I, to» nuMlfui him 
It In i mi in. ill"' Kiiri.i^nii flan. It !« Mi»» .'( "•»•■!> 

ft Main Kneel . sway from tb«> noitu* nfiitilnat, 

:in«t tm in tin- tents* <-r « t»#- ltu»iii*«» dlstrli i. 

M » nmnii are well fiirnlntieil ;imt e«a>forUble. 
ii»\ius » istopfe^SM jihI tan »tnt rold raontna 

%mit<r In t>\eiy nmni. I'f !<*»•» $1 bimI «|i. riiini]» 
villi bMh i»ln«t«'itl.5aainl «i|> 

Its «x«*«ll«nt rnlilne and wi I 'iniii.itiii.iin 
li»K riHim miln a ni.il t pti-snunl mrmmi 
ev*>?MiittiiiM»f ta* hiwliixi Mimtiij . «rii rooketl 
anil M*rv»>il in I In- 1m -i M«u»lble BWirim i 

M«jst l*e HlBliUtiii llmel iin.i- niitl *M will 
3iillrll«t* -l.ulnit lh*-r* uitiilti Mimic srsrf 
m iiiitiu 

D. H. Sievers, 

Highland Hsisl. Ssrissfleld. Hat.. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

\l-\t till UllpUlll's 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books I ounlAiii I'rii.i 

AsenM tor l£.-n I j iK*wrlin 

P. M. CURRAN C. F. DYF.R 




RAHAR'S INN 



Nurthainpton. 

wtmMwrum 



MaaMfbuserta 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

«7 Main Street, Masonic Ftuilrling. 
NortbamfJlon, ,\ta-»v 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



( />»,,/ ,mh fmm / A, M. to 4 A. '/ 

The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co, 

J1.MM.n1 «f Wrmiiflil Iron nnd ISranji ¥%pm 
1 Ittlntffi ' ■'- mid 

1*1 r»* 

Ilea 

i« 1 nil 1 «mtim«*torn for Hfiiiifi mnit 

Ilealiri*, A wf imbM tr Flifliikler 

■Jill,.,!,., H<iit«r »n»t Migttii' * '«>n»iei ili.w*. 

rtiiijsM.mta* 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable — Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY 

Kurope an 1*1 an 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUOS AND CARPRTS 

- K. D. MAHWII tarrATB — 



StKI'HKN IjAM: Kdl.tiUv. Ise. 

M*<nri.'ii'IIIMi Jr«'i;nm 
lf«» ItmkAllU'.W. NKW YORK 

<'i.i*n \>'i> nii,l.K,uK 

I'INH AMI WINfiN > 

OIII.I). MII.VBIW tut! NNOMUtt MRIWla 



DR. GEO. A. HAS WELL 

«» — 1 •■•»!».- 1 1 la 



78 Main 81. 
"illiimi |>ta >■ 1. 



Johnson Book Go. 

Agricultural Books 
-:- Filing Oases -> 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Hifjma Phi House 

Writing Paper 

With Class Nimenls ind College Sells 

AH kfndanf 

Loose-leaf Books and F< 



A. J. 



I 



i 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 



THE DINING HALL 

is offering most attractive board 
to the student body. 

The get-together, songs and 
college life, and good times cen- 
ter about the dining hall. 

The calleteria offers a-la-carte 
service. 

The main dining room serves 
monthly board. 



It K C K IVf A IV» S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** HAMP »» 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

is richer in protein than must meats 
and is very niut-h eheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 

Also try our fancy cheese: 



Neufchatel 
Olive 



Pimento 
Club 



All products maile from pasteur- 
ized milk and cream. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday, 
Jan. 24 

(One ilny »til> I 

No advance 

in price* 

Friday. 

Jan. 25 

(Oft* (iny only) 

No advance 

In price* 

Saturday. 

Jan. 26 

one day imiy i 

Me advance 

in price* 



George Be ban in "A Road* 

aide Impresario" 
rathe WeeKly, Bray Cartoon 



Thursday antf 
Friday. 

Jan. 31 and 

Feb. I 

\nlt.i -Miwart 



Feb. 2 



Pauline Frederick 

h. "Sap ho" 
Pirloer.ph 

Paramount Comedy 

Lillian Walker In 

"Indite ret ion" 

"The Fifth ting Trail" 

Palhe Wee h I y . Bi « V Comedy 

IVc^a-ct Weoli I 

Anita Mtmmmrt in 
"Tho Olrl Phlllpoa 

• imrtn. 
frli inffir'TtieUirl I'liiiipfi 
Afiernoon* Evening* 
adana. 15c ki...h. 20c 

i lilliitrn. 10c lt:i|..nty. 25c 

Anita Stewart in 
"The Glory of Telanda" 

"ThP Fllhltnt Trail " 
Paths WenkMy Comedy 

K« atlvntire in prii *■*. 



Dairy Department 

Mass. Asrlt-ultnral (Village. 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: l-'l. M p. »i. Sunday and 
other hours l».v appointment. 



'|l»"i> irf Atom i • m4 '■< MSe-iSyhAf f«»u should 

huV \: H 

COAL 
C. R. ELDER 

COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk clown town mnl eteSM aw *nnetlle. 

Ban i» » 'm i ■ mmi Bad lb* i-les mother niakfi. 

Good Service and Reasonable Prices 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOGAL.LY: * 3 Center St., Northampton Mass. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKBKS vm» I'miin OltKSSMcS 

W if or, WALK i»m.\ 

Href, Mutton, Lamb, Vaal, Park, Hams, Bacon, §n 

sages, Poultry, (lime, Butter, Cheese, 

Bnii Olive Oils. 



HI.i. k.iMiic. Jfortb and North Centre Hireeta, 
TOW, , , . , ftA, 




Russell, Bordsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Go. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



KffTAIM.IMIKIi im/. 



Maker, 1 EMPIRE "V^ 



The Celebrated 



PRINTERS, 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Last Saturday a party of the faculty 
went to Ml. Toby on a wood chopping 
tour. The aim of the party was for each 
man to cut a cord of wood to help re- 
lieve the coal famine. Among the 
woodchoppers was President liutterfleld. 

The Aggie Hoy Scouts held a meeting 
in the old ehapel last Friday for the 
purpose of thawing up a constitution. 
It was decided to postpone their first 
"hike" until Saturday, Jan. 26. Reg- 
ular meetings will he held every Mon- 
day noon after chapel. 

Hockey practice has been impossible 
this season because of the condition of 
the ice and large amount of snow but 
an appeal to the student body brought 
out a number of men who gladly han- 
dled a shovel for a while and a iinal 
practice on real ice before the Williams 
game w as possible. 

The Ireshineii had their own way in a 
practice basketball name with Hopkins' 
Free AraiU-inv last Thursday afternoon. 
The si ore was :i:'-lti when the last whis- 
tle sounded. Although the two teams 
were evenly niatrhed, the Hopkins' 
boys totted difficulty in getting near 
their own baskfl. The name was ehar- 
arttiized by many long shots from the 
middle of the tloor ami by good te;iin 
work, which was especially noticeable. 



FACULTY 

P. H. Elwood, formerly in the land- 
scape department, is Captain in the 
field artillery training in Texas. 

Ur. John B. Lentz of the veterinary 
department who enlisted in the officers' 
reserve last July has been transferred 
to the national army with the rank of 
captain and is now at Camp Upton. 

At a meeting of the Massachusetts 
dairymen's association held in Worces- 
ter two weeks ago, Prof. W. P. B. Lock- 
wood was elected secretary and Prof. O. 
A. Jaimson assistant secretary. 



Ho i, 



. Mass 



COMMONS CLUB SERVICE FLAG 

A new service Hag has been seen 
hanging I roin the ("ominous flub rooms 
in North Collage. There are 2*2 stars 
on the tlag, representint: men who were 
in college when war was declared. 
Those represented on the Hag are as 
follows; 

1P17 
Ralph W. Klliot. G Oo.Mtad Infantry, 

( amp Havens 
lleniiitn i, Nash. :ird Training Camp, 

Taphank 
Herbert I). Smith, I'. S. Army 
James J, Warren, Camp Devens 
Carlton M. Stearns, Medical Corp! 

1918 
Lelatid C. Alien, Medical Corps 
Ralph K. Allen, Navy, Mosquito Fleet 
Roger K. Clapp, Convoh Autos, S. S. 

P. M par B, C M., Paris. France 
Harold c. Fellows, Camp Gordon 
Hamilton K. Foeler, IT. 8. Kxpedition- 

ary Fo!t-*», Frame 
Cavil le 11. Fuller, Signal Corps Avia- 
tion, Sen Antonio, Texas 
Fla*el M. Uifford. Camp Merrill, N. J. 
I i I 11. Sampson, 1st Lieut. Depot Hrl- 

Hade, Ayer 
John Stowe, Camp iJeveos 
Raymond W. Swiff, si b 

France 

1MB 
Frederick Chapln, Camp DereM 
Kdwin P. Cooley, grd Training 

Yaphank 
Manrtw Mane, Fort l^renworth, 

Kansas 
Edwin B. Newton 
Frank A. Woods, Camp IJevens 
Paul S. Seavey, U. S. Navy 

iWO 
Milton t , McDonald, V, S, Avbntanee 

Corps, A lb-Hi ow ii. Pa, 

COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The competitors for I be business board 

of {oi.i.KfHAS stood is follows op to 
Jan. 15th. 

F. K. Parke *il 1M 

F. C, • haiuiell SI 11,© 

It. M, HiMlgstin "21 10.0 

(4. W. Fdraan *»i 9M 

P. L. Kobinson *21 S.i 

11. r. Peek *21 I.W 

R, V, Tillson '21 S.00 



COLLEGE STATUS MAY BE 

TECHNICALLY CHANGED 

As a result of the anti sectarian bill, 
passed by the State Legislature last 
Spring imposing certain restrictions on 
slate institutions relative to receiving 
aid from the commonwealth, a tentative 
draft of a bill desirable to make the col- 
lege a state institution, in the strict sense 
of the word has been introduced into 
the legislature by Senator Churchill of 
Amherst. This would dissolve the pres- 
ent corporation and the college shall be 
maintained by the commonwealth as a 
state institution under the same name. 
Trustees of the present corporation 
shall be trustees of the state institution 
ami they will hold their same standing 
as to appointments, -lowers, and duties, 
General laws applicable to state instil n- 
lions shall nol be applicable to the col- 
lege unless by expressly sta'ed laws. 
This act simply detines the position of 
the college in the sight of the anti aid 
bill and says that nothingshall be taken 
for granted that the college i«i not now 
or has not been a state institution. 



POOL ROOM NOW OPET 

The Social I'nion pool room in the 
basement of North College was finally 
opened to the students Friday evening 
for the rest of the year, provided ex- 
penses are made. The hours are 8 p. m. 
io lo e. m. on week days and 1 p. m. to 
it) i-. M.oti Saturdays. Pool will cost 
one cent a eue and billards ten cents an 
hour, and no credit. Gambling will be 
absolutely prohibited and the rule en- 
forced. Boyd * 18 will have charge of 
the tables. 



PROFESSOR GAOE DECEIVES 
COMMISSION 

George K. Gage, assistant professor of 
pathology, his received a commission 
as first lieutenant in the National Army. 
He has been ordered to report to the 
commandant of the Pnlted Stales Medi- 
cal School In Washington. Prof. Gage 
was graduated from Clark I'niversity of 
Worcester, and later of Yale University. 
After serving as chemist in the United 
Stales Department of Agriculture in 
Washington in 1908, as biologist in the 
Maryland Experiment Station in U*O0, 
and as a special student in pathology in 
I'niversity of Michigan, he was called 
to M. A. C. In 1111 and has since been 
located here. 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA SERVICE FLAG 

The fourth fraternity to fly a service 
fiag fs Phi Sigma Kappa. This Hag, un- 
furled last week contains 21 stars for 
men who were in college when war was 
declared. These men and addresses are; 

1917 
David H. Bnttriok, Quartermaster Corp., 

FLSloeUIH. 

Capt. F. G. Edwards, 901st U'd'q Police, 

Camp Devens, 
2d Lieut. Louis D. Boss, U. 8. It. Am, 

Ex. Forces B. C. M, 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 
Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
"dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRin CLARK & CO., aS et ' 




THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, Lincoln and Kingston Btt.. 
BOSTON, nASS. 



Only two blocks from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and easily reached from North Station 
by Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail ihopa and uualneas centre, 
also to the theatres and places of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent spon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



1918 
1st Lieut. William 11. Boas, U.S. B. De- 
pot Brigade Camp la-c 
2d Lieut. Ralph \V. llarwoud, U.S. R. 

Co. K 102d Inf. Am. Ex. FotWM. 
Robert D. llawley, H. »>, t- 0. (amp, 

Camp Upton. 
Paul F. Hunnewell, R. O. T. C. Camp, 

Camp Upton. 
Douglass H Huntoon,8uppl> Co, :i02d 

Inf., Camp Devens. 
Richard W. Thorpe, Harvard Radio 
School. 

1919 
Kails Roland, 101st U. fit. Knuineers, 

Am. Ex. Forces. 
James P. Davies, Signal Corps, Burling- 
ton, VI. 
Howard M. Ooff, Harvard Radio School. 
Euslgu William L. Kimball, V. b. Naval 

Academy, Annapolis. 
Blton .1. Hansell, R. <>• T. C, (amp, 

< 'amp I'pton. 
Clifford A. ltowe, It. O. T. 0. VU»f> 
Camp Upton. 

IMO 
Charles 11. HaHon, able seaman. I . 

S Navy. 
Ivan A. Roberts, Royal Flyinu « '-rpx. 

tamp Borden. 
John 1». Snow, Ballon Section. Signal 

Corps, 
(leorge II. RU-hards, Balloon BeetlOO, 

Signal Corps. 
Donald Rons, Aviation Section. Signal 

Corps. 
Donald C. Douglass, Balloon Section. 
Signal Corps. 



S. S. HYDE 

j ». x-v » - 1 «.- 1- nml Opt lolmi 

18 Pleasant Slreel 

Ooaitsts' Prescriptions Hilled, HteJum i,i»n»#a 

Accurately Keplaced. Kim* Watch Keimlr- 

lng I 'io in i >t I > ,i ml Skilfully limit*. 

Satisfaction Uuarsntesd. 

HOW IS THE SOLE WITH YOU ? 
Get Your Shoes Tapped 



1. I'AIII 1 I I 



P, L. PABI ii I 

CROYSDALE INN 

SOI TH UAllI.KV. MASH. 

Luncheons, Afternoon Teas, Dinn-ira 

imon rsisos i" i tfi 

IV I. MR w 



— A1 



mitv SI. 



GINSBURG'S, A 

Work neutly done Satinfaitliin tfumanl.-iil 

Watch for information 
on the coming 

LIBERTY LOAN! 



LOCAL CORRESPONDENT 

Wanted to represent well- 
Known banking house in 
this territory dealing in list- 
ed securities. Opportunity 
to develop extensive busi- 
ness. Write John D. Beyer, 
Kimball House, Springfield, 
and arrange personal inter- 



view. 



James W. Brine Oo. 

286 Devonshire St. ■ - Boston 

Athletic and Sporting Goods 



WABEf€p?iwt^ 



COLONIAL INN 

Southern Cooking Popu- 
lar ! Well, I should 
say so 1 1 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

Northampton, 

Where the Best 

Photo-Play 

Features ... 

Are shown, 

CHANCED DAILY 







RY ADAMS & CO. 

The taiall Store 



Sodas 

Cigars 
Candy 



M l MM NOTES 

'05— F. h. Yeaw, h«l !»•■ :i-.|n.inled 
Deputy Sheriff fur Chares Conaly, New 
|fextao< 

•Qg—U, K. Alley a< Nurih Wllhraham 
U going Weat.aml a*kn u» to nay thai 
he has for Rale Bopteeol 1 1. »- RMofoff 
1905-1910 and the QM-UM1 mWtmS 

1904 iy«*. 

»10_Henry A. Brooks and M1m rTorrn 
L. Iluracker were married Use. I, 1917, 
at Luray. Va. 

'11. -Samuel B. raraona has aecepled 
as ai.fH»iniiHi»Dl as aaalaiant pkysletst 
with l he NatiniiHl Uureaii of Standarda 
and after Jan. 16 will he enija«ed on 
military research on pr.iblema »«• 
neeted with aeroplane eniinea. 

*18,— A. S. Topper ha* been In r'ranee 
for the paat ■!* and a half DKtatha with 
areKimeiil «d engineer-.. No one tian 
heard "hide nor hair" from hint for lhe 
last two montba. 

•lf». K. H. BarUetl 9m eallwl n. 
ChlUic-.il he, but baa been app..inifd »o 
take part in the ofBcera* training «-awp, 
whirh has been established. 

»!*.-*. »• Dnp*- 1 ! laadsea^ arehi 
leetolCharloUe, ». C.» has an eKten- 
ilTe illostrall-re aribsle on "Seal Kai ale 
r^felopmeflt" in the last numlwr ..f 
U'.iUy, U» also has an extended dj»- 
ruaaion on "Mill Village Plannini" in 
the Sonlhera TeatUe Bulleiin of Ok. 

is, mi, 

<1«.~-XIm Mae Holrien waa married 
to Wdney W, Wheeler at Boston. Jan. 
IS, She has been emrafot in the Ijoc- 
any department and will ,«,ininne her 
work at college. Mr. Wbeel^r hi «.,,„- 
necled wrth the Saffolk m^nvn bank Of 
Boston. 

«l«,-irunitB 8. C«»le> wa,- inarHed 
tciMlaa Helen h. HlUshcw* el BWltli 
Norwslk. Conn, on June m. W,. 
•Tommy** Hermck* 18 waa beat man. 
"Bill" is •>«■■* rp«t«-'» n « *' We»tf»ort. 
Conn, where beta teaehiBK aeieneea and 
»acbing athletic* In the Htaplea High 
school. 



Official Outfitters for M.A.G. Military Uniforms and Supplies 

Outfits 



Teanis Supplies 
Basketball 



Bathing Satta 
Hockey 



Football 
Socc er 



THE DAVENPORT 

A homelike stopping pUcc i«»r "Afgie" men. 

A new, modern house with every conventence 

AFTER-SUPPER PARTIES, 1ANQUETS, *s. 



Mrs. J. K. W. I^kvenport, 



Pleasant St. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 

write fftfl-is^v t«-i»» prl ooa oaw 

E. Fraok Coe Fertilizers 

1857 1h»m^w™fmtwm'Wlmm4mr*nT*U**M** 1917 

Ask For Oir Crop Sools, ti WA MM Ap* h 






>. i. i i f-.- \ii<-"o-.v »i*»t-s**B»«* 

THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 



Sntislif tart «»f ffc« a»nrt-»s asrt* 1 ***'* 31 * -0 

si wirnw mm • • * m-wemr 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 1918. 



I) 



WORK IN RADIO CLASSES 
PROMISES TO BE OF VALUE 

Instruction to Embrace Many Inter- 
esting I'lmss. Practice Equip- 
ment Being Installed. 

The buzzer signaling courses under 
Professor itobbiiia have become well 
established and the class is slowly be- 
soming adept in (he work. The major 
part ill' the time has been devoted to re- 
ceiving by the class from a single buzzer 
ami all sorts of combinations and jum- 
bles have been given them. <)u two of 
the four nights a week, Professor Bob- 
bing plans to give a half hour lecture 
on electricity and its fundamental ap- 
plications to radio telegraphy. This la 
largely elementary, but forms the basis 
of all advanced work. 

\ tiatigeinents have been completed 
with tiie rural engineering department 
whereby Professor Gunness is planning 
to give the six enlisted men who are 
now awaiting calls to aviation training 
schools, practical lectures and laboratory 
work in engine construction, repair and 
handling. Each man will he given the 
opportunity of familiarising himself 

with all phases of yas engines and their 
behavior. This week work will be 
started on taking down an old Pope 
engine-. 

These various phases of the work 
closely conform to the work now being 
given at the Harvard radio school pi He- 
lically the only difference being that of 
thoroughness of instruction simply dut 
to a much longer period and unlimited 
supply ot equipment. In fact, the direc- 
tor of (he Cambridge school has given, 
in a more or lens tentative manner, 
words to the etlect that a petty oflicci 
may be detailed to examine the men 
here so to their radio ability hi place oi 
a trip to Boston all of which speake* 
well for the work as at present. 

The equipment end here at the college 
h;is given some trouble but is sow being 
cleat.-- 1 op, Enough has been obtained 
for twelve men In the laboratory consist- 
lag of keys, buzzers, and head tele- 
phones. These are being put Into place 
in the sophomore In burnt ary and practi- 
cal work will be taken up by the indi- 
vidual men In botb sending and receiv- 
ing. The other twelve men will he 
given the buxter receiving in the lecture 
room and then will alternate with one 
another. Lack of room makes group 
shifting neeossary, The installation of 
a sending machine is a matter of a fev 
days thus greatly helping in the practise 
work. 

POM CLUB STAGES DEBATE 

An Interesting and Instructive debate 
by the junior* on the subject A com- 
mercial orchard should be limited to 
four varieties** was held Thursday even* 
at a regular meeting of the Pvatolngy 
elub in French Hall, the derision going 
to the affirmative. A goodly number 
were on band to hear Howe, liurioit and 
Thomas put np the better argument* 
over the negative men, Stafford, W, 
Smith and Hun well. Faxon was chair- 
man and the judges were Professor 
Sears, Huberts "IS, and A nderson . It 
Is hoped that another may be arranged 
for Ih lite near fniute, A basketball 
team rep rese nt* the club but so tar n« 
other organization on the campus has 
dared to meet them an the Drill Hall 
■ear. 

*14.— Tell W, Nicole! (« now assistant 
engineer in the ICagtaeerfng «livl»ioo- 

of the Quarterm;i*ieis* C,.r|*s canton- 
ment division Unrated in Washington, 
and is doing work along lines of 
Landscape Knglneering for which he 
trained at Aggie 



WAR SAVING STAMPS 



For Sale at the Treasurer's Office. 



The main reason for their purchase is 
that the Country is at War. 

To win we must win as a united people. The savings of every 
man, woman and child are needed to hasten the ending of this war. 

SAVE TO SERVE 

Every War Saving Stamp is a direct obligation of the Govern- 
ment — a Baby Bond. It is redeemable in five years at 4 per cent 
compound interest. 

Each stamp costs a quarter. Buy 16 gtampi and attach them 
to a card which is given you when you buy your first stamp. 
When your card is fd led it has cost you $4.00. Take the full 
card and exchange it for a $5. 00 War Saving Certificate upon an 
atlditional payment of 12 cents. You then have a Certificate re- 
deemable in five years for the full value of $5.00. 



Ask the Committee lor any information : — 
Chapman, 1918 Bower), \. 10,19 

I- "icy. k;iS 

Pratt, 1918 
Russell, 19 1 S 
Smith, C. T.. 1918 



Huff urn, 1919 
Kurt, 1919 
Callanan, J ., 1919 
Chandler, 1919 



Campbell. 1920 
.smith. R. N., 1920 
H.illett. 1921 
I.ockwood. 1921 



COLLEGIAN 

Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercol, Athl. 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Aaaotiation, 

Basketball Association, 

Football Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Inter das* Athletic Commiit« e. 



DIRECTORY 

Tclri.tmiic 

C. A. Peters, Secretary- 454 W 

P. A M( 1. 1 ugh lin. Secretary — 43 2- R 

< S. Hicks, Treasurer— 403 -M 

H. K. Kobbins, Manager - res, 62 W 

II L. Russell, President— 416 

( (■ Mituwiii. Manager— 8338 W 

R, U Collins, Acting Manager— 8336 

J. A. Chapman, Manager— $3 14 

S, P. Batchddar. Manager— 8364 

F. II. Canlett, President — S338-W 

M. F. Kvans, Manager— 8347 

ri M. llufTum, Manager— 833S \Y 

R. U Boyd, President— 416 

II I,. Russell, President— 119 R 

John Yesair, Secretary— 8346 



Amherst Co-op. Laundry 




High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
i„!Inr«, - 
* u II-. - 
Plain Wa*h. 
Same, rough dry. 



- 2 \-2i 

2I-2c 

per do*. 48c 

per drw. 



Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

itM Pressing 40c, A suits for $1,00 
I *r v ('leaning nnil Preying, $1.59 a Suit 



an Mil* |»f«bl# at r<»lle«e «nti mnt fmrvete 
left Iftere wilt ret-clvr prompt sttenttos.' 



O. K. Babbitt 'i?. Alpha Siftia Phi Honse ; F, E, Cot, % J a.* 20, College Store. 



CIGARS 

CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

NVe carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE &HOFMAN 



CARS 



M. A. C. (or Hoi yoke 720 aid hourly 
until 11-20 P. H, 

M. A. C, fur Amherst 6 10,6-45, 7"-°. 1 5°- 
S05. 8 to, then 20 mm. and 35 mm, 
after the hour until iq^o P. H Other 
car* at 1 1-50 A. u„ 3 50. 550, 7-50, 95©. 
10-5© P. M , and a MM cat at ii-20 P. M. 

Amherst for M. A. C. 605. 630. then 
half-hourly until 800 A, ,w ., 8 15, o-»$, 
then 15 mm, and 30 mm, ait. r the hour 
until 11 jo P. M. (Hot « ara at 1200 
norm and 4-00, 600, 8 00,10 00 P. M. and 
a last car at 12 30 p. M. 

^JS^fc »■ I V* WW C * 



APHERSI i SUNOtRLAND SI. RY. CO 



Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIDE 

».-f,t» ruftil*lilr.« fittetl 

it AMITY sratrr 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton. 
through the Hatfield*, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt„ alongside the 
fanou Bloody Break bank ground 
to OW Deerfield, theo« to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plami w to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Kail*. 

99 M lie* of Trackage - 1 ode rn 
I qiiipmcnt train Dispatch - 
lng.S>»tem l-rcight and !:*• 
prtaa Aarvtca over eattra llna. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 





*> 8 1 1918 




-^va 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 29, 1918. 



No. 14 



ALUMNI DAY ATTENDANCE 
SMALL BUT ENTHUSIASTIC 

Graduates are Entertained by Ath- 
letic Contests, Musical Clubs, 
and at Banquets. 



FIRST HOCKEY GAME AT 
HOME VICTORY OVER TUFTS 



Chisholm and Crafts Score the Win- 
ning GohIs During Fait 
Second Half. 



1 



o c 
■2 « 

~7 



Another alumni «t;iy has become 
history and thin DIM, Ihe llfth of these 
now aniiunl get-lnget bars, while lacking 
in oanbera, audi hi* "' aathBalaaaB. 

There were sbOttt til t > of t lie old Kiads 
011 the eampiiis. only one half the num- 
ber in attendance a* were baek last year 
but theu eondiiioiiK were dilferenl than 
now for Mars had (tot b e eoTBt i|uiie so 
intimate with atlair-j. 

Friday was jjiven over to the return- 
ing men a«* a day ot "major talks" to 
the undergraduates. This is an idea 
triad out last year and was so giu-rvnful 
that it was repeated this winter. Each 
alumnus thai spoke in the seelloim bad 
a distinct message lor I be youu»er tupn 
and throughout them all ran the view 
of the ueed of aeuuiriim funuainentals 
and a hn.ad liaininir for "the purpose 
of thinking and learning quickly In sub- 
jeetn ■ at prepared In." 

In the evening an Alumni dinner waa 
held In Draper Hall and a good majority 

of (he student body Was on hand tai see 
what the Itoys ot the eighteen and early 
-liueteeii hundreds looked like and bad 
• 1 say. It wan a lirely enough lime, 
loinewhat erowded but nevertheless. 
*iiod natuted and happy. BoBfl bf the 
iindergrailuaies preceded the program 
• >t speakers 

President HutierJield. an (oaattuaaler, 
weleomed the alumni baek and made a 
number of remark* concerned with the 
work of the college during the war both 
from agricultural and military stand- 
points together with a number of gent ral 
remarks on the present position of the 
college. Thi- other apeakera were I'nd. 
H. F. Tomp*in *06 of the market garden- 
ing department ; Newlon Mmltes *WI: II. 
E, Maker 11 director of the extension 
■erriee at Uouueciteot Agriculinra) e«.l 
le«eiP. M. Harwoed "iB of the state 
dairy bureau and W. L. Morwe *M. 

FoflowlBg tbia all adjoBrned to the old 
chip*] where an excellent concert wan 
given by lh# eollege glee and maodwlln 
elulm, 

Batttrriay wu md Uj advantage by 
many In renewing their old haunts and 
acquaintance* of the < ampua and coin, 
paring the present grow! h of the college 
In the **ohl day". In th# aflern.H.ii 
so m e f b i n g nwra at r»B mm ua •» c n j i . , ed 
by witnessing an .M. A . 6, bo«key victory 
over Tufts on the e<dleue pond, I" A* 
evening many participated In their fra- 
lernitiiy'i annual imftaUon Iian«|iiei« 
held at varioua toMl ami netgblM»rtng 
plaeaa. 



*18,— f. W. Jeronie and Miaa k, M. 
Breed were married In Steekbridfa Jan. 
it. Porter '18 now Ueal. !a tfca TJ. ». 
A rmy waa bet! man. 



PROF. PAYNE TO BE GENERAL 
Y. M. C. A. SECRETARY 

Takes Position Left by Mr. Cotton. 

Many New Ideas to be Put Into 

Effect. New Office Hours. 



The first hockey game against Tufts 
tesiilted in a victory for M. A. C, Sat- 
urday alteinooii OI the college pond. 
by a score of :t to ti. Hard work by the 
whole student body, including the 
team, had produced a fair nurfaee of 
ice, after the heavy falls of snow, and a 
good si/.eil crowd was 011 band to see 
the lirst home game of the seanon. 
Tufts' first hockey team is hardly on a 
par with her reputation in other sports. 
The forward line showed a decided lack 
of team work on the otiense, and the 

14 1 work of the defense was all that 

kept the SOON down. 

In the first half the play was fairly 
even, neither team seeming yet to have 
settled down to hard playing, and no 
scoring rounded. 'the second half 
started off fast, with the puck in Tufts' 
territory most of the lime. After about 
five minutes of play (rati* caged a 
pretty goal on a long, fa«t shot from 
near tbe center of the rink. Soon after, 
Captain t'liisholm found the puck, dur- 
ing n scrimmage in front of Tuftti* net, 
and pushing through 1 he opponents, be 
succeeded in getilug tbe dlsr Info the 
net, nearly following If in himself. 
The play stayed in tbe Tufts half of the 
rink after that, and about three minute* 
licioietlo" end of the half I, em it se 
cured the puck behind the cage, passed 
out to f'hishoitn, who waa directly in 
front and uncovered, and tbe third 
score shot passed Kmmuna. The play 
was even during the real of th» came, 
slid Faxon had two good stops to bis 
credit, white Ballou and Burtnett 
played well for Tufts. 
The summary: 

m. a. o. Turra 

Leaviit . Iw rw, HIHnghaBi 

Beddim; c, Ballou 

t'hi«holm,r r, Dick son 

McCarthy, rw la*, Bunnell 

(•raffs, cp ep. rinneian 

s,„iih,p P, Parry 

Panon, g 8, Kmmotts 

Uosls made by -fhisholni 8, f*raff». 
stops Faion 7, Kmmons 7. Keferee- 
Wibh.n. Timer- Dickinson. Time— K 
minute halves, 



Prof. Loyal 9. Payne, It. 8e , has ac- 
cepted the position of general secretary 
of tbe Y. U. V. A., and is to put in pari 
of his time in the work of Ihe associa- 
tion. The executive cabinet of the so- 
ciety has been trying for some time to 
get 11 secretary who would be able to 
put full tune into I he work, as Tom 
(of ton had planned. Prof. Payne will 
..pen the V. M. C. A. office in North 
College, and his office hours are as fol- 
lows: Mondays, Tuesdays. Wednesdays 
aad Fridays, 1 to S r. m.. Thursdays 1 l«» 
1 ;i<> p . \t. Prof. Payne plans toestah. 
Iisii a lust ami found bureau In connec- 
tion with the office; a free telephone is 
also to be set up, which may be used by 
tba students at any time. Am far as 
possible, a call coming in from oiil of 
town for a student will be delivered to 
him, or he will be called to 1 he phone 
by the V. Si. C, A. service. Tbe asso- 
ciation plans to start an employment 
bureau and an information bureau, 
which will be of great service to tbe 
student body and visitors. 

Prof. Payne Is now titling up the 
office to make It aa serviceable ami rota- 
fortable aa poaalble and welcomes any- 
one who Is Interested in the work or de- 
sires to interview him. Further plans 
are to be divulged later. 



FOOTBALL SCHFPULE FOR 
NEXT FALL IS ANNOUNCED 

Seven Games Arranged by Manager 

Batcheldar. Team will be 

Built of New Material. 

Indications at present are that with 
the opening of college in September 
M. A. <*. will be represented by a varslly 
loot hall eleven In IM*. A schedule of 
seven games has been arranged, tba 
first game being with Martmouth ai 
Hanover on Oct. 12. Three new teams 
appear on the schedule, Iteiisselaer 
Polyteeh, rnlversity of Vermont and 
New Hampshire State. Tbe usual 
Hpringlield and Tufts games ara on tbe 
schedule, both eottitati baiag trlpaaway 
from home for the Agule boys, and these 
games will recall the good old ante- 
bellum days to the students. Though 
there aill lie only one veteran from tbe 
lPHJaquad in eolb-ge nest fall there Is 
some promising material avsilahle from 
1 be present soplmiuore and freshman 
elssses, and the chances for a strong 
team are goon . A each has not been 
found as yet l« soecead bead-coach 
Oore The schedule aa announced by 
Manager batcheldar is as follows: 
(id I'j. Dartmouth ai Hanover. 

19, It. P. I. at Amberei. 

18, Datf. of Vt. at Amherst. 
Nov, i, W. P. I at Worcester. 
P, N'.ll. Mate at Durham. 

18, Springfield at .Springfield. 

M, Tuffs at Medford. 



A VIVE BICORD 
The following was received from Prof, 
t S. Plumb '82 of I'mv, of Ohio. "I have 
heen a Nulweriber for all M \.<:. jour- 
nals since the first, an.l should have a 
eoiiipieie file. In fact, I have a number 
of tbe early ones bound. I wonder how 
many of tbe old grad« have kept their 
subscriptions thus lung. Vou have a \ 
g€M>d, high class college Journal." 

Former maih««afic« instructor, B. A. 
HaRelflne was recently promoted to aa 
ensign In the U. • Jfaval Reserve. 



COLLEGE VISITED BY COM- 

MITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 

The commit tea on agriculture from 
the legislature paid its annual visit to 
the college on Thursday and Friday of 
last week. While on the campus tbe 
members visited tbe various buildings 
and inspected Ihe work of tbe different 
departments. At luncheon Thursday in 
Draper Hall P ro f esso r Loekwood, Pro- 
fessor 1 henoweih and Secretary Walts 
discussed the war work of the college, 
and Prof. H, f, Thompson spoke on lb* 
market garden station, Dean hew is and 
Miss f 'ornstoek addressed the members 
in the evening on women's work, and 
Presidnet Butlerfleld gave a general 
statement of the college work. 

The committee completed its final la- 
■ peeiion ..j the campus Friday morning 
and were present at theebapele«e«iaaa 
at noon 

Senator Colburn opened the meeting 
«iil, ji fe* appropriate remarks followed 
by Representative Tarhell, chairman of 
the House Committee. I. en Smith 
spoke of the relation of the legislature 
to the college, and Representative Wil- 
son a former student at M, A. C. tepre- 
| settling Hampshire dlarriet spoke of 
women's status at f be col lege and also 
game some Interesting reminiscences, 
Representative Dunbar waa tha last 
speaker, giving some timely advice lro« 
bis experiences. 



MUSICAL CLUBS CONCERT 
AT H0LY0KE NEXT MONDAY 

At City Hall. Promises to be Well 
Attended. Dancing TJntil 1 1-30. 

Special ('far. 
The nesi eoneert and danee of the 
Musical dubs will take place next Mon- 
day night, Feb. 4lb. at H.lyoke City 
Hall, Tbe reason for having fbe affair 
on a Monday night is became of the f u» 1 
rnimg whb-h wakes Monday a holiday 
in all parts of New Kngland. Just like 
my other holiday, ft m a cause fur 
natural ill version to amusement of some 
kind In the evening. The eoneerf will 
run front 7-30 to A-HO, and dancing will 
follow until 11-*). I.asl year over a 
thousand attended the affair and fr. m 
all appearance* there will be nearly that 
many this time, There will be a special 
ear coming back from the dance si qua t- 
tcr of twelve, and atsw the regular U-iO 
car which very seldom has a large e road 
on ft, so there will I* plenty of mom for 
all who wish to take in the affair I ha 
tickets will lie onlySl rents, which sum 
Includes both the concert and dance. 



Winter weather has made outdoor 
drill an impossibility at Columbia. 
Military work will hereafter be limited 
to mapmaking and other imbioT work, 
unless the use of an armory can be 
obtained. 




•1 



!♦<*"> 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor*! note: In this column will be 
published weekly, lei ten or extracts 
from letters from the Au^ie men at the 
front.] 

Somewhere on Christmas, 1917. 



<1 wit h the trucks and 

corporal in charge of 

be regiment'* work lies 



I am connect* 

lllololi S I'll'-, am 

■even * 1 1 i yen, I 
in taking ammunition up to the trenches 
— also food, supplies, etc. They go right 
Up to the trenches, and I lit- men on the 
tractors at ufgbl have no enviable job, 
believe me, as the exhaust from their 
gas tractors give their location away 
and make them often t he target of ma- 
chine. unin lire. 

For the past month I have been with 
the Mrs! battalion, bat while up at the 
Other camp had mote of a chance to yet 
around. Have been up in the front line, 
viewed No Man's land, etc, seen ami 
been in over a mile of the lliudenhurg 
tunnel. These tunnels are wonders and 
regiments oi men can live in them. 
They arc lighted l>> electricity, and the 
air from the numerous entrance* make 
them fairly comfortable. Trench war- 
fare is hard in realise until one real I > 
■eciilbe lu-uches. The trenches where 
I was were all captured from Frits?. In 
tin- «.ec(Uid line and I lie supports there 
were many of the fatuous concrete de 
fences <>1 ibe Ijertnans now torn hj 
beav) shell ine. The concrete was about 
e ; uhiceii incite- thick and re ill forced by 
iron rail*. In ..tic plate a gap led from 
the front line trenches, ami the four ol 
us crawled on i.ttt stomachs through a 
shallow i tench and viewed the remains 
of all t.cittiHii» that were blown up by a 
hiiinti when the ttetii lies were captured, 
.his! back ol the lines was the battered 
remain* ot a Frtu aeroplane, driven 
ilow.i tiy ,»tiii a n tatt lire. 

today Christmas we bad turkey 
atid 111,1*1 of the tiMiik'* .s,iuie leed ami 
s.inie change ir..m ..nr dally feed, be. 
iitvr me. We had a snowy day. which 
made i hiUiuia* an real as pmalbll un- 
der i-oiiiiliioiis here, In fact, it was 
really i tij.iy aide. 

and all the good wishes I 
can Send ymi, 

t'tlii'iiiiM, \l A<< L. I'otD *IU, 
V,». Kuglncets on Active Service, 

m 



soldiers as their comrades rather than 
as their men. Tbey all have been 
decorated for bravery. 

Captain Masieau told that his whole 
regiment was called, armed, equipped 
ami on their way to the front in five 
days. Of course they were all trained 
men in reserve. Every Frenchman who 
has had military training — they all have 
it - has a book which telU exactly what 
to do when war is declared. 

The French put in threeUyears in 
active service, in times of peace, twelve 
years in the reserves, then twelve years 
in the territorials. 

Major UeMontal, one of the officers 
who lectured, led us in the singing of 
La Marseillaise, In a manner which 
would put the average American college 
cheer leader to shame. Tbege French 
officers are certainly inspiring. 

Madam Marguerita Silva, the grand 
opera singer, sang several French songs 
last week. Her husband, Captain Smith 
of the American Marines, an aviatur 
who has How u over the German lines, 
nays tbat it is very essential to know 
French. 

The American college student can not 
learn anything which will not be useful 
to him in the army. The more be 
knows the quicker he will rise. lam 
still a buck private: moral, you can't 
saw wood with a hammer, 

I think this very thing should be Id- 
pressed on the students. It is hard to 
realize t here is a sugar shortage until 
your own best girl turns sour on you. 

It certainly seems good to see the old 
paper and 1 read every word almost as 
many limes as I did when correcting 
proof at the office. 

Laal nigbl I met Mrs. Qroaveoor, the 
wife of an Amherst college professor. I 
meet many Massachusetts people here, 
bat have not run serosa anyone from 
Aggie yet. 

The people of Washington are very 
hospitable sad we are certainaly enjoy- 
ing life here. Letters are slwsy wel- 
eoiue. 

Fesm J. Bwm "1*. 
fi K Street. H. 1. 
Washington. I), C. 

[Editor's note -The above letter from 
a former Om.i.naiax man Is especially 
interesting from the fact that emphasis 
cannot be too strongly laid upon Ibe 
need of becoming trained collegiaiely.] 



We certainly do mil make the most of 
our lime while In college, The average 
student sfmh immi ,.f bis spare time 
(the tiiiie not »|tfni In Ibe eiaM room or 
In ratlnu di><-u<o>tng what we are going 
in do fo 1 lift*, what we should have 
done >.. 1 uti*. Im« *i are going to go to 
Hip From without pawning the family 
Ii*-irl«*»m« and other such Important 
Matters uo which the destiny of the 
nation li 

In my shnrt time out of college I have 
/i <! the ii. i ig« thai I missed, 

I mil wars i. •! !«*! April, there 

was nothing I dbdSkrd more than drill 
anil there was nothing for wbfeb 1 
thought I would have !«■■ uaej bat noa 
there ia very I'tHle mure tucful, 

(think {hat tin* men will do well to 
iijiih ■fad] their Preach. I have met 
several man and oflirera who have been 

"in. -x I !.i i. ami liiey all eiiiji|ta««ae tbf> 

valtit of a kMrwurdge of Frenrh. I am 
(.tiiiijlitB it >ngu ige three night* a 

week 

U; : ■ , nights I attend a French 
(■ell) •' the Unitarian church, 

Ttifte in. ii.ti. t*.if the Fr»Bch High Com- 

in » liirn who have MSN service 

at i iff !»•«■: tiled there, Tbey 

are all < ind -p«*ak of the French 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Fudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN HALL 



H. L. KI'MKU.. Mar., Ms 

K. M, HI m M, MB 



R. B. COLLIN'S. Mi 

r. k cols, -m 



M. A. C. STORE 

Basement of North Dormitory 



SPRINGFIELD FALLS BEFORE 
M. A. C. PUCK SHOOTERS 

Bard Fought Conteat Marked By 

Team-work. T. M . 0. A. Stages 

A Flea Comeback. Score 6 to 4 . 

The M ,\ . C varsity hockey learn de- 
feated the Kprlnsfield Y. M. C. A. eeven 
on the Prall field rink at Springfield lam 
Tuendny in a bard fought contest l.y the 
score of 6 to 4, The light fall id itm* 
prevented a flat pasting game and indl- 
vidnal work wm mora or less the it vie, 
bat ihroimhoiit the same n Hie eablbl- 
tion of offensive work wan noticeable 
on both sides, Short panes with 
lung shots from tbe Matarof the rink 
were frequent and most of the eeorlag 
waa done after following in ea the long 
-hot*. The team* were pretty well on a 
par,rmt the Training School goal tt nder 
could not stop everything and the 
Mamon and While took advantage of 
t hi* weak ne»» by bombarding si* I allies 
through bis defame, 

Springfield scored first oa a abort pa»« 
from Markley to Bulhta who nailed the 
rubber with It if le difficulty hot less than 
a infante later M, A, C tied It up aad 
took a lead which deve lo p e d fata a 4 to 

3 -i ore at half t i me. 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 

Sweaters, Athletic Suppliesand Drill Shoes 



I I W I I - I •« — 

The E. E. Millett Estate 



A fall line of ntftaaa 




wUi roa watt 
Airtnerat. ntaaa, 



E.B. DICKINSON,DJ).S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst. Masa, 

Office Hmrrff t to Ha. ■„ lat t« i p. •• 



STUDENTS 

Before going home for the holiday s 

D0*»T MtWdll 

to take with yon to mother, sister or 
a weet heart 

A Box of Those Dainty Flowers 

fMwwa an the r»mim», 

Dept. ot Floriculture 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH ? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of fire 

Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



The **Nonotxick w 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 



RATES, $1.50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
— Proma— 0«r Specialty, 



. J. 



H 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



The second period was fast and furious 
for between the halves the rink had 
been cleared ofl aod tbe Blue aarf White, 
in a few minutes had st-.netl two more 
point* bat the last (real was protested 

by M. A. U. because the net fell over, 
while Leavitt sent the Agjrle score up 
another notes. A tew teeoad* later 
McKelvey drove a fast one past Faxon 
from the face off. The remaining eight 
minutes of the period were lively ones, 
both teams playing on even terms, tarry- 
ing tbe sphere from one end of the rink 
tu tbe other until Redding put II, A. C. 
two points ahead just a minute before 
the tinal whistle blew. Springfield pro- 
tested this score «»n the grounds ibai 

it was an off side shot, but the referee 
ruled it a goal. 

The game was featured by brilliant 
all-round work tor SI, A. < • with Bedd- 
ing and Leavitt eredited with two tallies 
each while Markley played well tor 
Springfield until forced to retire with a 
-evere gash in his left leg. 

The line-up: 

m. A. C 
Faxon, g 
Smith, p 

('rafts, ep 
Cbisholm, r 
bedding, c 
Leavitt, Iw 
MH'arlhy, rw 



SI'ltlNOFlKI.n. 

g, Peek ham 

p, Hodge 

tp, Davis 

r. Fink 

e, Sullen 

lw, Marklej 

rw, McKelvey 



Score— M. A. C. fl, Springfield ft. Sub- 
stitutions— N'oren for Markley. Goals 
icoredby Beddlngl. Leavitt S.Cblsbolm, 
McCarthy, Sullen '2. Fink. MeKelvey. 
Time— 15 and 20miuute periods. 



TOTAL NUMBER OF M. A. C. 
MEN IN SERVICE NOW 429 

A revised list by classes of graduates 
and former students of the college mm 
ia the service of the country has bean 
compiled and published. There t- I 
total now of «t» men up to January S», 
of whom US are commissioned other- 
and 56 of tbe total are overseas in vari 
om branches of work. On Nov. '2*, 1*17, 
there were M8 Aggie men in service, 
The third training camps bave taken a 
large numlH-rof the men and many more 
have gone into aviation si nee < hristmas. 
By Classea the totals are: 
Cow 



INTERCLASS GAMES GO TO 
SOPHS AND UNCLASSIFIEDS 

Seniors Put Up Stiff Fight in Medi- 
ocre Oame. Juniors Unable to 
Keep Up Pace. 
The second panics of the interclass 
basketball series, played la the armory 
Saturday afternoon, were fast and 

closely contested, the unclassified team 
defeating the seniors 14-* in the first 

game, and ibe sophomores handing the 

juniors a 82-18 defeat in the second. 

The brand ol basketball shown was far 
superior to that displayed III I he opening 
games of the seHes< The senior live 
showed up much hetter than in their 
(its! contest. The freshman quintet did 
not play owing to the live team system, 
which necessitates a lay oil tor tine team 
each round. 

The tirst half of the unclassified-senior 
Sjame was marked by the inability of 
itoth teams to connect with tearing, 
(hough each took several shots. The 
score was U all at half lime. The seniors 
■Cored first in the second half and led 
until the middle of the period, when 
the passvrork ami ■hooting oflheun- 
classilied forwards enabled them to 
establish a live point lend, which they 
held until the end of tbe game. 
The summary : 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



ITKCf.AftRim • 
Thompson, rf 
Trillson, If 
Fox, c 

Hanson, rg 

\ tistiu, ig 



una. 

Ig, Mower 

rg, Boyd 

c, tiowen 

rf, Emmerich 

if. i'opi' 



r 



Scbillatc's StuMo 

86 /l>am St., 

H o r t b a m p t o n 




I'M'.. 

tela 
1W17 

1818 
1015 
JM4 
IBIS 

r.'i-j 

r.'H 

1910 

100V 

1908 

1907 

1908 

lew 

it 

u 

1897 
1898 
MM 
UM 

1SB1 



T«ul fa 
t*er\lre 

H 

48 



IBM 

1S7H 



i 

3 
S 
4 
S 

s 
1 
I 
I 

3 

I 
1 

4 
1 

f 
1 
1 



Total* 4§9 



1 

4 

n 

90 

8 
7 
9 
IS 
1 
S 
3 
S 

i 
s 

i 
l 

i 
I 
s 



i 

i 
i 

118 



Hanker 

(tin 

8 

8 
13 
10 

S 

I 

s 

4 
8 

S 



.score Unclassified, 14; 1918, ». Su, »- 
stitiitioti* lut*. Chapman tor Popp 

Uoals ftom tl Thooipann 8, Trillson 

i, fox. UaaaoKi Emaaariea t, Bowaa, 
u'oals troiu fouls ihoiiipKon t, Howes 
■>, loti'i. missed Tbosaneoa 4. Howes 

4. Helerce Met ;itlli> ..I M \ I 

iimer— lloldcn ol M I < • T>n»e M 
minute halves, 

The sophomore junior game waa a 
whirlwind from start to tim-di. The 
clever passing- and bo«hJ defensive work 
of Ibe sophoraore Iv» romlted In their 
H.-*|uirtHg a u«s«d lea.l In tha first few 
mitiiile*. The juniors did not wore 
I n.nt the il«s«r duriiw tbe fiiai half, Ihe 
■eore slaiidluu 13 hi « in lavor of the 
lower classmen at the end of the first 
pariod. Iliith teams hn.kc even in tbe 
tid half, each storing ten points, 
j'hc shooting ol Medmanand the stellar 
dviemdve w,«rk of the hacks featured for 
IW0, while ( n.we escelled for 1H1M 

The sBmmarj : 

IHltt. 



JACKSON & OUTLEB 



---DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



la, Haker 

rm, Williams 

c, French 

rf, Vtck^rs 

if, i n>w« 



STODENTS TAKING UP 

Wi^R SAVINGS STAMPS 

The War Savinas stnmp Mile under 
the impetus id «h«« wide a« 
committee ha* resulted u o>e 
afampB helaa p*»Id the u r -i 
Aacneiaaan mha placed In s*e 
Ibk on the eaaspue, a stenotrt 
each huilding to have aetoal 
her band*. The placing <>i MP 

lha AgH'e l»u »"*' lo " ( - 
conwtderari.in. Kturta "• " 
■1». to induce the ciclical Siafl .-■ ' " 
pioyw, ol fbe college to take up *Hfi 
the prop^ition. 



1(^, 
stedmaB, rf 
Hall, II 
lavlt.r.e 
Ijiilelield, Ig 
ilrrmaB.rg 

?M„fe iri#», H: 1P1*». ». »•!.-.. i. • 
i on- 1919, White lot Hsker. tw.-ii* 
tr tu ti.«.i- *>!• on. soi «1. I iij lor 4, Hall, 
I niwc 4 <,.«* it on fiititit irowe i, 
Vtckerx S. Konls aalased Italia. ( n.we 
5 Vkkers. Helerce McCarthy of M. 
\ i Timer Hidden ..i M i.C, Tima 
-#J rnitiUie halvM, 



week 

I. nil. I 



je« lit 



M. A. C. DANCE AT HA 
WELL ATTENDED. ONE FEB, 6 

The daner gitae bf Mi-» I'arkerat the 
Mapoaic Hal). \..t«h:.tt.|ton. w«» snch ;* 
Kuccfse mat Wad t r etda y Mijiht that th»ra 

will h« aatUher one Kch. Hth. AlM.ttt 
iorty men aetit «»ver to support lea 
urchaUta, and ail ct,j,.yed ibeniaalve* to 
, beatra ««« hi n» 



it ttii 



i» tU'V 



t M \ « 



The 
beat, aad iumished etei 
tt, ; ,it tbcj did at the 1m«i '"" 
H.ar in niln* 
which i« epmlag 
want a «•«»! U 
acauslntcd with 
thai are alway« there, 



REMEMBER 



YOU WILL AX-WAYS T\Sl) 



The Best in Materials and Manufacture 



NO MATTER WHAT YOt NEED 



IN THE LINE OF CLOTHES 



At the Lowest Prices 



I 



•AT 



« I immte 



Hill. 



I.ttt 



i in- »ith. ««<t ii you 

i«. wu OVM and KCt 

M.tne ot ibe alee Kirlu 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Hart ichaffner & Marx Clot I 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



I 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
MARSHALL O. LANPHEAR MB.Edltor-ln-Ctalef 



Absociatk Editors. 

ARTHUR N. HDWKN 'la 

ELIOT M. BIKKIJM '19 

ARTHl'K L, (HANDLER *19 

MYRTOS F. EVANS 19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
SAMUEL R. FERRISS *1». Business Manager 

(i. M. < \ MI'I'.KI.I .■.!'. AsailUnt Manager 

JAMES C. MAIM.KS '20. Advertising Manager 
O. ALFRED SMITH '20. Orcalatton 



Subscription »2.0Q per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In ease of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as aecond-claaa matter at t lie A mherst 
Post Offlc*. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, J*». 29. N*. 14 

la it Worth WhileP 
Announcement has been made that 
the college year 191H-'19 will be of 
thirty weeks duration, divided into 
three ten week terms. We cannot "see" 
this at all, supposedly it is dooe that 
the Aggie men may serve their country 
.hi the farms and thus help Increase 
production. This is certainly a worthy 
and noble aim, hut will they not, in the 
end, serve their country far better If 
they get the largest amount possible of 
education now, when educated men in 
all lines are. and will be, so much 
seeded. We believe so sincerely. It 
has been said that the men who are 
liable to draft should b« enabled to 
complete their education as quickly as 
possible la order thai they may he of 
greater service when they come hack 
from "over there." We think other* 
wise. A nan tn the present senior 
class wanted to lake advanced work at 
another university when he had eoin- 
pleted his work here; and though not 
well supplied with money, figured that 
he could graduate this year because It 
was to be short and thus lean expensive. 
Be started his senior year, hut after 
correspondence with the authorities of 
the university he decided to attend, be 
was informed that extra work would be 
necessary before he could enter. In 
other words, though credited here with 
a college education, these Other men 
did not feel that he had enough knowl* 
edge to warrant his going on, because 
of the work he had lent last spring and 
this year. That man left college lo 
earn enough to carry him through a 
full year at a future date, There are 
men In the Junior class who are plan* 
ning to fake advance work In their 
lines after graduation. Will they nut, 
in ail probability. Hnd themselves in the 
tame position, and what remedy did 
they have? 

Between lent spring and this year, 
we have lost work that we will have 
much dificully in making up under 
this "speeding np M regime. If we can 
make it up at all. This year, with nine 
week terms, even with very hard work, 
we do not gel what we should from our 
courses. In other words we are getting 
our credits for our degrees, but are not 
by any means getting the knowledge 
that those degrees should represent. 
It can hardly be better next year with 
ten-week terms. It will be much the 
tame m this year: get well started in 



the course, become really interested in 
it and in the professor, and before half 
we want is given us the term is over, 
and we start something else. This sys- 
tem is not satisfactory to many of the 
students, and we do not believe it is to 
the professors. 

If, next year, the terra muBt be short- 
ened, let us at least go back to the old 
semester plan, which was more satisfac- 
tory to all except those most interested 
in the short course. We would then at 
least get two terms of fifteen weeks 
each, and would get something mure 
than a superficial knowledge of the 
courses we do take up. k. m. k. 

CAMPUS NOTES 

This week end will be ended by the 
term's "Dean's Saturday." 

Verne A.Fogg '19 of Topsfield has 
pledged Kappa Gamma Phi. 

"Bill" Wheeler '19 is suffering with 
water on the knee, caused by a fall. 

Lee W. Burton '19 passed his aviation 
entrance examinations last week and 
now awaits his call to a ground sch o ol . 

Dr. Stanley C Hill, instructor in 
zoology, has been initiated into honor- 
ary membership of Alpha (.annua Kho. 

All local train service between North- 
ampton and Springfield except the 9-00 
a. m. train will be discontinued on 
Garfield Mondays. 

John I. liyard, superintendent of the 
apiary, has resigned on account of ill 
health. He will remove to bis former 
home in Soutbboro. 

The Northampton Hoard of Trade, 
which last spring "went In" with the 
farmers.in the hill towns raising pota- 
toes on the '>•-"<> basis, lost $8000 on the 
venture. 

Sandy MaeKlmmle, 11 year old son of 
Professor A, A, MacKlmmie, gained no 
little fame by bringing In il new mem- 
bers to the Red Cross, recent ly . Among 
them wm bis father, 

James P. Davies '19, Private In 
Depot Company P. Signal Corps, U.S. 
A., Is editor-in-chief of "Alienating 
Currents", a page In the Vermont Cynic 
devoted to the company. 

There will he a representative of the 
Emergency Fleet Cor [Miration on the 
campus shortly to confer with Aggie 
nan concerning government work at 
their Philadelphia plant. 

Students In rural engineering S9 have 
done all the work la Installing two aew 
forges for use in the courses. Different 
pieces of the college farm machinery 
are being overhauled by the men also, 

The junta* class has postponed Its 
Junior supper on Wednesday night. To 
its place will be held a class meeting in 
I. B D at 7-15 for the election of elate 
officers and discussion of the Iwlff snd 
Junior dance, 

Bloated magnates typifies the H. O 
T. C. men who last week received their 
tfst quarterly payment from the gov- 
ernment. Each man received approxi- 
mately *3i» for the military work lor the 
three months ending Jan, 1, 

Professor George K. F. Storey, form- 
erly of M. A. C„ later of the University 
of Vermont, and head of Ike Industrial 
Hureu.ii of Vermont, was recently 
elected manager of the Worcester 
< oiinty Farm Bureau. 

Than Is a report that as part of an 
emergency war program, Mount Hoi- 
yoke girls will be given work In mm' 
munlty organisation and leadership at 
M A, C, directly after their closing In 
June in connection with Intensive can- 
ning, preservation, evaporation and 
utilization of food products. 



NOTICE ! 



Men leaving college and men chang- 
ing their address should notify the 
office immediately if they wish to 
receive the COLLEGIAN. 




MIXTURE 



The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. P. M. is mild, fragrant slow burning, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGUE 

THAT'S WHY IT'S PERFECT 



t-ot. Can 

t m in. 
*-o*. fan 
tan 



IS ranti 
SO rent* 
*M Cent* 
$1.80 



It Is ABSOLUTELY THE 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PRODUCED 



MiiimfiM -in 1 1 >i by 

COBB, BATES & YERX A CO., Boston, USA. 




I t's a long face that knows no 
.smiling. 

Pshaw, man, let's have it back 
and get your money. 

If underwear doetn't fit we 
ought never to have sold it. 

Of course, if you didn't buy it 
from us, then the remedy is to 
come to us. 

Everything college men wear, 
including unifurmi. 



THE DE LAVAL 
AWEVNER! 

Why don't you let it 
win for you? 



iMMfMe 

award »»■ »l*«n tan lt» I jir»l at t rn> fag, 
ama-fartflr R»noMtion In ietft, a« akm at 
Htiffalo, ralraco. i»t i eatl l"aria. It maa* la. 
and alt the cnat world cxinaltktM far man 
than m fears, 

And at everf enflt Ptition of the National 
Battennaken* Awn.«i«tion. butter mad* 
from c rmn separated 
l»» I *»■ (aval Separatim 



Rogers Pert Compart 

r o ad ea r 

INnw 



st ISthSO 



atMth At 



Hioadwsf 

at Warren 



NSW YORK CITY 



Klfth A»* 
St 4IM St, 




a INI rwcifd, which 
iinlt iitiii,iitil ■tarn 
has mad* f ' Mlb lr 

Tfea sn p f rtorl tf of 
f>* Laval Pvparstors 
and of 1st (aval t*»»- 
d*Md rrwun la M 
ionif»rnueatiaH#d, It 
it aa accented fact, 



THE K LAVAL SEPARATOR 



MB4K»AI«WAV 
REW YORK 



>K. MAfttSRSfJT. 

rHirano 



Northa mpton Players 
iSi= "A PAIR OF QUEENS" 



CONDITION EXAMINATION 
SCHEDULE 

Fbiuay, Fkhkiauv 1 
l-:i0 p. m. 

Pbysici 25 
3-30 p. M. 

Physics Lab 

.Sati'huay, Fkiiiipakv 'I 
7-30 a. M. 

Freshman and Sophomore 1'ivmh 

and (German 
Chemistry 4 
KngHsh 1 

Freshman Agriculture and Horti- 
culture 
9-80 A. m. 

Botany 60 
Algebra 
English •>'> 

Tactics 25 

' Examinations in any subject not 
scheduled above must be arranged by 
appointment with the instructor in 
enure* of that subject . 



VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 
OPPOSES STEVENS FRIDAY 

In Drill Hall. Visitors Have Won 

Six Straight Game*. Clever on 

Defense. Defeated Dartmouth. 



The varsity basketball team will take 
on the fast Stevens Institute five Friday 
evening In the armory. The New Jer- 
aey quintet has won six straight games, 
and will *NM to M, \. C, bent on keep- 
ing their slate clean, Stevens defeated 
Dartmouth, early in the season, 29 to 
10; the clever defensive work and rapid 
passwork of the Hulmken boys proving 
too much for the tireen live to fathom, 
Kgger, who played left forward, is 
clever at locating the basket, and has 
aeefed moat of Steven* point* this sea- 
ton, while Carlton Is a shifty center and 
a coBakrteot sourer from the foul tine, 
having act up a record of 1M baskets 
from free tries in m recent game, I -a 
l'olnle, at right guard, ha* ahown abil- 
ily in covering his man. 

The Aggie quintet will !«• out tu 
annea a victory befure leaving to play 
Dartmouth Saturday, al Hanover, and 
after Iwo weeks of stiff practice should 
he in shape to make the going tough 
for the Bed and Gray eombloMloii. 
The lineup: 



RELAY TEAM GOES TO BOSTON 
SATURDAY FOR B.A.A. MEET 

The relay team journeys to Beaton 
Saturday, to run New Hampshire State 
college at the 1$. A. A. meet. Captain 
Yesair and four men, Manager Maltoon 
ami Coach Dickinson will make the 
trip. Beyond Vesair, the team has not 
yet been picked, aa there 1* smiic very 
good material nut, and the competition 
is keen for positions. Although this 
will he their first taee the M. A. C. 
team feels it has an excellent chance to 
win out, and is BOW Working hard at 
putting on the liuishing umehes. 

Arrangements are under way tt»r a 
race at Ayer agalnai one©! the Camp 

Devens teams on Feb. 27, and this 
should make a good eonlest for the 
&ggifl boy*, although the race is not a 
settled thing, the Camp lievcns author- 
ities seem very much in lavm of it. 
The New Hampshire baton carrici* 

have been training wo the past two 

weeks on the h\eter track which hi 
near Durham and although the* have 
loM several promising candidates t he> 

apparently have t fast combination. 
M the first time trials last week. 
u'Lcary a aopbotnor* eoYerad thedla- 
tHtiee of 890 yards in 4H 8-5 seconds 
time which is considered very well. 
The times of the others ranged from gfj 
(O *,3 seconds. I'hey have a fast mail 'n 
Nightiiigale who ii New Hampshire's 
star bag distance runner but ju*i what 
bis abilities arc on the boards is a ques- 
tion. Last year the lilue and White 
made the distance of 1600 yards in :i 
minutes ami 1* seconds while M \ <. 
was a second slower against W. I'. I. 
This year's trial times are not known but 
with several prumisiim h>wer classmen 

out there should be developed a ipeedy 
quart ei, 



THE AIM 



After twenty-five years close business association with the best dressed 
men in your college : _ 

To keep our lines of young men's togs so utterly smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy here, knowing that we're specialists of twenty- 
five years' experience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually smart "trench " overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coat made, 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50— $6.00 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's Block, .... Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



" BIDE-A-WEE 



»» 



■tvvkm* nr*TTrt"rK 
Keaenhener, rf 

Ewer, " 
Carlson, c 
La Potnte, ra 
Headden, l K 



M. A. C . 

)(, teat 

ra, Parkhnrsl 

e, U'hitt ie 

If, Harrington 

rt, MeCarthy 



FIRST INTERCL ASS RELAY 

RACIS NEXT MONDAY 

The first of the anavaJ tntewlaw relay 
race* will he rma Mn^r afternoon 
when the aopfaomorea line up with the 
aneJaaatied men at 4 « and the jitaton 
■garnet She freahmen at 4-W Thews wilt 
he two lapracea and any rnan Bert har* 
in« a varaJiy track letter it elliUde i« 
ran for hli claaa whleh ■honld mma 
that »aar "dark horeee" wtH be w- 
eovwed ae aiwwa by the mnilii>»r the 
interfratewHr race Uwea, Thf r**i«« 
will eoant as fart of th» total mb#m <i 
the annaal Iitewlaw ind.*»r f rark meet 
which will b* held .sat urda>. Mar, », t* 
Managen have \mtn etaclad hy p«'b 
Llaitm and the iirganlaailon and practice 
»f the teami will be fatahed hy the end 
at the wwk, 

M ,*j(i,,f„«t,,„y u at K.-ii l^aven- 
wartb training f«.r a .•,.mnii«N.n In lha 
artillery. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The w<»rk uf tin- »«iiii|i»tiioTi for edi- 
tolial fMwhiottH nn the Coi.i.kuiam ha» 
been credited in cooawtlea with 
I'mfeaur Neal «»f the journal inm depart- 
ment (hrmigh the week ending January 
CiedPa have been baaed «>n eefj 
and office work with special credit given 
i„r letter* nei'iirwl frum men In wr- 
vlee. There are ail upeninge on the 
board, huc junior, three lophifail 
and twofteihnian. Tube elegilde h.r 
elerfton each competitor will be t«- 
quired to have a minimum $i twemy- 
flre eredlti and a two third* vote in nee- 
caaary firf el^Ion t» the lM»arfl In tin- 
Ural week of March by the nembera of 
the C«i,!,k»ma» th*n holding ntim. 
Competition end* March I. The ►land- 
ing of Hie rumiTflloW: 
K. I*. J one*, *W 
O. M, Bcwrdwan. *W 
(;, W. tlunkar, *m 
H U, fie,r, *W 
g» fJ, rreirton, *Si 
W. K. Freneh, T# 
U P. Martin, *» 
p, B, Brown. H 
M. It. IlaUeii, -£\ 
W. i, Palmer, -i\ 



Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

Our SpechdM And other go..a tiling* t« eat. 

MRS. L. M. 5TKBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Maa*. 

Tel. 415-W 

The Highland Hotel 

furner <rt IIIHi»»n »nd IUiin-1 Klrept*. llm-»' 
blmkii from Ifce I "I"" |)h|ni(. t« » iniMlprn »m*- 
iHry rnnon Ihr Kur"|«»«ti I'tan. It t« J««l » »tep 
frum M*itiH!ri-ft.awm» rrom tho iwhie »nilduit. 
iintt »fl In the i-eiiHi of the tHinlne** dhilrtrt. 

It, r....n - me writ fuftilnheitllBdrOWfotMihle. 
twvlnii t t«-lr|!!n>in- mill but » rut mid nirinlnir 
w:,!*"! Inavaryraow. I*rten$l and ni»; rmmii 
wllh lLHlii.tinjIftI.Mand «l». 

It* exi-elletit <ut*lt>e and will vrnltlated din- 
Itig ii... in BiakM ■> ine;»l i ideHMltt niflmirv— 
,^,.,, I i,m • '■ bUthett awilrtr, w»ll eaaked 
ami nerird In tlip Ih-«( |H»w.llile mm mt ■■ 

HU| al the Hlehtand Hotel «me and »«.u will 
■ nttrlpate *t»rlng there »«i»ln Munle eveij 
evening. 

D. H. Sievers, 

riUMaatf Malal. $»rti»*n»la. Man. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Nest to ('ampiun'a 

JOHN FOTIS, PR8*. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Book* I ountain P*JM 

Aseata for lie » Tvpewritar 

P. M. CURRAN C. P. DYER 



Xft.fl 
I8.T 

m.ft 

UJ 

».w 
•4 
a,fl 
A,l 
i.T 




RAHAR'S INN 



S.,tttv«ltJ|<l(»!. 

wmmumnm 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

ty Main Strt«t, Maionii HuiliJing, 
Northampton, h\i*s 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RIN1S AND CARPETS 

- B. I» MARHM BTTATK - 



S i i i-i 1 1 n Lane Foi.arir. (km. 

M»,inr*iTi!HiNci jnrMuun 
IWIIIMIMUWAY, NKW YOKK 

t'l.llt AND OQULtWnM 
II NH AND RIIfQ* *» 
I, lait.vNM AtVD 



DR. GEO. A. HAS WELL 

0**t«30f>«ltt-k 



7H Main HI, 
aa t » • i > t . . ■ • . 



S. S. HYDE 

J.-NV • ■•■■ ..'•> « l| .1 .."•••• 1 



tW'«tl»t»" I" 

Are»t»t« 

ln B 



la ftaaaant «f« 

if il|.it«.fm Ktnari. Hmhen I 

i«i1 tin* Watch R#f»t»"- 
riMptlj and *«Mlfy!!j IHine, 
ittafartlnn *.ii»t»«tee*. 



I. p^jtrrrr F^t^t»*tterr» 

OBOYSDAL1 INN 

■OtfyMitAIiLSY. «*« 
lunrheons.Anernoon Tea*. 

fj.Klit i «.*«!■ to m*r, 

y*t. aaaw 



Cht^ mh frflm / A, M. to 4 A. M. 

The Holyoke Valve ft Hydrant Co. 

Jtihlwr* «f WinuBht Ira* »nd llra*ia t*lr» 
%'alvia »nd Uttlngp ft*r WmB, Wute? mm4 

I,,. ^.tu-.tcMi «n,l M»«r«»-»m H«dt«»f and Hpe 
t ..■ .-ilf.^a.ritw 1 »i* »'•?•»■■■■ t' MHI^ni'pHaa. 
I ,,<if,«.»>r« and • riuit»«t..r» fnr IMMiin a«il 
Hrtt Water lte»ttn«, Ant««»tte UpHnklff 
j*j«inii». Botler mni Bnrtne I'wwrtbM. 



PLTMOU^INN 

Northampton 

Qyiet and Com fortabto—E very 
ftcifity for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

maa 



I U I • ITUU I 



Agricultural Books 
-1- Filing Cases -- 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 



iting Paper 

w'iW I^atlWwtaf# WV wWffwa^* ae^^l# 

All klndanf 



A. J. HASTINGS 




1 

i 



■**' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



THE DINING HALL 

is offering most attractive board 
to the student body. 

The get-together, songs and 
college life, and good times een- 
ler about the dining hall. 

The calbtL-ria offers a-la-carte 
service. 

The main dining room serves 
monthly board. 



Drop in at 

"YE AGGIE INN" 



Board by weeK or al-a- 

85.50 



RECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** HAMP »• 

COTTAGE CHEESE 

in richer in protein than most meats 
ami is very much cheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 

Also try our fancy cheese: 

Neufchatel Pimento 

Olive Club 

All products made from pasteur- 
ized milk and cream . 



Candy, Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



Run for Aggie Men 

By Aggie Men 



H E. SPAULOING '19, Manager 



Dairy Department 

Mans. Agricultural College, 

Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst. Mass. 

Olhee Haws; 1-3, 7-# j>. m. .Sunday and 
• •ilier hours by appointment. 



There »« iif *t I k»4 K«i*o*whny you should 
bay you 



COLLEGE LOSES PROMINENT 

ALUMNUS BY DEATH 

Joseph F. Barrett '75 Passes Away 

During Last Week. Connected 

With Mr. Bowker. 

Word has been received during the 
pagt week of the death of Joseph F. 
Barrett ! 75. Mr. Barrett was born in 
Miiire, Oct. 7, 1H54 and graduated from 
this college when only 21. Prominent 
classmates of his were William P. 
Brooks, director of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Kxperiment Station; Peter 
M. Ilarwood, Mass. Dairy Commission; 
J. W, Winchester, veterinarian, Law- 
rence and George M. Miles, bank Fresi- 
<lent. Miles City, Mont. Mr. Uarrett 
taught for a year after leaving college 
ami then entered the milk business in 
Chicago. Since 1<77 he has been with 
the Bowker Fertilizer Co, in New York. 
He was married Oct. 89. 1888 and again 
Dec. -*n, 100S and is sur\ived by a wife 
ami three daughters. While in college 
he was one of the founders of the Phi 
Sigma Kappa fraternity. He is the 
fourth of the six fottitdl rs to die. For 
the past 25 years he ha> been one of the 
closest councillors and most respected 
leaders of that fraternity. He was a 
member Phi Kappa Phi. 



COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk i!mwi» tuwli ami irflltrnn ■|»|M»ti!«-. 
litre t« where juii find lit* plea moiber makes, 

Qood Service and Reasonable Prices 



School and College Photographers . . 




L.OOALLY: *>"* Center St.. Northampton Matt.. 

Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS \M) POULTRY l>RI>NFHS 
WrfOI.K*ALK nstv 




Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Mama, Bacon, 
Poultry* (lame, Butter, Cheese, 
Ens, Ottve Oils. 



Blaekiiione, North and North t nitre streets, 
BOSTON, .... flASS, 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Mat Go. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 

fBtTABl.tSIiRIi IjU,. 



vZSSZ* EMPIRE 



TS 



C&rp?tvt«r St Morehousf, 

PRINTERS, 



On the contrary, the war has brought 
the idea to many of us that we are here 
for a purpose, and that idea is driving 
ub on to do our best work an', to in- 
crease our efforts to get the most out of 
our studies. 

Edward S. Faukk '20. 



HOCKEY TEAM LEAVES 

FRIDAY FOR WEST POINT 



No i» Cook Place, 



Amher st, Ma» 



COMMUNICATION 

In the Coi.i.hhas of Jan. 8, there 
appeared an editorial that has caused 
considerable comment and righteous in- 
dignation on the campus. The writer 
of the editorial slates, at some 
length, that (he sin. lent body Is going 
to the dogs, in regards to studies, and 
that Interest in the work is sadly Uck 
Ing, Since reading thai editorial I have 
wondered where the author of that 
famous artkle obtained the information 
on which he based his statements. 1 
have recently made special effort to 
notice what ironps of students have 
been discussing and I an sure that 1 
bare discovered no unusual prevalence 
of, "Idle con vernal ion, swapping stories, 
dlscnselng the bad points of I be other 
fellow, the pejorff) way the college was 
run, etc," 

My observations bare indicated thai 
the topics of conversation, tbis year, 
are not of an especially light nature. 
In the main they bare been, first the 
war; second, studies; and third, the 
draft. Don't misunderstand me by in- 
feting that (he light side of the eon- 
vrr*at Ion baa been dropped and that the 
students cease to knock the faculty 
beean*e such an Inference would be In- 
correct, College students have always 
bad their light side of conversation and 
have always knocked the professon and 
the administration, and college students 
will always swap stories and discuss 
the professora and executives of their 
Institution, 

The small percentage of students who 
hare flunked out ibis fall and the large 
percentage of juniors and seniors who 
have elected difficult courses would 
■rem to indicate that some of the itate- 
nienitt made la that editorial are er- 
roneous. The fewness of the "Dfcskey" 
parties and midnight poker games would 
seem to indicate that a ■«ml»cr arid 
earnest atmosphere prevails on the cam- 
pus, I have heard seniors mention, 
more than once, that all the high life 
has left college and that all the boys 
do this year Is stndy. 

A ggle la not retrograding 1 n any sense 
"of the wort. The {Merest of the stn- 
denl body in their work ia not roceeding. 



Prospects Bright for Another Victory. 

Army Has Lost Three Straight 

Games. Defeated by Williams 

The varsity hockey team leaves Fri- 
day night for West Point, where they 
will line up against the Army puck 
shooters, Saturday afternoon. Eight 
players, accompanied by the manager 
and Prof. Hicks, will make the trip on 
sleepers, pulling into their Hudson 
river objective next morning. 

Little is known of the cadet septet as 
individuals, but as a team they have 
not had a very successful season so far. 
In their first practice game with the 
High School of Commerce of New York 
City, they received a defeat, and the 
Nassau Hockey Club of Princeton took 
a 2 to 1 game from them. Last Satur- 
day Williams nosed out a 3 to 2 victory 
in a tight game. 

Oliphant, of gridiron fame, seeme to 
he the star of the team, playing an ag- 
gresive and fast game at point, while 
Bo>d at center manages to give some 
trouble by clever skating. In the past 
West Point baa always put up a tine 
contest against M. A. C, lowing last year 
by a S to i score. 

The probable lineup; 

U. A. 0. Abut 

Faxon, g g, Nichols (capt.) 

Smith, p p, tJhpiiaut 

Crafts, ep cp, Smith 

Bedding, <■ c, Boyd 

< hi*t... I in. r r, Bart let t 

McCarthy, rw Iw, Evarts 

l,eavil t . tw rw. Post 



VARSITY QUINTET TO MEET 
DARTMOUTH NEXT SATURDAY 

Return Game At Hanover. Green To 

Present Rejuvenated Team After 
Dieasterous Season. 

The basketball team leaves Friday 
afternoon for Hanover where they will 
play a return game with Dartmouth. 
Since the appearance of the Green at 
at. A. C. last January Sih when thty 
were defeated W to 17, there baa been a 
radical change In their i|irintet organ- 
ixation. They lost nine straight games 
daring the early part of the season and 
« Christmas trip In and around New 
York netted five oonseentive defeats out 
of a total erf eight games. Following 
their game hen they were forced to 
take the small end of an Intercollegiate 
League game from Yale January IS and 
the game Saturday will he the first 
since that lime. The team from the 
north ha* spent the past three weeks la 
a period of mid-years and rest, while 
Coach Walker baa been putting In bobs 
bard driving practice and baa attempted 
to eradicate inaccurate basket shooting, 
ragged passing and what tie calls "com- 
plete bewilderment in a game.** New 
shifts and different line-up* have been 
the order and it may be an entirely dif- 
ferent quintet than what faced the Ma- 
roon and White In tbe Drill Hall. In 
Ainsworih Is centered the mainstay of 
the defense and be baa tbe ability to 
atleh effectively to hta man, la II linker 
will be found another good guard man 
fur he has been with the varsity aa a 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 
Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
"dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRITl CLARK &/ CU., Northampton. ' 




THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, Lincoln and Kingston Sts., 
BOSTON, JTA5S. 



Only two block* from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and easily reached from North Station 
by Elevated Hallway, and convenient alike 
to tbe treat retail shops and business centre, 
alto to the theatres and places of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Dan 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



substitute for two years and has had 
considerable experience. Mogridge 
who started at left forward is a fast 
man but inclined to be erratic at times 
especially It making the most out of a 
fast dribble. 

Since the defeat by New Hampshire, 
the M. A. C. teams has been putting in 
much practice and have developed even 
team work in both the defensive and 
offensive phases of the game and have 
developed a number of new shift com- 
binations which should be on a par 
to anything that Dartmouth can pro- 
duce. 

The probable line up: 

M. A, 0. HAHTMOl 111. 

McCarthy, rf lg, Hilleker or Larmoii 
Harrington or Lothrop, If rg, .Johnson 

or Hanser 
Whittle or Want-hard l c, Hutchinson 
Leut.ig H, Mogridge 

Parkhurst, rg r *. 1>l ' an 



WANTED ! 

For the Ordnance Department of the Army 

TO SERVE IN THE UNITED STATES 

T 



HOUSANDS of workers are urgently needed in the prose- 
cution oflbe war. The actual fighting forces would be 
powerless without an efficient civilian army hehitul there, 



IT IS YOUR DUTY TO SERVE THE GOVERNMENT, AND AT ONCE 



COLONIAL INN 

Southern Cooking Popu- 
lar ! Well, I should 
say so ! ! 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Maas. 

Where the Beat 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

TIN Rexall Store 



FRAT RELAY RACES 

The second of the interfratemity re- 
lay races Friday netted victories for 
Kappa Siiiina and Phi Sigma kappa over 
Alpha tiainma Uh<> and l^. T. V. respect- 
ively. Thai between Kappa Sigma and 
Alpha Oamma Bfco was full of light and 
was run in the fast lirrie ol "2.17 2-"., Alger 
banded over a small lead from Kurd to 
Stockbridge, who lengthened it over 
Coopvt. Hale pulled this down limn 
bpaulding ami although B»| considera- 
bly shortened this irr aline race, Wright 
came across several feet to the good, 

Stedman led /ere her in lire l*hi Nigma 
Eappa-Q. T. V. race and gave a few 
feet to the good to the next man who 
lost aome to Pratt. Chapman drew 
away from tieer.and Faxon limshed with 
a quarter lap distance from Williams in 
the time of t .19 1-8. 

Owing io the eold weather anil slip- 
pery condition of the track from the 
snow whieb fell during the afternoon, 
the interfratemity raoea between l*bi 
Sigma Kappa vs. Kappa Gamma l'hi, 
Tbeta Chi vs. Higma Phi Epalton ami 
Q.T. V. vs. Kappa Sigma were called 
off and will be run off at some future 
date by agreement of the manager and 
Mower '18 chairman of the schedule 
committee. 

ILLUSTRATED LECTURE ON 
CONSTRUCTION OF DEVENS 

An Illustrated lecture on tbe *'< on- 
M ruction of Camp Devemv* will be given 

by V. T. tioggin of t»* Vn & T - '*? 

(mist met ion Company neat Saturday, 

Feb. 2, at 0-4-*» V. *, > n ln « old t'hapel. 
Tha building of Camp Devens waa a 
mammoth aehleYMwnl, Of the 1*66 
building* which make np the camp, 
B4g were fully completed between June 
36 and Sept, 1, 1817 at a •net of *V»,000,. 
000. This lecture will be given ander 
the anaptoaa of the Union and will be 
free to members of tbe student body 
holding Social Union tickets. 



Clerical Positions 
2,000 stenographers and typewriter*, 

men and women. $1,100 to $1,200 
a year. 

Drafting Positions 

500 mechanical draftsmen, $800 to 
$i,Soo a year. 

Inspection Positions 

300 inspector!) of small-arms ammu- 
nition, $1,500 to $2,400 a year. 



Testing Positions 
aoo engineers ol tests <»f ordnance 
material, $1,500 to $2,400 a year. 

joo assistant engineers of tests of 
ordnance material, $1,000 to 
$1,500 a year. 

Mechanical Trades Positions 

2,500 machinists, $4,00 a day. 



LARGE NUMBERS IN MANY OTHER POSITIONS 

Salaries named are the usual .al.ui.-s a, 1 UigJ« ... tower aUW 

salaries inav he paid in e.-epn-nnl enae.. Poalltona , ••> Ing planes high* than 
those name. I are Mltatl] IIImI Ihrongfa pr.nii..lion. 

Men only, unless otherwise spec Hied. 

For further information appij to the represe.HHm the lulled Si ate* v 

ge.vice Communion at .1.- peel .rtttee ■■> en*.-..,, bona. lna OJ e lly.of l« heClvU 

Hrrtea U mission la Washington, 0. C Kacept tor the ^^""^^SS 

,,,,„ ;) „,t typewriter, typewriter operate, malttgrapb "I^S'l^^iffSJ. 

clerk, applicants are ..... aaaei 1 f«i a wri m — ...... 1.. . ..r . .t . 

cipal'v upon their due;. , tn i and eapertenre w shown bj I heir applle* 

Waabiagton, l>. C. 




DAVENPORT 



A homelike stopping place for "Aggie" men. 

A new. modern house with every convenience 



AFTER-SUPPER PASTIES, 1 



Mrs. J. K. W. 



i, fce. 



Pleasant St. 






Candy 



Amherst, 



COMMUNICATION 

Tboae directly Interested in the affairs 
of tbe dining ball are pleased to note 
the spirit of eo-operalten among the 
young men In charge of the rarioup 
dalles eoaneeted with the work there, 

,4 personal Interest is shown loo by 
tbe majority of those served at the din- 
ing hall as well aa by those who are 
assisting la the service. 

It Is moat gratifying and »o»t refresh- 
ing to tans approach a beginning toward 
an ideal in mind for Mien an institution. 

If conservation ..( f.».d will will win 
the war may the present helpful spirit 
isoHtiniie and the cooperation in. .case, 
M»s Oua U, Kk-sskhy. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 



w . •.!«• i...iii,v ft*r i»a»lo»« «> 



■ s 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1857 



far Sixty Tsars 1917 



Ask For Oir Crop Ms* Wi Want Reliable Agents in Unoccupied Territory 



o 



THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 



SntaMtarv of th« A^srt«aB AgtU nlttn; 

SI CHAMBERS SHEET 




NEW YORI CITY 



Maaaamaai 








*»- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1918. 



COLLEGE STILL RECEIVING 
SMALL AMOUNTS OF COAL 

Enough for at Least Another Week. 

Fraternity House Situation 

Still Unchanged. 

One car load of coal was received at 
the coal yards on Jan. 24. This is be- 
ing transported to the power plant as 
quickly as possible. At the present 
rate of consumption this will last the 
college three days. Another car is ex- 
pected by Thursday at the latest. The 
tonnage of the two cars combined is ex- 
pected to keep the college open for an- 
other week, at least. It is hard to say, 
at present, just how much further will 
the Fuel Administration's promise ma- 
terialize. 

The fraternity coal situation remains 
practically unchanged. Kappa Sigma 
is the only house which is assured of a 
winter's supply. The other houses are 
living from "hand to mouth," burning 
wood during the daytime and banking 
their fires at night with the precious 
black diamonds. 

The college departments are co-oper- 
ating also in conserving the present 
supply. The engineer at the power 
house has reduced the daily coal con- 
sumption from 30 to 15 tons. All equip- 
ment in the laboratories using either 
electrical or steam power Is being eco- 
nomically used. Classroom radiation 
has been furthermore decreased by 
moving into smaller rooms. Koom M. 
Kliut lab, and lbs pit in Clark Hall 
have been closed, in addition to the 
large number already not in use. The 
Social Union rooms no longer are brin g 
lighted evenings, and the dormitory 
roomers have acquired the habit of 
turning out their lights. 

SPRINGFIELD JINX 
It is interesting to note that last 
week's hockey victory over the Spring- 
field r. H. C. A. Training school is but 
one of a series of continuous triumphs 
by U. A. C. over the "Home CHy"nta. 
In t he recollection of the oldest member 
of the Springfield College faculty, and 
even of Chief Hall, who is an author- 
ity on all sport* at the Training School, 
Springfield baa yet to defeat the Maeaa- 
cbusetts Aggies at hockey A return 
game will be played her* Fab. 23 and it 
will be interesting to see whether the 
Bad and the White jinx is still desirous 
of making history repeat itself. 



WAR SAVING STAMPS 

For Sale at the Treasurer's Office. 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



The main reason for their purchase is 
that the Country is at War. 

To win we must win as a united people. The savings of every 
man, woman anil child are needed to hasten the ending of this war. 

SAVE TO SERVE 

Every War Saving Stamp is a direct obligation of the Govern- 
ment—a Baby Bond. It is redeemable in five years at 4 per cent 
compound interest. 

Each stamp costs a quarter. Buy 16 stamps and attach them 
to a card which is given you when you buy your first stamp. 
When your card is filled it has cost you $4.00. Take the full 
card and exchange it for a $5 00 War Saving Certificate upon an 
additional payment of 12 cents. You then have a Certificate re- 
deemable in five years for the full value of $5.00. 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



-AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



Ask the Committee for any information : — 

Bowen, \ , 1919 
Buflfum, 1919 



Chapman, 1918 
Foley, 1918 
Pratt, 1918 
Russell, 1918 
Smith, C. T., 1918 



Hurt, 1919 
Callanan. J., 1919 
Chandler, 1919 



Campbell, 1920 
Smith, R. N., 1920 
ll.illett. 1921 
Lockwood. 1921 



COLLEGE SHOES 



We 



carry the largest stock in 
state outside of Boston. 



the 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAH 



CARS 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•»•.— Prof, It, a. WWW, fannerty of 
the Department of floriculture, M. A, 

(' , nrnr of Cornell, baa an article on 
breeding" In tbe current number 
1 be International Garden Club 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Associate Alumni, C, A. Peters, Secretary— 454-W 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, F. A .McLaughlin, Secretary— 432-R 
M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, C. S. Hicks, Treaaurer-— 403-M 



11. uums P. N'ickerson is 
Major of WeW Artillery at Camp Travis, 
San Antonio, Tesaa, 11* acted aa an 
inairoctor in Held artillery at the Unit 
and second R. Q, T. C, camps at Lara 
Spring*. 

*X8.— The following represented the 
claw on the rant pit* during the mid- 
winter alumni day: Mm, Wheeler. (Mis* 
Hidden.) (build, Kuasell, Mrmtruw, Bay, 
Fernald, Wetberbee, Wilden and Jones, 

*n.— Tbe Department of Landscape 
Hardening baa received from S. Wan* 
ley Dai!! '17 a collection of reprodHe- 
liona of landscape paintings, mostly bf 
Maaseti and Goodwin, showing wild 
American iandaeape aeeoery. These 
are at tbe sort extensively it tidied 
by tbe alttdeati la tbe Landscape 
Department, 



Non-Athletic Association, 

Tbe College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Football Association, 

RMe Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M, A, C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Inter class Athletic Committee, 



H. E. Robbina, Manager -res, 61-W 

H. L. Roasell, President— 416 

C. G. Walloon, Manager— SjsS-W 

R. B. Collins, Acting Manager— 5336 

j, A. Chapman, Manager— 8314 

S. P. Baicheldar, Manager— 8364 

V. H. Canlelt. President— S33I-W 

M. F. Kvans, Manager— 8347 

K, M. Buffum. Manager— SjjS-W 

R. L, rteyd. President— 416 

H. I.. Russell, President— 1 to-R 

John Yesair, Secrdary— 8346 



M. A, C far llolyoke ?•«> and hourly 
until 11 10 >• M. 

M. A. C.for Amherst 6 *o,6^s. 7-20, 750, 
&-©§, 8-jo, then 20 mm. and 35 mm. 
after the hour until to io P. M Other 
car* at i i-|0 A. w., 35©. 5 50, 7S®» 95©. 
10-50 P. at., and a laH car at 11-20 i\ m 

Amherst far M, A. C. 6*5. 6^30, then 
half-hourly until 800 A. at., 815, 0-i>, 
then 15 mm. and 30 min. alter the hour 
until 11 30 f. M. Other rata at tioo 
noon and 4 00. 6 oo.S 00,10 00 p. m. and 
a last car at is 3© e, M. 

sr*. i.l Cart at B imimM * •*•«'» 



nPHtRSI I SUNOERLANO ST. RY. CO 



Cleaning and Pressing 
DRESS SUITS Fll HIRE 

0#nta' rurnhhlmt* Ttrketl 

n 



Amherst Co-op 





High-Grade College Worh 

Shirts, - - tWit 

nillm, - • * II-** 

tnm, - - * W* 

Plain Waah. - « per do*. 4Sf 

•Same, rough dry, - per do*. 34c 



Dr? Cleaning 

Steam Pressing &t% § antta for %\M 
I»ry Cleaning and Pressing, %\M a toll 



All M» iiBfiihta mt full . 
left there will receive proBipiaiWirttaB. 



Tbe Connecticut Valley 

St reel Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton. 
tltfwiffc the Hatields, paat the foot 
rf Su^r Lwl Ml., alongside the 
famous Woody Brook battle ground 
to Old tteerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Palls and across tbe 
" Plains M to Uke Pleasant, Mont a 
gue and Millers Falls. 

§0 MUM Of Irickagt lodrrn 

Um System Freight and F.a- 
preaa Aarvlce over entire Mm. 

Connecticut Valley Street 





~* ^ T>^.- 



t FEB r -1918 



v^ 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, Ferbuary 5, 1918. 



No. 15 



RELAY TEAM WINS FROM 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AT BOSTON 

Carpenter, Dark Horse in 1000 Yard 

Handicap, Wins Handily from 

Large Field. 

At the 2»l li annual It. A. A. mi't't held 

in Ueebaaiea Hall on Saturday, Feb. 2, 

the Mar.M.n an<l Wliiu. r.lay u-ain B»dc 
an MSJ L'«'t away trom Now Hanipshh.' 
Slate. Tlie rare wan <l..».c a! llit-stait. 

bui Aggta f""" 1 aatde ■ wldi opesiog. 
Pre* commenced t tie rare fur M A.<". 
aud NiulHiimale. who lunl previoiivly 
run ihe tluee-mile. l.-r N«w llanip-,liire 
Ht»te. l'ree rq4 'lie jump ai ihe Urst 
bank and itra.lually erepl up I" ■ two 
I lead, which ha handed ever to Baw- 
iiigwhnin Ihe taxi nim' ©f 4** nei-unils, 
wtdeueil the lead Ui Ifi yard*©«ei Irvine. 
The baton wan tkM haii«ie<l to Newell. 
wbu WM quite superior io Melville, ami 
hamled Yeai.aira«Ayanl handh a t . ovc-r 
OLeary. Here wai* New UaaapabltV'fl 
big hope, but the faatmanwa* unable 
,., cloafl up ifca dlutam-e. and Ve^aii 

eioased tfca Haw with a Uf li y«rd* 

lead. Tlie line b<riu displayed ill the 
race and the oaeellenl bandlini; of the 
hatwn xpeak* well ol the work ot Ooacfa 
Uk-kiOHUii. The time, 3 minutes 21 aee- 
ouda.waa rather slow. Owl ng to tin- 
eold weather. lh« te»ni» could uot let 
warmed up. 

(arpenl H a very pretty race, 
carried ui ...imraia tbe louu yard 

handieap ft i bta there were W en- 
trie-, am. t, J? m Have Caldwell M-US 
■ od Joie *S *0 Tbe limit handicap wm 
« vanb'-P p*'iti<T Hiart.-.l at the Ho 
yard m | £ hile Itay of the Illinois 



DRAFTED R. 0. T. C. MEN 

MAY WIN COMMISSIONS 

Government to Admit Membera of 

Advanced Course to Train- 

ing Oampa. 



BOSTON ALUMNI BANQUET 

TO BE INTERCOLLEGIATE 

At Boston Opera House Februnry 16. 
Oeer Fifty Institutions to be Rep- 
resented at Patriotic Rally. 



i jg ^ 1 2 yarda behind w*rateh. 

i in- «t M I • • aar,e * , th * ,mrg ** ,i,>1,i 

[•artnsSjS <> "••" "rack, aad tbe end 

„t then. -. Ipfoooal Carpenter in «<•<•■ 
..in I pl» 4 'e. Then, with I hur»t id upeeii 
be drew away trom ihe «r..w. I and look 
a big lead, which he held for the re#l 
of the we. In the last few m-mumL. 
Kay made a deaperaie alternpl to take 
tbe lead, but farpenier'n line form and 
,,,, i.iition kept htm out ot all danger, 
m that he inn«Ue.i ittyarda ahead of 
the IHifioii afar. The Hots wea* m\n* 
nttaWl-fiweondp, 



Miinl.ers of the advanced course of 
the Reserve Ollieers" Traininu «"orps 
who an- in the seeond year of instruc- 
tion Of the present seniors, it railed into 
military servite under the provisions ol 
du' ! Selective Draft Law. will be admit- 
ted to the appropriate servk-e sehool for 
training eandldatec for enaanslaalona. 

This derision has heen riaehed hy 
the adjutant general's olliee of ihe war 
tlepatlment. the ruiillji to be etleetive 
in tin- raaC irf laiolidates who ale lotllld 
physi.ally and menially qtialilted to 
enlei ihe training eampa. 

When eligilde uieniheis of the It. O. 
T, C. are called into serviee, the proles 
sor ol military seieme and tueiicaal the 

c«.iie»e will Inform ike adjutant gen- 
erals nlfoa of thai fact. He will give 
ahw, in detail, the t|iialiti<aiions of the 
candidate in order that the appliealinii 
for admission may be given proper eon- 
^'nleration. 

The oflicial announcement of thUde 
eislon was reteived hy * ol.mel Wilson 

recently from k aadqaa rtaw oi ihe 

Northea-iern department at Itoston.aml 
,t... c.mpl.'te tent is aa f.dlows: 

] It ha- been decided that roemliern 
of ihe KeaerveidlieersTraininK <«rp«, 
s«eOtt4 year advameil eoiirae, who are 
.ailed into the military service under 
ihe piovisions of the Selective Service 
Uw, will be atlmiited. If fonnd quali- 
lled.to th.- appropriate wrvice scbiwd 
lor training eandldates for cummlsMoii. 
i. When aneh meinbeni are «Uled 
into the service, the pnifewor of mllt- 
laf] || , n.e mid tactl™ on duty at the 
lehoel ..r eollege will inform the Aii- 
julaiit t.emral of the Army «d the fa.t 
and of their qua I i Hem tons la order thai 
their admittance as candidate* in train- 
ing srh.wla f»»r omcern may be given 
propel ronniderallon. 
Hj order id the Jwrwiary of War* 
W. T. JntiNsT.x, 

Adjutant Ganeral. 



The tireater llostnn Alumni Associa- 
tion has neatly completed plans lor its 
annual banquet, which will be jointly 
held with more llian B0 colleges ami 
universities of the country with active 
associations of boston alumni, at the 
Boston Opera House, .Saturday Keb. lti. 
This all-colleuc galherng will be mote 
than a ban.|iiet,for it will be nothing less 
than a great Intercollegiate patriotic 
rally, wi.h thousands of men in attend* 
.,,„, plcduing Ihcmselves to pHlli«»Uc 
service. 

The general situations of food, fuel, 
business and the exigencies of war time, 
which have drawn off many of the 
>..ungei alumni at lir«t inllnen.cd many 
of the alumni associations to eith.i 
abandon ur mmlify their plans but n..w 
an a siibsiliule, will be this uniqnc 

project, 

Kxpeiiscs have been curtailed as 
mum h as possible and a delinlle end is 
i„ %cw j that of probably taking some 
it.-tioii lot the support of the Ameri.au 
Iniveisity liiion abroad. In fa.t Ike 
entire proceeds of the meeting will no- 
.loubtedly uo for this purpose The 
program has not been completed. The 
chief speaker will be a man ol national 
and iiit«rnational prominence and 
.lumes M. Heck former attorney general 
has been given ibe opportunity t«» 
address such a gathering. Mr Hot ham 
editor of the Providence Journal, who 
has been so active in expo»* ir »K "inner. 
0TM lorinan plots in this country 
tbmngb his pap*'- w,n pndiably be a 
supplciuentaty speaker. 

A feature id tins m-i-ting will be tin- 
singing at college songs by diffcr-nt 
cdlege glee clubs. lTof. Uwls id 
Tufta was l«> have charge «d Ibis phase 
.,) «.„i,ruiiniiieiit, and a big band is t» 
be on hand to make additional har- 
mony. 

A complete pr^nw will be announc- 
ed In tbe neat bwmcof tbe (-qi.i.koiah. 



DARTMOUTH AGAIN LOSES 
TO M.A.C. AT BASKETBALL 

Aggie Team Plays Fine Game, Good 
Team Work Being Espec- 
ially Prominent. 



INFORMAL TO BE HELD AT 

HALL SATURDAY 



G. K. Bamitt *i7 f Alpha Si ma Phi Houie \ F. E. Cole,J r.'so, College Store. 



00M, «ttVAKOH IKfROVIWO 

Two carload* ot coal arrtved at Iba 

cllege Ia*» >aMit.la% . after Iwlng held 
up for-wmie tinii i U> -Mow KaH-. \ 
The rc)...rf M»a lay cvetiiin: f«* that 
this ulitpmeni added to ll •'•'' a 

half's aupfdy on hutid wonld • ■ >ngh 
!.« heat Ike c.llcae tat anotber week, j 
^m\ Wailnuttwwi UawtfoW baw it-" 1 ' 
Ised fbrec ■ ' tt, " k a '"' ,,u ' r *' 

are at pres, ■-, etiraof eoal on the | 

way herc= the average weekly con- j 
laaiptfoa of tha .ollege ia about 1W . 
tons and it tbe present severe weatberi 
BMNleratas there »b««M be birt alight' 
dlfBcalty in obtaining the weekly three 
carload a. 



SOPHOMORE SMOKER 



Iflbepwat Is any criterion ot a 
time, the informal to lie held neai s»'- 
urday at Uraper UflU should be most 
„,i.-. .-— ml. The highly pleasing result* 

„f the last «»"•*. l»« ,d tfc * re J »" "*• 
.„ -iifMi'loiii reason for another j 

i i he same place. This time,! 

h.,wever, the number lit colipies Will be 

United loiO wkoae names should have 
fjjrin R tven t» Laa pbtar by Taeaday 

evening. The college orchesira, which 
playeci Ircfore. is expected to repeat its 
fine work. The iaa p srn« s i , h> dale, 
have eot been annomneed, but tbeir 
Barnes, together wllh tbe ear ■chednles, 
w tH be made known at aaaembly 
We4Beaday. 



The class of 1W0 held ila secund and 
Wl- t sncceaafnl smoker. d the year Wed- 
ne«lav evening »" !-• BseW I «'!««. 
After all hands had "Mil up'theslar 
allracihin «f the evening, "Uenn" burns 
gave hi« world famoaa lecture, 'The 
Three Peaa and the Pod." Ihe class 
was e»lre.uely fortunate in securing 
ihe s ervb-esof the Cellar performer, as 
tin denanda fi-.m the Sew Kngland 
colleges, Incliiding Smith, keep ihe 
'Dean'' wmsiantly on the jump. He 
also favored the assemblage with songs, 
dances and jokes. tJolouel Wilson gave 
a mo*! IntereatiBg account of bis life 
in ihe l\ B, army. Songs, dances and 
sports by members of tbe class com- 
pleied the program while "eau" were 
aerved. 



Dartmouth lost her lentil consecutive 
basketball game this season when II, 
\. ('. carried ol the honors of a *2<i to 21 

scon- from the Hanover court, despite 
a most brilliant comeback in ihe iceond 

half to shake ihe jinx. The game was 

fast inn u.ii spectacular for Ike M. A. <*. 

team woikcil as a unit, showing much 
impiovcinciii in morale since the de- 
l.ai by Stevens Friday night. Dart- 
mouth's teamwork had no commendable 
fcatuie. Thcii passing was extremely 
erratic and the basket seemed to be 

hard for I hem to lind at lirst. tin the 
other hand M. A G sccm.-d to have 
jxissession ot I lit- ball much of the lime 
due to the very . •Ii-n-r intercept Ion ol 
Dartmouth's long pDMta and the ability 
to keep tlie t.r.i-n lorwanls well covered 
and what sln.is the lait.r aHcmptc.l 
were largely blocked. The Massaehn 
setts Ave had many opportunities for 
baskets but the. basket seemed just a 

littla toohigb or low ai the right ItsM 

or the run had Ihe lendem y tocoiiiracl, 
I'hls failuie ol correct judgement in 
liM-ailiiK the liasket was s factor that 
kept the U. A. t:. tally from reaching 
the thirties. 

The game was eatremely clean 
throughout and well refereed, Klght 
represents the total »• fouls, M. A ('. 
having two ic.-hni.-ai offenses while 
each team was recorded with three 
personals. 

hi the second half Dartmouth set 
to be completely demoralised, the 
ing was |HH»r and the cover mtt*t have 
ImihoI uibbci while at the same lin.e 
i he Mar. .on and White wen were having 
little trouble In dropping the ball into 
the basket, with the l ant w approach- 
ing W to H. At this time foach Wal« 
ker. I*egan wholesale nubstilut ions 
patting In nearly s fresh team and with 
little ovri live minutes 10 plav, Dart- 
mouth broke through t!..- M \. « . de- 
fense and started a pretty ...ineback, 
\t the timer's whistle they had made 
fifteen points and w.-rc evident iv 
capable..! moic. The m-i. whosfarttd 
for the Itay Wale plav.. I law c 
game and at this time ot the sjanie weie 
in no such eondiiion as their new Of* 

ponenls. 

The game started off lively with the 
ball 111 in. A. *',*■ hands most of the 
time but ill spin- of a leimbanhneiil ..! 
Dartmouth - banfcli inme «cem In sink 
through I In- rum due to {nwir ikjOOllogi 
The score keep.-rs work itegati Ifl sail 
ules after the opening whistle wlon 
Mct'arthy drew lirst hi. mm! by caging the 
first tally, followed a*>on if for by Ain - 
worth for the ttreen. The stands be- 
came enlhusiaslic when l.arman Bwi 
bis team In the lead hut hall a minute 



• ■-•ai 








'• 



a 



^» a 



it 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



I 



later Whittle evened up the score. At 
half time the score stood six all. 

M. A. 0, came back Itroag in the sec- 
ond half and on the tirst jump off, 
Park hurst caught the ball from Blanch- 
ard's finger* and made a long and pretty 
basket. About this time the Aggie team 
etarted to sweep everything toward 
their objective. The defense had the 
Dartmouth forwards completely boxed 
up and pulled down all kinds of enemy 
passes while the M. A. ('. forwards put 
mi an exhibit inn of clever dodging and 
fast door work. It was at this stage of 
the contest that the score board indi- 
cated a tally in the proportion of four 
to one iu favor of the I'uritan State. 
The home team by this time was 
clearly showing signs of weakess and 
BOOO complete demoralization. Substi- 
tute* were sent in by Dartmouth coach 
which soon started a different tune. 
Sullivan started with a beautiful long 
basket which was the beginning of a 
grim uphill light for Dartmouth. Sulli- 
van, who played in the hack tie hi. soou 
followed up with two more while Deane 
also made two. The fresh condition of 
the team made it easy for them to keep 
uncovered and this advantage was made 
the most of, However, time was too 
short and at the final whistle the score 
stood 26 to 21. 

The feature of the game was easily 
the fine fight of Dartmouth iu the last 
ditch but the fine all round work of the 
whole M. A. ('. team was especially 
commendable. They were clever in all 
phases of the game and both end* of 
the court played their own games, the 
whole beniu 1 line example of eu..»|..i.i 
tion. Dartmouth** lank of team work 
brought out individuals who excel led. 
Iu thts.Nulli van's Work was noteworthy. 
Put into ilillikeis position in the last 
few minutes he made three flue baskets 
until forced to leave the (lour with ■ 
wrenched knee a* the result of a colli- 
sion. Deane, a substitute at right for- 
ward also rame through In good shape. 

An incident of the game wu the sub* 
Ntitutionof Moriartv for Capt. Hutch- 
inson at center and "Bad** Blancbard. 
said ba "could just look over bis ihouN 
der. M 

The summary; 

M. A, t . n \ I. I vii, i i ii 

McCarthy, capt. If If, Larraan 

Whittle, rf rf , Johnson 

Ulan, hard, c c, Hutchinson, oapt. 

I'arkburai. rb rb, Ihlliker 

U'iit, lb lb, A ins worth 

Score— M. A, C, SB, Dartmouth U. 
. d trom iter— Whittle 5, McCarthy 
4. Park bunt 2, Hlanehard, Sullivan S, 
Deane 8, l.arman, Johnson, Aim* wort h. 
Mugridge.M.i ii , siittntitutes for Dan- 
nemtb— ttulli^an t..r (hUlker, Deane for 
Johnson, MttfHdga for Larman, 
Moritny for Kntebinaon, Haueef for 
Sullivan, (Joala truni fonts— McCarthy 
2, Mugrldge 1, Fouls iHjtuii It, A, 0, 
I, Dartmouth 4, Kefaree— Young of 
Jforth Adams. TImar— MosJsy of Dart- 
mouth, Scorrrs - Chapman of M, A. C, 
Sears of Dartmouth. Time— 20 Minute 
hal 



CONFERENCE IS GUEST OF 

® X AT SOCIAL MEETING 

College Questions Discussed by Un- 
dergraduates, Faculty, and 
Alumni. 

At the social meeting of the Interfra- 
ternity Conference, Thursday night, 
Jan. 31, the conference was the guest of 
Theta Chi fraternity. A feature of the 
evening was the presence of several 
faculty fraternity men who added their 
ideas to the discussion of the evening. 
Chester P. Spufford '15 represented the 
alumni of Kappa Gamma Phi ; Philip F. 
Whit more represented Theta (hi; Fred- 
erich A. McLaughlin '11 from Kappa 
Sigma and F. P. Rand from Phi Sigma 
Kappa each told their side of the discus- 
sion on scholarship, the rushing reason, 
and the cnl lege schedule. In regard to 
the improvement of the scholastic stand- 
ing of M. A. C. it was the idea of those 
present that fraternities could exert a 
very powerful favorable intluenee upon 
the scholastic standing of their men by 
making good scholarship seem more 
valuable to the men. The relative num- 
ber of successful men who were good 
scholars in college was suggested as an 
impetus toward individual effort. 

The question of the shortening of the 
rushing season was brought up and 
every one agreed that the present sys- 
tem was entirely satisfactory. One sug- 
gestion was that no freshman should be 
bid until after a month in col lege and 
that be should be required to maintain 
an average of over 75% in ail bis college 
work during this period. This has the 
advantage of requiring a high standard 
of scholarship and preventing the num- 
erous flunks which are too common here 
at M. A. <*, On the other band the pro- 
longed rushing season would mean more 
.-xpeiiMc and time to the already over- 
burdened upperclassmen. 

The census of opinion of the confer- 
ence was decidedly in favor of ■ longer 
college year than has been planned for 
1018-19. They seconded the opinion of 
the student body as voiced in the stu- 
dent i. .rum Wednesday. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



rRkSHMr \ HI Mil I \ I ID 

At the assembly last Wednesday, the 
college Senate tried out a unique plan 
of punishing freshmen who bad broken 
the freshmen rules. Each man came 
before the asseably, where his offence 
was stated and the punishment meted 
out read by the offender. The principal 
offeiH ••• in earn case was thai of not 
wearing thr fn«hin«o cap within the 
prescribed limits. The punimhinenl 
consisted of doing a definite amount of 
work for some varsity manager.* nd in a 
few flow, learning by heart essays on 
such subjects as truth and modesty, 



JUNIOR CLASS MEETING 

At a meeting of the junior class held 
In the Entomology Building on Wed 
ii.-day night, it was decided to make 
the /mi« purely a class book. This 
action was taken because, owing to poor 
business conditions, It was found Impos- 
sible to nccure enough advertisements 
to warrant publishing a larger and more 
expensive book. It was decided to run 
a modi lied "Prom" from March 8th to 
10th. The dance Is to be In Draper Hall 
on Friday night and ta to be a formal 
affair. Members of the other classes 
nay attend the junior dance. The com* 
miller in charge of the dance in com- 
posed of Stewart P, Bat eh elder of Vortb 
Reading, chairman, Robert D. Chfs- 
holm of Melrose, Myrton F. Evans of 
snuiervllle, Raymond T, Paranatal of 
Fiicbhurg, and Gbariea Crowe of Hor» 
wicb, Conn, 

Instead of a smoker, the next elaaa 
affair is to be a supper in Draper Ball. 

Tbe clan elected the following officers 
far the rest of tbe year; President, 
Kdward A. While of Pwridenee ; *tee- 
•fwMattf, Robert B.f'olIInsof RockUrfidi 
secretary, Wilbett D. Field ofSonier- 
ville; treasurer, Arthur M. McCarthy 
of Monson; captain, Lorieg V. Tirrell 
of South Weymouth j sergean*.at-srms, 
Ernest L, Qod etfe of South b ridge, 

Amherst College's application to 
itti-ome a member of the K. O. T G. baa 
been granted. 



College Men 

are proverbially Critical Men— 
especially in the matter of Clothes 

Society Branfc dlotbes 

Are the Preference of Thousands 
of the Student Body of America's 
Greatest Universities and Colleges 



Jordan Marsh Company is the favorite shopping place of 
thousands of college men in New England, undergraduates 
and alumni. 

Hence 

Isn't it quite right and logical that Society Brand Clothes 
should be carried in Boston by Jordan Marsh Company 



exclusively ? 



Purchases Delivered Free to Amherst 



Jordan Marsh Company 



H. I.. KIMEIX. Mar.. •«. 
K. M. HI'KKt M. US 



R, B. COLLI NK. MS 
F. K COL*, "» 



M. A. C. STOR 

Basement of North Dormito ry 



Undergraduates ourselves, we know what under- 
graduates want 

Sweaters, Athletic Suppliesand Drill Shoes 



The E. E. Millett Estate 



Amherst, 



A fait Mm of Ctritot* Jnrslr? slwsn Id ttet-1 
Brakea Urm rep t s ceJ whU# run wait 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.DS. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amhatat. M 

9 to Its, m„ l-WWip, m 



Boies of Choice Flowers 

will alwayi itand m i ho tlneit 
upreMlea of 

Gratitude; Congratulations; 

Best Wishes; Love; 

Sympathy. 

Dept. ot Floriculture 

T el epho ne W 



WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of ire 

Alio a good Him of 
STUDENT LAMPS AND 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 
The "Nonotuck* 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 



RATES, $1.50 PER DAY AND UP 

Large Banquet Hall — Smart Parti 
—Prows— Our Specialty. 



M. A. C. SEPTET TO MEET 

DARTMOUTH ON SATURDAY 

Viaitora to Preaent a Strong Defensive 

Team. Game to Take Place 

at 8 P. M. 



WEST POINT WINS CLOSELY 
CONTESTED HOCKEY GAME 

Redding Scores for Aggie. Army 

Goal Tender Saves Game by 

Brilliant Work. 



Come to us for 



P. J 1EHA 



Dartmouth is scheduled as the next 
opponent of tbe varsity hockey team on 
the M. A. C. rink next Saturday al 8 
p. m. The Greeu so far has had a sea- 
son which has not put them Into their 
stride, having won from Tufts l»y the 
score of 5 to 0, and lost to tat strong 
Pittsburgh A. A. team 7 to 5, last 
Saturday. 

The up State men have been weak 
ened by the los> of Dorney at point, 
because of faculty difficulties, but prac- 
tice has increased the speed ami pass- 
ing game of the light and inexperienced 
forward line. The backbone of the 
team, however, is la the defense, which 
Is relied ou to offset a comparatively 
weak offensive combination. Either 
Gale or J. Ross, veterans of last year's 
septet, will play the net position, lioth 
are dependable and experienced men. 
but Ross is a little fast and may get in 
at point. Hutchinson, who playcil mi 
last year's freshman team will play 
cover point. He carries himself well on 
the ice but has r.ot had much ex- 
perlence. 

it Is aroum! (apt. Murphy of Maiden, 
at rover, that Dartmouth's attack will 
center. He plays a fast, convict 
game, but Is inclined to become more or 
less individual In bis play. Proctor, at 
canter, Is playing bis llrst year of var». 
ily, and though extremely I'gbt lias 
shown up well, for he Is a fair shot bat 
lacking, like most of the men, in ex- 
perience. Davis and F. Boas will pay 
the wing psaittons. Tbe former has 
shown up well and pairs off with Rose, 
a freshman, who plays a consistem 
game throughout. 

The M. A, C. combination, which his 
gone through a moat aaecesafol season 
of three victories, one scoreless tie ami 
a I to 1 defeat at the hands al West 
Point last Saturday, will present tbe 
same lineup. The college pond baa 
been swept clean of the light snowfall 
of Sunday and practice will be held 
with special emphasis on team play and 
passing, for it Is by lata method of at 
tack that M. A. C. hopes to penetrate 
the lining Dartmouth defense, 

TO ENROLL M. A. C. IN A, U. U. 

FJaaa have been made and work 
started to obtala for M, A. (\. member, 
ship la the American University Union 
in lurope situated hi Paris with a 
branch la toadon, For «»H»ges hav- 
tag a» alumni body of leea than one 
thousand awa the membership fee 
Is tiou per year, Ffwridfni Butter- 
lield baa eapreeted very strongly hip 
desire that the college should belong 
to the Union but BOW not feel JiiMiiied 
Id using the regular funds of the col- 
lege for oayingsuch a fee, A campaign 
b« beenMarted by Dr.Patera *91. seen,- 
tary of the associate alumni, aamna the 
former students (ti-**m «'< ,h '* «»"»** 
to raise ihist.i.Ml for tbe twi ***"*}*? 
will be announced a- a gin ,«« •»>* «" 1 ; 
lege from them, all WUrplBi ***•« !f*f»' 
the payment „f the annual fee in the 

f,, Thu 7 or«.-ni«.i«». »• -«""-:;; ;;[ 

American onivemitlps »«<' "" • k ' 
which maintain in Paris a *i»'P»«- * ••» 
lege clot, for college men wiih •« «■■ 
tomarv club privilege*, such a- »n ,n ™ ,a , 
lion bureau, library . h-i r-.m- . m. •' ■« 
Krvtces social (eat ore... -,. xnd •- »pc« 
^ r> * "' , _,. ,„,ii,.,.«.„ :,re tr«««»'- 

tolhtise men Whose colleges bi^ 

l««rs of the association • 
Knen now in Eatopa. m*«s •> in w i 
and nearly 400 prepar,n K them-e - ia 
Tarloma camps lor eerrice there awn. 



M. A. C. lost a stubbornly contested 
uanie to the Army puck shooters Satur- 
day at West Point by the close score of 
2-1. The teams were evenly matched 
and it was not until the final whistle 
blew that the outcome was certain. 
Rough work characterized the play at 
times though no penalties were called. 
Oliphant, of football fame, proved little 
trouble for the Aggie men though he 
made his presence felt on several 
occasions. The West Point team was 
somewhat the heavier but could not 
carry the puck as well as the Aggie 
seven. 

All the scoring was done in the first 
half. After a lively scrimmage in front 
of the M. A. 0. cage, lioyd managed to 
slip the puck by Faxon for a score. 
Things were evened up shortly when 
Redding caged one, after reeeisiiig a 
short pass from l.eavitt. The deciding 
point was registered ou a sharp drive by 
1'ost during the last tew minutes of the 
tirst half. 

The play in the second half was fast 
and rough, neither side being able to 
■eat*. Time and again the Aggie men 
peppered the Army cage. It was only- 
due to the good work of Nichols that 
the score was kept down. Faxon also 
made several clever stops during this 

half. 
The line-up and summary: 

\s l - I POIMT. **■ A# '*' 

Nichols, g e, Faxon 

oliphant, p p,D. smith 

Kvarts, ep cp, (i.iti-. 

lt,,vd,e c. Bedding 

post.r r, Chlsbolm 

Rartlelt.lw Iw, Uavllt 

Uiee, rw rw, McCarthy 

Score- West Point— 1. U. A. C 1, 
Goals- F!r*t half Hoyd In »;*). Ucd 
diogta 11:60, fMN la 1" -" SBbatMo- 
tioos Lew (or Pic Referee f'sptsin 
Viner. Time of halve* Twenty mln 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to §ee you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



r 



i 



Scbillavc's StuMo 

36 /IMtn St., 

"Mortbampton 




CUTLER 



•DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



VrVRSITY QUINTET PLAYS 
NEW HAMPSHIRE SATURDAY 

ta Return Oatne at Durham. Both 
Tearna Havs Shown Marked Im- 
provement ia Work. 

The M. A, C quintet will juiirmy to 
Durham Friday fur n re! urn game with 
New Hawp»hireata!»t»n Saturday. Keh. 
otb. Thai the Ufaniietiiate men have 
iMjilweu aiMe their M-B Ticlory over 
M, a. 0, «.n the Drill ball aarface lent 
month, I* »b«»wn by »Hl»»ftnE 
thrlrexhlMllt»na with Springfield Y. H. 
C A. Th« flr*t K»nie went la the train- 
ing pwhnol team l»y t hn ««»» el W to •* 
earlv la*' nniniii. Since then Xew 
HampaMre haa ^aaa nma^lag <>tit inti» 
n elever and fa»t unfl a» wai thnwn in 
their tr«nie here. l*af PrMaj ^^laK' 
ti« 1.1 jilaypd aretara gaate at Durlmin 
aad la a tiaht nip and turk game tin 
able Iti Be' t In 1«ik rn«I iff a W f«i & lewra 
only after* h«nl oMtaaL A ai a n oo at 
».pni..r i.» ntlll the hl«b man f«tr New 
(JamiMfcfn, 

pin- will orer Dart motn h 1^ Satur- 
day «b»wp a marked improvement after 
tfca itmiiiMV te dltimji wbieh cropped 

i,,,:,,:).! 9t««ea« name, TheM, A. t*. 
| f( . more efilelent in ay»- 

HiiH.tize.i team work «Tid prw«Ht»«« 
all«vanrid eoniiilrmiinti 



REMEMBER 



YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND 



The Best in Materials and Manufacture 



NO MATTER WHAT YOl MCIID 



THE LINE OF CLOTHES 



1 



»re mem 

.-r 



prof K, A Wauuh baa been appal i ted 
i Pomuna Deputy by the nawly »le«ted 
Maaier of the 8latt,«rw§e. 




At the 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hut Sehailner & M&rs GlotliM 




wmmm 



^0* 



I 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
§etta Agricultural College. 

HOARD OF EDITORS- 
MAIi.SHAI.LO. I.ANPHKAUMs.Editor-in-Chtef 



ASSOCIATK ElUTOHB. 

ARTHUK N. BOWEN 'Hi 

ELIOT M. Kl FKl'M '19 

ARTIU'R L. (HANDLER '19 

MYRTON F. EVANS 



It 



BUSINESS DEl'AKTMENT. 
SAMUEL B. KERRISS '19, Hualneu Manager 
<}. M. CAMPBELL, '», AwUUmt Manager 

JAMES <*. MAPLES '20. Advertising Manager 
G. ALFR2D SMITH *ao. rinulation 



Subscription 18.00 per year. Single 
copies, « cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager an soon as possible. 

Entered M •econd-elMi matter at the An.heret 
Ptiet Office. 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Feb. 5. No. 15 



Tiik only disappointing thing about 
the student forum of Jan. HO is that the 
faculty were not present to hear the aide 
present allon of the arguments pro and 
.on of the Itaree terra system of ten 
weeks «wh as proposed for next year. 
It was without doubt the best Wednes- 
day forum ever hold on the campus. 
Not only Is It gratifying to write that In 
the short assembly period nineteen men 
gut up and expressed their frank opin- 
Ions on this vital question, but also that 
this was done ex tern pore; and that each 
liitle talk badapoint and would have 
done credit to any speaker. If shows 
that the student body Is awake to the 
affairs that are going on about the cam- 
pus and thai (bey are fully prepared to 
get up and express their views on the 
questions in point. Of course, the mat- 
ter of a thirty week year of three terms 
has already been decided upon. Though 
a joint committee from the faculty and 
Adelphia are considering the matter 
this week, It is doubtful if my changes 
can be made. But even if nothing 
come* of this, a start has been made in 
the right direction. The student body 
has put Itself on record as bring able to 
take the maximum advantage of a 
forum. It basset for Itself a standard 
to which it mast live up. This made, 
thereisnoreamin why the student forum 
should nut play an Important part In 
our campus life hereafter. 



need. This is to be accomplished 
through the purchase of a book of, 
tickets that members of the soldier's 
family and his friends may send him at 
the front. This is called a smileage 
book and maybe bought in two sizes, 
20 coupons foradollaror 100 ooaposa 
for live dollars. These coupons will be 
good for payment for seats at any per- 
formance in any camp under the direc- 
tion of the Commission on Training 
Camp Activities. The goal set for is 
$1,000,000, all of which is to be raised by 
tbe folks at home by the purchase of 
these books. 

Our part in this campaign is being 
considered by a sub-committee of the 
War Service committee and plans will 
probably be announced shortly. Alto- 
gether we have about 200 men in service 
who would be greatly benefited by 
stnileane books. Here Is certainly of- 
fered a chance for each one of us indi- 
vidually to show our appreciation of 
what they are doing. But the question 
naturally arises as to just how far a non 
producing body like the students here 
can go with so many campaigns. First 
came the f. M. C. A. drive which bled 
most of the men dry. Then followed 
the student recreation fund, the lied 
Crisis, the thrift stamp drive and now 
the ■mileage. Other equally worthy 
campaigns will probably come up in the 
future. And to each one of these every 
man at M. \. <\ would like to sacrilice 
his all. Hut in some cases, in many in 
fac', a limit must be set. Perhaps the 
time for campaigns as a student body 
has now passed, Indlv ! dual drives will 
probably be more satisfactory. Some 
men may be appealed to by smileage 
books. Others may prefer to put their 
all into Y. ,M. < . A. or Ked Cross. It Is 
often true that It gives mure satisfaction 
to put Ave or ten dollars into some cause 
which particularly appeals to one rather 
than put fifty cents into every thing 
that eomes up. In fact, it might be 
wise for each one of us to pick out two 
or three things which seem strongest to 
ii- and inppoit these regardless of what 
else comes up. At any rate the man 
who fails to contribute to each one of 
these campaigns as they come up should 
In no way feel himself a slacker if he 1* 
doing his best for some other cause, 
for that very reason, student campaigns 
where enthusiasm is worked apaad 
everyone urged to make a iargs contri- 
bution should not he encouraged. It 
often happens that under such condi- 
tions a man makes an unwise decision, 
one that he Is not just tiled in making. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 



Everything in 
Photography 



GHOUPS 

Nash Block 



A. BPECfALTY 



-Good work speaks for itse'f- 

Amherst, Mass. 



p. W. DAVOL 

Instruction on Mandolin 



5 Fairview Ave. Tel. 285-M 



HYDE 



S. S. 

.!«->%•«.• i*-i* *»»»cl Optician 

13 Pleasant Street 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Keplseed. Fine Watch Repair- 
ing Promptly and Skilfully ixine. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



I, Farfitt F. L. Pa to 111 

CROYSDALE INN 

BOOTH HA1H.EY. MASS, 
Luncheons, Afternoon Teas, Dinners 

IHHin Till Mis TO EAT. 
Tel.2tS*-W 



LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Genta* Furnishings Ticket System 

11 AMITV STREET 




The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



O. P. M. is mild, fragrant slow burning, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGUE 

THAT'S WHY IT'S PERFECT 



2-o*. Pan 

4-m. Pan 

«-o*. Can 

M-os, ran 



25 OnU 
50 Cents 
•• Cents 
$1.80 



It Is ABSOLUTELY THE 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PKODUCED 



M;wihi:ii t ur.-il In 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., Boston, U.S.A. 




sMiUKanK cmpAitm fflt, 
Thmugbont lbs euontry in is wtsfc 
an. I during th« wseks U> lolluw will b* 
waged a smlicsgs campaign. In brief. 
ibis Is *seb«nw lu supply the ra«n In 
training mwbs with s uigb class of 
t Btsrtalnnient, frw «f charge. In each 
of tbe Mb«rty theatres located at the 
emitufUBents, Broadway rimipanlwi will 
be wen in tbe !«■«» theatrical IIH'iitllfil 
t»f the seamm, there will a I no be gi»en 
the beet amim-sl and vaudeville pn- 
gravis obtainable, amateur fwrform- 
a 11 res by the men themselves and lect- 
ures oi the highest excellence, huch 
an it ml crt a king means a big expense to 
the gUTernmeni, which in tbe end would 
bate to cows cmt of the men In eamp, 
A* these follows, many of whom have 
dependent* at hum*. h»vi» fery little 
numey to *|>enil on aurli cntiirtaintnsnt*, 
the umiJesge dri*» has been pm umler 
way with the hope* (tint the folks si 
home nay underwrite the scheme and 
afford the h©f» the entertainment they 



CAMPUS NOTES 

On Mondays iha Merthampton 
will run on Sunday schedule. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles E. Marshall en- 
tertained the mem hers of the graduate 
school of the college at their home hurt 
week. 

O.T, Smith *1§ and C. M. Wood 21 
fnrnrsfeed a piano and naxopboite duet 
at special Mrvlees of the I'unbmaii 
church last Sunday. 

W, Latham 17 and H. Msretannt *17 
called at the I'm ted States hotel .Satur- 
day, before the H. A, A, meet, and took 
dinner with the tram. 

l*residenl Butterfield will soon begin 
his promised series of short talks for 
tbe year at chapel and assemblies, tak- 
ing as a background the question of 
democracy in Its relation with the war. 

A feature of le. See, ffi audit Br, 

Mpragne re the formation of corporation* 
among the student*. Ka« ti row bas 
formed some sort of theoretical organi- 
sation for tbe purpose of becoming 
familiar with tbe pro ce s ses of Incorpor- 
ation and operation. 



Jones and Smith^have a good 
many likes in common. Alwayi 
favored the same tailor. 

The other day Jones sprung a 
new one. Said he wm going to 
try Rogers Peet for a change. 

Smith waited outside. 

Do we need to finish the story? 

Highest quality clothing. 

Prices reasonable, 

Fit you see before you order. 



« « 1 1 ea 
ROOKRI 



FILLS* 

Company 



atlstfeSt. 

Hto»dw»» 

st wsrrs* 



YORK n 



Brn*«lwa, 
at SMih St. 

nrtbavs, 

st 41MM. 



Tbe New 

DC LAVAL 

Will. Ul\ ► Vol 

Better Service 
Longer Wear 

LOOK well to SERVICE when yon 
buy a cream separator, it means 
more than anything else. It should 
Include not only a good working and 
reliable machine, but the right sort 
of attention and in tercet on the part 
of the Heller, both at the time the 
machine la Mt up and as long as yon 
continue to use It, He Laval service 
Is well known. You **sn dettend on it. 

Von get more value for your money 
when yom bay a De Laval, becaase— 

as the experience of 1 boii-amN find 
thousand- of tiner* has proved > l»e 
I^val will outwear any other make; 
and It will gl»e you better service 
than any other separator. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



I* BsnAPWAT 

S(W roKK 



f UK Alio 



Northa mpton Players 

"THE CINDERELLA MAN" 



This Week 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



Hurt '10 and Crawford '20 represented 
M. A. ('. at g Conference of the Itilercol- 

lcuiiitc prohibition Association bald In 
Boston last week. The meeting took 
up the ways and means by which col- 
lege men can render the greatest service 
in the prohibition movement. 

The college weather observatory oil 
South College recorded a maximum ve- 
locity of wind at M miles an hour at 
4 v. m. Monday. This was only mo- 
ment ui ily, but gives some idea of the 
reason lor the present nearly Isolated 
condition of Amherst the tirst of the 
week, due to snow drifts. 

Asocial evening was enjoyed by a num- 
ber of the members of the wintet sboit 
course school in the Social Union last 
Friday, reinforced by several oi the col- 
lege otliee stalls. Games started 08 
this get together, followed by dancing, 
This is the second indoor good time 
but several bikes on past Sundays have 
been taken. 

The extreme cold weather and high 
wind caused the scheduled inter- 
class two lap relay races to be postponed 

last Monday afternoon. The pupho* 

ill. .ies welc to IIH ■•! I he illl.'Ia--lIMtU 

and the juniors the Ireshmen. N«\t 
Friday at 4-4d the seniors stall oil 
against lh» freshmen and the juniors 
will try out the unclassified men. 

Aggie's cheering section hi the Dart- 
mouth game, Saturday, consisted of 
••Fritz" Larson '17. He was on hand 
all tbe time, hungry foi news, lie has 
been attending the government or- 
dnance school at the college and ex- 
pects to be shipped either to Bock 
Island, 111., or Uoboken.in three weeks. 
Incidentally be denies hit marriage. 

A very pleasing feature of Sunday 
ehapei services has been the new type 
of music furniihed. Tbe asaortmeni of 
mandolin duets and the wixophone 
with violin, liotb accompanied !>> piano, 
has given a style of music much more 
welcome thsn the "swan" songs of 
former quartets, and may even psrilully 
recompense some men for early rising. 

Tbe extension department «>f the cob 
lege co-operating with the Hsimishlre 
count \ farm bureau will carry on sn 
agricultural and bomemaklng seh.H.l 
In Cnmraington this Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday. Special emphasis in the agrb 
cultural section is to be laid on the 1m- 
portaneeof the live sUn-k industry and 
in tbe bomemaklng Meet loo. A program 
bas been arranged to eover largely 1 he 
qoest tone that are confronting the house- 
holder at the prese nt time in meeting 
the conservation program, 



PROF. PATTERSON TO READ 
The Social Union entertainment for 
Saturday. Feb. i), will be in the form of 
readings by Prof. 0. II. Patterson of the 
English department. Professor Patter- 
son's abililN as a reader is well Unown 
all over the campus,' especially by 

those sophomores and freshmen who 

have been fortunate BttQltgfa fo work 
under him in their English courses, 
lie studied expression in Paris, and has 
taught in the School of Expression at 
Boston. Bis work as a reader and man 
of letters apeaks for itself la the splen- 
did showing made by the M. A.t'. de- 
lating team of last year which he 
cached. Professor Patterson will tend 

the "Merchant ot Vc 1. i.e.' The enter- 
tainment will iasl an hour and a hall. 



THE AIM 



After twenty-five years dose business association with the best dic-Md 
men in your college : 

Tokeepoui lines of young men's togs so utteflj smart and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pleasure to buy tiere, knowing that »e'raarj#cialiifc»«l twenty- 
five yeais' experience. 

Highland Heather, »n unusually smart '* trench " o«rco«t t waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

1 teadquarters lot the 

i Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Ccats, tw«i t at made. 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 




Do You 

Want 

Help? 

Send lor our practical C01 ft 
Bonk. It will help you grow 
more to ibe acre. 

Order your supplies oi 

E. Frank Coe's 

nm 1 h p.. off 

Fertilizers 

now b»r immediate shipment. 
For tivrrsi.xly years they bave 
helped good farmers increase 
their corn profits. Ask for 

price*. 

We « ant more agents. 



At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

Campion's I'.loek, ■ ■ ■ Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 

SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

\e\i lo Cam plan'* 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books t "iinimi. Pens 

Acmti far Hmx Typewriter 

F. «. CUR RAN C. F, liVHR 



I'ulillrttkffl Dtvtiieii 

lie loe • .Mortimer tompain. 

HUlhrr »f lh» AMOTtaM AmtU uHutml 
rtantn 

SI Chamktrs Street, New Tor* City 



" BIDE- A- WEE " 

Cresmed Ctiicken and Wafttes 

Omr SpKUhT— Aod ntlwf 0tm4 t Lihk* t«» «*t. 

MKS. L. M. STI l.BINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley. Man. 

I it, ti;. W 

The Highland Hotel 

(..HUT "f HttliMfl '"..! I'.oin* J.li*«fU. Ifclt* 
lit... Kn fr>iin tin- I »i. i! tii-idit. i» m iimiifin hr»- 

Icliv nil I de Mii.'l" "I. I'liOi 1 1 t« Mint I itcii 

frtmi *liiltif*tr*«H.aw*V fi«"> Hw i'" 1 *' «».l •lum . 
,.t in On> 1 eiiipr iif lh» riii*tn.'Wi ilrtrtrt. 
Ha i,„..i* ;m- wilt riiTnliitM««l»n<l c.ii.ii.itiii.i. 

tiuUiit' a ot. pli.-m- nit ln'1 null Kitil reRNtBI 

water l»«»«tj rMMi. I'll) *• SI RarfMpi wai 
with bub Ulngle $1.50 ami m- 

II* eirellent <-ni*li>i* «nd «#1I veniilmpil "tin 
IBM nmn midM * mi-al i pU-uiui(il iiiihhm 

Mr'|l|llnii.'it ll>^ liinl.en! HMllll ""1 « . • . I «- • t 

ami M»r*e«l t« «t>" l«-' t •»»il'i« Mann*) 

Ml»r«f lli«" ll'ltl'I-" "» Holel ininawl smi *i!1 
;mli<-i|*w" •imllntf *«• a«nln M«»!f- ev^iy 
i-M ntUH. 

D. H. Sievers, 



WELL-KNOWN FORESTER 

WILL SPEAK AT ASSEMBLY 

Ttas iwaUi »p«s%»T for W»diHN<day , 
fto. H. will b» FMflp W. Ayrw «if 
Concord, If. a .. Mi of the Usadins! f«»r- 
«iter» of tba Unl!«d State*, and long 
tdMtlfcd witlt tb« work of f.«rr*t rtrl«- 
mafloB of l»i» own atate, FolliiwlnK hM 
fndnatlon from Cornell in 1W4 Mr. 
\> re* pursiHMl jira«luaif Wofk al Jotinji 
Hopkins rnlTtntty, r«c»i*»nB the «le 
irwof Ph. U. from thEt InMltnti.m in 
I *..,_ Krom 1^ to imf, hr- vas ««'ni«ral 
■wwffiry tot the A^wtaleil Charltie* 
it Clnrlnrtaff, Ohio, and nadesfl'udy 
of rliarlTalile snd penal InMftutlon» in 
Europe In ISM. Since WW tie b»« Ijeen 
forester of the SoeJety for the I*rolec. 
tion of the New Hww^htfe forc«i«. 
Mr. Arret U the ■Bihar of teTcrnl arti- 
cIm on forentrf which have Hpc* ■»•« '' '" 
(he t)n!hmk,*m\ lis* corilribnlC't num. i 

o^ art tel« OB ehi rit y b» I h «• ' i »» • "' " 
seileiH. 



y ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Cheaper Wheat 

Broadcast 100 lbs, of 
Nitrate of Soda per 
acre as a Top Dress- 
ing for Wheat and 
Seeded Crops. 200 
lbs, per acre for Culti- 
vated Crops. 




RAHARS INN 

MMMMIIM 



,n»^H» 




profrteblo Mxi hdp teed cmt 
Armies in fleW? 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

*7 Main Street^ IIssoam IluiWIng, 

NortIiara|itrjn, M»« 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Chnd p/t/v /r«m t A, M, to 4 A, M. 

The HotfOke Valve I Hydrant Co. 



.loliln-H I'f W • 

S .1 I V I > I ••! I ' ' 

I , ... \ »ln «•.■• M 
I i.«.tll'i(» l*i|» 

F.ligi' 
!(••» « ■'• 



Hill 



M rir* 

W»t»»r mm4 
-» »n«I lit* 

It gNtftftlfM 



WIIXIAM S. MYERS, 

25 MadiMB Aremie, New Yeffl 




i 



M,YMOUTH inn 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable- Evtrv 



MARSH'S SANITakY 

Students' Furniture 

KLKIS AND CARPETS 

1 ii. MA 10* II K8TAT1 



!»;», *»i -^»i.*i. iiw**^ 

KPiiKN Lank Fi»io>k. to*. 

HAMICAlTtTKIIill JUHt.l.lilW 

iHtl MmMIiVVAV. NKW YllWK 

. I.I II \NI» COI.l.WIK. 
I'INM ANJJ HINti** # 

imi.ti. mn «•«» <in m»««f«i" Miimt* 

DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

* »«.t«-<l|IMlll 



71 Main St. 



Johnson Book Go. 

A u 1 • i ' • 1 1 ! 1 1 1 n » I BOOMS 

-:- Filing Cases -- 



and Comfortahli 
facility for 



BANQUETS PARTY 

Kuropeau Pica 



BABBITT '18, Manafer 

Alpha Sigma Phi Hottae 

Writing Paper 

Wtts Cass Nwerali and Colltge SiaU 

All klml-of 

Loose-Ipaf Boohs and f I 
Peas, Banntn and 
Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

nd Mationrr 






4 ' 



it 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



I 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



THE DINING HALL 

is offering most attractive board 
to the student body. 

The get-together, songs and 
college life* and good times cen- 
ter about the dining hall. 

. The caflVteria offers a-la-carte 
service. 

The main dining room serves 
monthly board. 



Drop in at 

"YE AGGIE INN" 

Board by w«#K or al-a-carte 
$5.50 

Candy, Tobacco 

Student Supplies 



1*ISCJKAI*A.IV*« 

Candies and Ice Cream 



" IIAJMI* 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

In ruber in protein than moat meats 
and is M'ty nmrli cheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 
Also try our fancy cheese: 



Neufchatel 

Oljve 



Pimento 
Club 



All product! Bade from pasteur- 
ized milk ami cream. 



Dairy Department 

Mass. Agricultural Colleue. 

Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hourm: 1-8, 7-8 p. m, .•sun. lay aiul 
other hours by appointment. 



Run for Aggie Men 

By Aggie Men 



I Unr m -» •» • i » md its*4on«hBT f* " iheuhd 
h«y von 

COAL 
C. R. ELDER 



UMB1A CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

W»lk dawn town and e rente an m%nmM*., 

lhr.« In wlwie Mm ltn«l the piea mother nmke«. 



H E. SPAULDING '19, Maillger Oo«l Service and Reasonable Price* 

School and College photographers . . 



LOG ALLY.' V 




Y. M. C. A. WILL DISCUSS 

NEW WORLD DEMOCRACY 

The V. If. < • A. has started a cam- 
patgO to enlist the Aggie men and 
women in the study of a New World 
Democracy, to train them to be leaders 
in the periods of recount ruction which 
must follow the present great war. 
The campaign here is only a part of a 
nationwide movement which has been 
slatted to prepare lor peace while at 
war. America is nut alone in these 
projects lot reconstruction fur France, 
Itussia and England have already ex- 
tensive plans for the future develop- 
ment of the world. It is the plan here 
in America to get 200,000 college stu- 
dents Interested in this work so that we 
will be assured of trained thinkers to 
carry it on. 

Professor Payne announces that the 
men of the college interested ui this 
movement will meet in groups on .Sun- 
day afternoons probably alter dinner to 
discus the different phases oi the work 
ol world reconstruction along the line 
of Christian principles, At present 
there are 5411 leaders who have volun- 
teered to direct the discussion in these 
groups. Anyone else who has not been 
approached on the subject and is inter- 
ested should see Professor Payne in the 
Y. M. C. A. office. Every student, re- 
gardless of creed or belief, is urged to 
join in these discussions because this is 
a world problem rather than a Y. St. C. 
A. problem. 

The leaders will have a training class 
or discussion among themselves Wed- 
nesday eveninjis m 0-4.1 at the Y. M. ('. 
A. o thee, at which some faculty leader 
will direct the work of the week. Topics 
which have lieeu migge.steil for the first 
four weeks are as follows: The Nation's 
('all. The Personal .Si niggle, A World 
Neighborhood, So t'amouftagfl of 
Uiehes. The leader's meeting for this 
week only, will be held Friday night 
instead of Wednesday night, at 8-4fi, 
At present there are about SAO enrolled 
totakepsM in ihese Islks. As awn 
as the student* realise the value of 
i hi- w-.rk enrollment will undoubtedly 
increase greatly. 



lass 




Batchelder & Snyder Co, 

PACKUKS *NI> POULTRY DRH^FRS 

W14Ut.BlA.l.K f»M V 

Heel. Motion, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon. S*r 
•ages, Poultry. Oame, Butler. Cheese, 
HgM, Olive Oils, 
ill J 

Blacksione, North and North Centre Streets. 
BOSTON, .... HA 



Russell, Bordsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 

WTABLfBtlKl* I 

,5522* EMPIRE "SB,- 



C&rpfivter fir Morchoust, 

PRINTERS, 



M. A. C. FALLS BEFORE 

CLEVER STEVENS FIVE 



MUSICAL CLUBS UNABLE 

TO GET TO HOLYOKE 

The annual concert of the combined 
Musical CIuImi at llolyoke Monday even- 
ing bad to be liideilnitely postponed on 
account of went her conditions. The 
high wind, which blew all day, raised 
havoc with all trolley service, Snow 
plow* were out but were either off the 
track, stranded or snowed under. The 
special, which was to take Ihe clubs to 
Hotyoke was not even aide to leave the 
tarns. At first it was thought that 
"ptings" might be obtained to take the 
men over, but this was given up on 
account of the severe cold and the 
badly drilled roads. As this is one of 
the ino-t popular concerts of the season, 
it is hoped that a new date can be 
arranged. Many Aggie men were plat- 
ning to take in the affair and a large 
attendance was expected. 



Fast Floor Work and Accurate Shoot- 
ing Prove Superior. Score 
46 to 19. 

Playing against the best team they 
have encountered sofartLia year, M. A. 
C. went down to defeat before Stevens 
Institute Friday night at the Drill Hall, 
by a score of 43 to 19. Stevens showed 
such a combination of learn work, speed, 
and accuracy as has not been seeD here 
either last year or this and combined 
with these a great ability to keep away 
from their opponents when carrying the 
ball. In spite of the bard work of Lent 
and Parkhurst, Egger especially of the 
visitors, time and again found bis chance 
to receive the ball almost under the 
Aggie basket, and he rarely missed a 
shot. 

Stevens started off with a rush, scor- 
ing three baskets in almost as many 
minutes, then Whittle dropped in a 
pretty one on a long shot, but Stevens' 
to, wards were too accurate and her 
backs too clever for the M. A. C. aggre- 
gation, the score mounting much faster 
for the New Jersey boys than for their 
op p o nen ts. At the end of the half the 
score was 22 to H, Eg»er having dropped 
in nearly all of Stevens' baskets. 

McCarthy started the second half with 
a long shot for a score, and for awhile 
it looked as though the game waa 
to become close, for Whittle caged a 
couple of pretty baskets, and the 
Stevens men seemed to have slowed 
down. They soon started again, though, 
and the half was featured by Hedden's 
dashes down the floor, by which he 
ringed five baskets. 

Whittle and McCarthy got some good 
shots, but the all round excellent play 
of the Stevens team was the feature of 
the game. 

■TKVTSJtB laSTITlTTK, M. A. C. 

Bieseuberger, rf If, (apt. McCarthy 

Egger, Capt., If c, rf, Whittle 

i .u .-on . e if. Harrington 

LaPointe, rb rf, Lothrop 

lit une, rb e, Blanchard 

lle.lden. lb lb, Lent 

rb, Park hurst 
Score- Stevens 46, M. A. C. IV. Goals 
—Egger ", Klwenberger 6, Uedden 6, 
Whittle 4. McCarthy 1, Carlson, La- 
Pointe. finals from fouls - McCarthy 5, 
Egger 2. Referee— Swaflleld of Brown. 
Timer - Dickinaon. lime MMaiaate 
halves. 



FORECAST 1918 



No l ( 



Amherst, Mas* 



A diMfc of «fr#»ry 

■Hi, Mar 111 »li(lit. 
V r..jiil i.f ft.rtrn rlmt, 
A ski. |mrtnit««n». nrnf. 

Ami SMHli II'i' night* 

\ rfurftl i ly deep, 

ah rks tfoiif. 

t 4 «i„rni -it mii.w ** billed »weee. 
A turtle nfih wind and sleep. 
And thee, tfc» dawn ! 

riM»s FHKJrricK HASP. 

This poem by Professor Band of 
the English depart men! appeared In 
the Sunday HeyNfrffeitn. It is good 
enough to be reprtnled In the Col- 

L KOI AH. 



LECTURE ON CAMP DEVENs 

The "Bearing of a City In Forty 
Days," was the way in which Mr. 
(ioggin of the Fred t. Ley Company of 
Springfie ld described the erection of 
Camp TJe vens, at the Social Union en- 
tetiainmeut in the old chapel last Sat* 
unlay evening. Mr. fJoggln illustrated 
his talk with a series of excellent slides 
showing step by step the erection of the 
S42 buildings comprising the canton- 
ment, as well a* illustrating the stu- 
pertdous engineering feat of pulling in 
a water system consisting of is miles of 
pipe, and the installing of a heating 
system to heat Hi acres of floor space. 
The efficient methods employed by the 
government and I he constructionists in 
the building of the camp were well 
shown by the views, and the lecture 

rmight out clearly the way lit which 

task 
g me large 
number of men called to the colors, 



the government is going about the I 
of raring for and training the li 



Wine fraternity houses at Williams 
have been forced to shut down on 
account of lack of coal. 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 

Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
"dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 




MERRITT CLARK & CO., 



144 Matn Street. 
Northampton. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Beach, Lincoln and Kingston Bta , 
BOSTON, HASS. 



Only two block! from South Terminal Bu- 
tton, and easily reached from North Kta'.lnn 
l>y Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail shops and business centre, 
also to the theatres and plarea of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and service unsurpassed. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

Southern Cooking Popu- 
lar ! Well, I should 
say so ! ! 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



LETTERS FROM AGGIE MEN 

IN CAMP AND ABROAD 

[Editor's note: In this column will lie 
published weekly, letters of extiarts 
from letters, from the Aggie men at the 
front.] 

France. Dec. 23. 

As some of you know, I lirst went to 
l'lattsliurg, ami limling that loo lame, 
jumped to aviation, spent six weeks at 
ground school at M. I. T., and there to 
flying school at Mineola, where my ele- 
mentary training started. You little 
know how much real pleasure one can 
derive from Hying alter the lirst scares 
are over. 

I passed as a Reserve Militarv \ viator, 
recommended for ;i First Lieut., hut 
was shipped before my final papers 
name through. The trip over waa quite 

devoid of adventure; we traveled lirst- 
class and enjoyed it all, thinking little 
of war and caring less. We landed in 
England, and altera week's stay, during 
which we had a most enjoyable time, 
we started for France. We all were glu- 
riously sick crossing the channel, hut 
only for a day. After touring for two 
days by rail, we landed at a large Ann-r- 
ican flying school in the central part. 
How thankful 1 am for the bit of French 
l'rof. MaeKinimic suit of thrust upon 
me. and it lias been a circus trying it out 
on the French people. 

Here 1 am piloting fast French ma- 
chines, and it's real ifOlt »« a «y of ,ln " 
old boys will nay. 1 cannot take my 
daily ileep while scudding through the 
air in one of these busses, but I like the 
game, and am truly (haukfu! thai I 
same into it. 



PLAZA 



on. 



Mas*. 



Where the Best 

Photo-Play 

Features ... 



Are shown. 

M tMANC.FO 



ft H. Baw m k 

U. 8, Air Sendee, 

A. K. K.. France. 



17, 



Fort Ogletl 



», Ga M Jan. 16, 1918. 



We bad some trip down here, Uft 
New York Friday BOOO, got stuck In a 
snowstorm in Ohio for a whole blooming 
day and arrived here in the rain Have 
been here two days now, The older 
men say this is typical weather, it Is 
cold enough for overcoats all day. 
Anybody that says anything nhouf the 
Sunny South Is ■ darn liar. 

We live In tents, eight men to a teat 
and drill all day until they are able to 
find oat what we are worth. During 
the day the froe* melts and the ima 
warms It up a bit. 

( ovlsv.1. I.tKBKR *18 



Out of their Own Mouths 
TH EY 

ARE CONDEMNED 



Here is a protest of a German soldier, an eye- 
witness of the slaughter of Russian soldiers: 

' It was frlifluful. IH-Hrtrenillnir. a. tbese 
in i--i - of human belnirs wen- driven to ile- 
atructiiin. Above tin- terrible thunder of the 

cannon caaM be heart the heartrending cries 

oftlie Russians: 'UtTuutaasI o Prussians!' 
but there was no tuerey. Oin eftptata had Ol 

iietiit The whole lot m tut ate: ■orepWflr*.'" 

It is only because mir French and British 
allies have held the line that such horrors 
have nut been ■fttneMed in New England. 



The Third Liberty Loan 

lets you help defeat barbarism 

TO BUY 



LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE OF NEW ENGLAND 
Liberty Building, Boston 








THE DAVENPORT 

ke stopping place b.r "Aggie" B»«- 

A new, modern house with every coi 

AFTER-SUPPER PARTIES, BANQUETS, He 



Mrs. J. K. W. Dwm 



Pleasant si. 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 



Drugs 



Cigars 

Candy I^ 

Mais. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

m— William H. Craighead af Harris, 
bnrsr, Pa., who has been manager 
of a publishing and printing plant for 
tbe pa*t nine years, was one of Hfty-twii 
Y. M f N. workers whn sailed for 
france recently from an Atlantic port 
for the piirp.««- »( taking up Aaaoeiaiion 
work among the stndents, 

*».— Benjamin ¥, Hubert Is tbe 
author of an emteuslve and well in- 
formed extension service bulletin of 
tbe tooth Carolina Agricultural and 
Mechanical colletfe. entittcil "Agrlesl- 
ttirc and the Itural m. lornl", in which he 
ili^iismes ai wmic length the different 
phases of the work. 

10. ~B. C 1* Haniler i« *•§■* 
aMistint to the head gardener on li ■■'■■• 
I^h. estate of l'rof. Charles S. Harsent, 
line. He was recently admittp.l 

[he ctittrse io rejrl mental euppitea, 
given nnder the au»p.«c« of 
uate mttm\ rf bnsi 
at Harvard. 



Insure Your Crops and Your Profits 



Write pKloy f«if |» 



on 



adniiBlwt ration 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1857 «•■«»■—' 



hrMrtHf. 1917 



Ask Fw Off Crop Botfs, Wi Will Reliable AfMts in Unoccup^d Terrilory 



a 



Aililreaa <%*£«-• iso.-v Miiniigei 



THE COE-MORTIMER COMPANY 



sij^tdterr «t rte AWftan A«rie«JtBmi t Hamleal in 

§t chambEoS mm * - • mimmr 






i> 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1918. 



II 



FRATERNITY RELAY RACES 
STANDING OF THE TEAMS 

In thf itilerfraternitv relay laees Fri* 
day Alpha Sigma l'hi wmi front Tbeta 
('hi, while AlpliaHummu 10m and Kappa 
JSiKina won from Lambda < hi Alpha and 
Q. T. V. respectively. Tin- race between 
Kappa UaiS 038 Phi and Sigma Phi Kp»i- 

luii was forfeited in tin' former because 
of failure of Sigma Phi Bpatlot to pre- 
sent a team, 

in the first race, that between Alpha 
hiynia Phi and Tbeta Chi, Brown u<»t a 
better start than Graves and banded a 
five yard lead t.» Burns, who maintained 
this advantage. Sloan sueeeded in 
catching Haslam ami then opened up a 
ipiarter uf a lap lead whleh Coder re had 
no difficulty iu increasing over Timdl. 
The time was 2: IP 14 

H, Lyons led Crawford in tin- Alpha 
Gamma Uho-Konibda (hi Alpha race 

and yave a guild lead In .laktiiiaii \v ho 
increased this over Cooper so that 'lay- 
lor had ten yards to the good over Hard, 
This resulted in a preltj laee in which 
Kurd drew up to and passed bin mas 
thus giving live yard* to Hrsty over L. 
Lyons, the distance that Uray held IfVet 
Lyons at the final Hue. This was the 
fastest race of the afternoon, the time 
being 2.17. 

In the Kappa Blgma-y. T. V. conies 
Alger banded the nix yard lead that he 
bad taken from Hall, hi Stock bridge 
who increased this to a quarter lap owi 
Zen her. Pntlt succeeded in culling 
down this lesd but was unable to eaten 
Cook who gave Wright a considerable 
advantage <» VBr Wiliiams, The time 
was slow Kappa .Sigma winning in 
1:41 i-fl. 

The standing of the teams to dale is 
as follow*: 

ITee, I-.hu 
i 
■ 


1 

1 
I 



, 



VARSITY RIFLE TEAM TO 

ENTER INTERCOLLEGIATES 

First Match to be f- hot February 23, 

Several Good Men to 

Choose From, 

Tlie varsity title team has been eu- 

tered in the indoor Intercollegiate ritle 

matches for this year. The prospects 

for u high elan combination should be 

bright for there me available several 
men from (be junior class who have 
had some experience on last year's 
teams and at i he same time other col- 
leges have undoubtedly lost as many 
title men as M. A. C. 

Kcaililiauon papers and lees liavi- 
been sent in and the first maleh is 
scheduled lor Feb, XI but the college to 
he matched up against in the 50 yard 
indoor routes' is not yet known. A 

feature of this years eon'ests will he 
the award Of a so railed "IM) per eeni 
medal" to be given every competitor 
who makes an average individual record 
oi tMt per Beat, \li matches will be 
shot prone and it is in this game l bat 
it, A. <'. men are best versed having 
bad considerable practice. Those who 
will shoot on this dale will be Can let I 
1* leapt,), Taylor, Parsons, V. < allanan 
and Sweeney Tlh The annual sopuu- 
more-ln -simian title niateh lias no! yc! 
been run ott and must he either com. 
plated or forfeited before the dale of 
the opening of the varsity contests. 



i Fastest tune. 



l 

1 



l.tHMt 

I .WX) 
1.000 

.otaj 
.500 
.500 
.WW 
IKMI 
,(WU 



a.i»M-6 

S.lf 
BM 

-.* h i :. 
4,24 
2,5» 4-6 



Tsatu 
K % 
k r ■fr- 
eSh' 

ATP 1 

A I A 1 

AI* 1 

1*1 2 

Q. T, V\ 2 

HX g 

The races scheduled for Monday 
were postponed on account of th. 
t rente cold weather. The races for Fri- 
day are I*hl Sigma Kappa vs. Tbeta Chi ; 
Kappa Sigma vs. Kappa Clamma I'hl: 
y. T. V. vs. Slgtna Phi KpaHnn. tin 
Monday, Feb. II, Kappa Hamma Phi 
no e is Lambda (hi Alpha; while Tbeta 
(hi and Sigma l'hi Kpsilon meet Alpha 
tianitua Hho and Alpha Sigma I'hi 
respectively. 

MAGNITUDE OF WORLD WAR 
SHOWN BY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

A short but estretnely intertstJBg 
address was given the students at 
chapel Monday noon by Kdward Brown 
of Knglaml, who was here hart »timmer 
for pool try work. He rein r " i le 1 up- 
land aud now \m BM»in In » !r *l 
He sfK»ke tin " Are we worth lite nert>] 
lice" in wMrt he ment 
ami Friullslt »it»i« In 
"liver i«Kt,i*«! KniiiMii!.,.it ami 1 »aA - 
|,' ri ,,. I,,-. I) k 
imiii * < lat «■ uhIh- 
tt|« it it«« llf.i »ii i- if it" 
Inn all lit"' huffiin ..f *itr,.nir H*,W0,O0t 
lives had been m taking til i 
i . ..'mi all the K'» ot men, 
Women and children. " II»> «-i!ed per» 
Mttiutl e»|ierletires while on ahtpbt 
Inst fall when a torpedo missed i. | 
vessel by 16 fe*M, Nearby a vewl enr- 
pylng nitrBOH went down with a hwts ot 
IM lives. While in l.mtd.nt he was In 
If air raids by (Jiniii, 



POMOLOGY CLUB OFFICERS 

The Pomology club elected I be fol- 
lowing olitit-rs tor the year, at a meet- 
ing held last limrsday in Fretieb Hall: 
President, Paul Faxuuof Sewlon; vice- 
prasidcut. Ualph T, tloweol Melrose; 
secret at? and treasurer, Klcbard U. 
Hart well of Springfield. As soon as 
some new members can be obtained 
from (he Sophomore elans, cotttmitiees 
will be appointed. 



SHORT YEAR CRITICISED 

IN DISCUSSION AT FORUM 

At tlie student luiuni. held in lieu of 
the regular assembly exercises* last 
Wednesday, the question of the past, 
present, and future length of the college 
year was taken up and discussed. Pres- 
ident I.anpbear of Adelpbia opened 
the forum by citing some aneient his- 
tory OO&Cerniag the town Of Amherst. 

Uulliun 'IP was the first speaker, and 
Kaher '211 .supported his statements. 
Both men were in favor of the old 40 
week, two term system, but ottered as a 
direct remedy In the present 30 week, 
three term system, one which would 
still he of 86 weeks in length, but would 
only have two terms of 15 weeks each. 

A latge number el men commented 
upon the present sit nation, few of whom 

were favorably Inclined toward it. 
I'taciically every speaker complained 
of the presen i -day cramming, uncom- 
pleted courses aud the "agricultural 
bash" that Aggie is now enjoying in the 
gubte of agricultural education. Burt 
IP reminded the student body of its 
obligations to the boys "over there" aud 
the tacrine** which Aggie men must 
make fur their sake. The discussion 
occupied practically the whole hour, 
aud was not eioeed at the time limit. 

Among Of hell who s|ndie were Lyons, 
Uanlleli, ( haptuaii.'l'ilton, Foley, Bruce 
U»l»; (allanan. Blanchard.lioyee.Balch- 
elder, Faxon UUh; and Smith, Ball, 
Uohcrtson, Campbell, I rawtord 10S0, 

The Dartmouth winter carnival, 
which in the past seven yean has be- 
eoineihe most important athletic and 
social event of BMOVWf undergraduate 
tiii-, has beeu Indefinitely called off by 
Ibe (tuting Club. The u cling of the 
Council was expressed in the ■(element 
thai in view of the serious situation in 
regard lofnsl and food it would be both 
Inadvisable and inappropriate to hold 
the carnival ihU winter. 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 
CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 

— AT— 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We cany the latgest .stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Aftiociate Alumni, C. A. Peteri, Se€reUry=454 W 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, F. A .McLaughlin, Secretary— 43*-R 



MOUERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMA* 



CARS 



M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Nofl-Aihleiie Aiaociailott. 

I he College Senate, 

Track Aaaaeiauon, 

I loekey A ssoc U tion, 

llasketball Ansiui.ilion, 

Ftwtball Association, 

Rifle I !ub. 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred N'tttefeen Intlex, 

M, A, C, Christian Asioctafion, 

Fraiernitv Confe fence, 

IntereUiM Alhtetic Committee, 



II 



C. S. Hicks, Treuurer— 403-M 

E Robbins, Manager— res, fit-W 

II I.. Ruuell, Freaideat— 416 

C. G. Mittoon, Manager— 8jj&-W 

R. B. Collins, Acting Manager— 83 $6 

J. A. Chapman, Managtr— S314 

S. W, lUtcheWar, Manager— 8364 

F. H. Canlett, Fr«»tdettt— 8338-W 

M. F. Evan*. Manager— S347 

E. M. Buffura, Manager— 1338- W 

R. L, Boyd, Freaident— 416 

H. U Russell, Pre»d«nt— tif-R 

John Yeaalf, S«TCtary— 8346 



M. A. C. for Holyoke 7« aid hourly 
until 1 iiQ P, M, 

M. A C for Amherst 6-*o, 6-4$, y-20, 7 S°- 
S«j. 8 jo, then M »iB. mud 35 mm. 
after the hour until 10 20 P, H, Other 
can. at u-50 A, m„ 350. 5 ^e, 7-50,9-50, 
10-50 e. M , dud a U-t car at n-re i* at 

AmherM for M. A. C. 605. frje, then 
half hourlv until H 00 A. M,, 8 15, o-tj, 
then 15 min. and 30 mm, alter the hour 
uittd 11 30 P. m. Other car* at i«©e 
noon and 400, 6 00, 8 00.10 ©0 P. M. and 
a UjM car *\ 13 30 P M. 
Cart M 



Ml RSI I SUNKRIAND ST. RV. CO 



! IMPORTED HOSIERY » 



Fw(Uif, 
m A' 



ami Sport Wear 
,iivk tnxsidS"* ton. 

A!»iD WOMEN 



Amherst Co-op. Laun 





High-Crude Coll*||« Work 

... » l#*l4c 

1 «ill«r». - - * tl^ 

1 l-f c 

i ;.i 11 Uiiph, - |»fdi«. Ifc 

Purr)!! fi.iiijli dry . per d»»r,. 




Dry 



I*r% ( 



!m*,Ibh ^tet n antta fur ibM 
i» and Prvwfn**, tUI a Suit 



411 wita imr»M» « rnltaee 
tfeere wilt r#r«I*» |»f»»nip» «tl»ntl»m. 



7, Alpha SI ni Pm H tarn ; F. E, CoL«,Ja. , ae t College Sten, 



rfV»IV rrt T. ftrtm. Mmrti, hutthrt »«4 | E§ 

•kMC ««h Mlaf til .-uJv.. • pur . ■ ''" 

W©. I5h «r»^, -«r. 1~«» M44CA] 
i«M«(tlftm twf t»i. ■ pMt ...... *»•• n 

Ma. an w™«'t itrjuh ••* 'wtim. m 1 

no. aw tin*, *»«* »ni «Mrt 1 aa 1 

CaMptNi a wCw t, Tawfc ••• ap ori »yt| w»«t. ■• 
425 FIFTH AVIU f*t Itlh £ * 



M 








FEB 141918 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, Febru ary 12, 1918. 



No. 16 



VARSITY LOSES FAST GAME 
TO NEW HAMPSHIRE FIVE 

Final Score 25-20. Anderson Stars 

With Six Baskets From 

Floor. 



TERM EXAMINATIONS TO 
BEGIN TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

Schedule Allows tor Half Holiday 

Friday, Feb. 23. New Term 

Opens Feb. 25. 



PURINGTON HAS NARROW WFLL KNOWN PI* NIST TO 

escape from tuscania G jy E CONCERT ON SUNDAY 



\ mile hard liu-k on the pan "I tin 
haakethall lf«M »' OartMMn B«t»fd«y 
teattlted in tin- toaaof the game to the 
New 1 1 ;i tit i>^t«i r<- <iuini<-t. byaaooreol 
S5to80. Tha teaina «■"• »* f l •*•■*» 
Biatehed, and lor aeveral mluuten aft« 
,,iav neaaneneed ao aeow «•• wade hj 
either *lde, eaeJi aMtalBg i" tig aati 
keep t>i«* otlii-i ir.tin maUlim a Wui*ki-i 
rather than endeavoring to ieow tbesi' 
>( .| W > aftei wm iniiniii's' 1.1 play, 
however, Bntlei ..1 K U. eoaaedtad with 
the hoop, and lieOactbj alio caw aeroaa 
nhortiv aftenrafda with ■ haakel t"« M. 
\ r s.w Bantpahtre «•<.«•.! three 
more bawkfin iUIpi parted, and CabftlftM 
■hoi tw«K..aU friiiii foula, l>» ! McCarthy 
In tin* form iiihI played il»fl»aH 
inrat.'h Ave thin-* fr.mi 1 tic Mil Inn*, 
tinu thf MOM 1" t'« " at tin- f»«l «>» 
the ttrtt belt. 

The eeeowd ha4i comaieneed In mm •»• 
tin- itaine manner, but t..wai«i tl««- •*• 
i».tb team* opem-.l np their irtyleof 
pJay. and nearly every point tenulted 
from h»»it «hol». Innumeritlilf tlmea 
the ball, when »bot by Whittle, w-ubl 
clrrle around Ibtj ring and dropoff on to 
the tl.M.r, ituilor.on Ibe contrary, made 
three pretty, long ibota mbirh were 
really the deciding factor of the game 
The big Sew Hamp«htre center. Wider 
mi, waa their hhlheet P«»ni winner 
entrinffHtrf the 10 ba«ket». The baJI 
remained in JJ. A. V. territory a large 
pan .d the lime, the team woffc excelled 
that of Hew Hampahlre, and the »iMof 
the kmi *aa due merely to bard luck 

•bom. 
The line np : 

MW HAMIttlUIW. " % ' 

Butler. If lf,Mc*'arthy.c» M t. 

tab»l.net:apt..rf rf. Wl.it tic 

JWtdemm,* e. Hlanrlmnl 

Mhultlwwirftb.lb H.. 1'erkhur*. 

r^_ t »u lb, I*nt 

|hi»i*. rb 

gnn Hew Hamrmblre m, M. A. C. 
m, Ooa!« from tb*>r - Hutler 4. And»r« 
m^m », tlahalan* U Met i art by «. Park^ 
burnt 1, Whittle «. f^hi I"* foul 
ttAalane 4. MHarthy 8. Hefewr 
l »rlingnflp«u«BeId. Tlmw-MeHill^ 
Iworere fhapmaa and Wh te. Time- 
».minule haitea. 



Former Graduate Student is Saved by 

Pair of Oars. In Water 

Three Hours. 



It 



Tbev«*i«y retaj !•«■ win r «" M ' I 

T atth^ W«ti U««ai>i»«-«» \rm..r>. I 
Hewton .treet, Bcnrton. m W«*J 
night, Feb. 10. Thi. h to l*»*" 
army-mwr meet ,n.l the Amt'e L^ 
f»ee will be nndrr the H. f). T. 
■ection. 

I>r and Mm. Henry T. Pernatd ha" 
B rrived In Um An^elr-.Cal.. where the* 
will spend the reaiatwiei' •* **• wt" 1 * 1 "- 



l-'inal axwilaattona fur the s» ml 

leriii will iieuin Tuesday boob, Kei». LI 
ami continue antll r*ridaj booo, 
Feb. --. Th« eiama will be run off Ihe 

MRS M laal term, ea.li period lantinu 
\i 1 -J !i.. 111- wiili lit minute inlet val« be- 
tween l%.ll..wiliu is aeomplete lift ot 

,i,,. K abjeet« and the m *'» wbieh 

tbt-y ate held : 

ft tM-\% . I'l ». 1». 
ItHl to Ml I*. m. 

Krem h U, f, H. <" 
Supervision Special, 8. II. H" 
i miliar) >iiiMUT r>j »od7fl Vet. I.. 
tjuphomore Surveying V, I.. M 
Freshman Tactic*, l>riil Hall 

t-SOtM fl-*' f >. 
|'.,m..l..iry T«. F. B, I 

Ftorlcnllure tW, F. H. <* 
Ban) Kimliieering It, W, I.. M 
Trigonometry, Prill Hall 

\\ 1 list M»\Y, Kku. 20, 

-,-m totMr» %. u. 
IMi»,l .tin l'iliw.v •*, P. H. F 
Agricultural Kdncatlon W, 9, H- H» 
Sii|ili..iii4»re Animal llm-bamiry *s.K,l„M 
Freshman French and German, ln»H llsli 

U-.Vi to ll-iu 
Baglisb :.t. s. II. ll«» 
Chemist ryftt, t hem, l.ab. 
Rural .»«Mi..l«.k*v ~". r*. II. V 
SSoologJ 7*1. K. I*. I> 
Physies». in-ui Hall 
!3hembitry a and B, f bum. Ub. 

\-M tai-lA P. M. 
Animal Hiifluwdry W, ». H, 110 
FbTU'iiitnreM, F. H. 1 

JUlmdikdogJ M. M- H I*'*. 

EuuttOllfi a»d Nm*. VS. H. H. 8I« 
Sophomore Krcin-h ami ticrmatt.K.H. F 

Fr«bman KiialwhUfill Hall 
%^lob^H', u 

Animal Huslmmlry T«. ». M. 

Kl.iriiiilHire m. V, H. % 

ih,inn\ M, < U I 1 

M mdrtology W. Micro. l*b. 

Veierinafy 61. ^ '« H 

Agrtcultural KdtteattonM, 

Ih-awlng W. K. H • 

l in ilu gy £, t *rt»i Hal! 

IIHMM.U, FKtt. SI. 

7^1 ti»#-4ft a. u. 

k ililc'* "JO, til I 

,.y-fl. V. U B 

tieimanW. F. H. t» 
i;n!(itt»ob»gy TT. H '*• K 
Markf-t i.Btdeniria Wl, t. If. K 
SI ibemati«el«». H. 14 
Sophomore Tin -..- 2.1, 1ml Hall 



James AIhuii Puringlon, who waa do- 
ing gradnaie work ai the euUege the 
1 past year, was one ol th« inrtdvoranl 

1 he fatal traiiH|iun Tuseania. which was 

torpedoed and sunk several days ago oil 
! tat eoaal "t iieiami. Fiiriagtoii aa« 

I lisled ill the sitviee last I leiellilul in 
I \llihersl. lie was liisi asMuneil lO the 

iSOth Fonetrj B aglB as ra , as ■ BMhti 

of Ibe loth Itatlalioii. Later he was 

transferred tuCo. D.nl tbeftfe Italia) 

inn, which was on Its way aceuas. Bj a 

peculiar citeaawrtaBee, hhi BBltatateat, 

a|.|.aienll>. Win* not lei led Willi I he 

local board, as he la one ol tbeOlaael 
n„ii .ailed fot ph y a ieal exaaalaatloa la 
town on Tuesday. 

I'uriugtoB embarked in one of the 
Tusi snia's small bout*, imt it waavvei 
turned heli»ra baldly leavlai IbaaMp, 
tin. .wnii; us tu ni mure oeeapaBta into 
il,, water. Itv gfMt good Iwk, •'«' 
man.mi'l '«> grMP I pair *>l oars ami 
i tiim.ell allnat i..rttin-e hourn be- 

fore helni rawatd. Toll la r.-mark- 

al.le. eniisiibriim IB* e*lremi- eold 
weather and the leaipafatBtB ot the 
water, Thi» U the seeoad narrow i-«- 
rape be was had within I year, A few 
month* ««_».. he *a« m ■■ aiilouiobile 

joeideui in Manchester, H. B., «» win. h 

one man !«*• hi* bt«*- 

I'uritigton gr.oliiaied from New 
Hampshire state College In lt*ia\and 
ban been at M. A- I-. since that time 
doing graduate work in Ibe agronomy 

Jdeiiartment until he eultstwl last l*- 
cemljcr. 



Mr. Ralph Havens of Boston. En- 
tertainment Scheduled for 3 
P. M. in Old Chapel. 

The Social Ualon eBtertalattant laa* 
da% afternoon al 8-60 P. ». la "i«" o| d 
ehapel promises t . > he an Innovation in 
the sequence ol sueh entertainments at 
Aggie, The attraction will be Balph 

( Havens ol I'.osloii. toiieell phwltt. 
Mi. Havens is well known in ureal -r 
Huston as a talented and aide musieian, 
but has never appeared In Western 

■taaeaehanetis as an entertainer. The 

,-.,iir. it will he uiven on a Mawm and 
Hamlin uraml l-iauo wlii.h Mr Havenn 

«UI bring with bin. snob tn's nasi pre 

M-nt iheii soiial union eiiiei tatnmenl 
tiekets at the do,u or pay the usual 
pries of admission. 

HONOR ROLL 

Graduates and Former Students. 
( laas 



Tntiit III 

Mrrtcs. 



«»maiissl»iieil Niiiiitn'1 
<iHm.i« l»ver»*n-. 



Ill 



», II H» 



RETURN Ghm WITH W. P. I. 

The W. **. I live, delealed by Agule 
M to M early In the season oh their 
home tbN.r.wlil bmraey to Ambemt .h»i- 
urday b.r a return latne with the 
Maroon aud While quintet. The Wor 
eealer aggreaaHoii put up a strong fl»{hi 
agaln»t (he M \ ' tcamonibeir h-.n.. 
■urface, in their II ml igawe of the season, 
and with the #Ji»enenee of the canws 
raptaln Ku-hncr'it men have played 
since, they shwttM N able to make the 
Aggie five eatend itself to (he limit. 
The game will be called at ?m 
The probable ino-up. 



l»5fl) 

I'.tM 
IUIH 

iwn 
ieia 
una 

1U14 
IM1U 
tHfl 
1U11 
1010 
iwrti 

1WH 

I won 

IBUfi 

1000 

iMrT 
UM 

IM 

xtm 

1M1 

i«t* 



w. t*. 1. 
Stoaghltm, it 
1 apt 
I Krit'Moii, ■ 
Mosaberg, rg 
McCaffrey. Itf 



M, A. f 

rg, 1»artbnnit 

lg, Ijcnl 

e. illaiM'harrt 

H. Met -art by 

rf. Whittle 



*4 

m 

48 

W 

2fl 

m 
m 

A 
I 
I 

4 

a 

• 

1 

1 

1 

1 

s 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 



1 

4 

a 

M 

n 
I 
7 
■ 
IS 
I 
I 

a 
s 

1 

1 
1 
1 



■i 
■1 



o 

If 

10 
I 

5 

a 
4 
a 
s 



i 

i 
1 



Karat Baa 

M, 11 *it til 

Rami See 
Agraaowi 

( hemUtrv 

,.iiiii'« 

Bagllsh » 



to IMl 

,a".* H. 110 

.!,„ UK is, f, B. m 

», P II F 

-s,S. II. 11s 
. Ub. 

n. K I.. M 
, in 11 Hall 

taaaatl 



4;y, 113 «• 

C. H. BREWBI AT ASSEMBLY 

f . H. 'Herb) Hrewer 13 gave a shot! 
talk at aj»M*i»ibl> IV 1 ilnaadlJ on BBM 

,.t ttie ptiininmi ofMaoBfcMfMrtawebMji 

Istry Mini the i BflpOTtaBCl ol idicmlsl ty 

and aarleiiitur" la Ibe auwaaalol pwa»a- 

■•titloli "I Ho- w,,l ' I !»• ' bemUI. "■■• -i 
Mr. Brewer, "h t '• -* a« Import**! as H ■•■ 
wildier l»eran»e he make* the Materials 
With wblrll thpwddier liEbt." 1 be B| 

AOOIE «t»«lT AT HAMP. aattanslIlM »»» 'he Held » f m.ln.t.ii 

\ Mmmd %, Au0r NiRbi" will l«*. held ■ ( lM>n|U(ry Wf , rr alw( pointed ..u< While 

in Northam]««'<n Tfiursdiy efeolni; bj n | , (llh , ttH \j r- HreweT ww an athlete of 

M«w Parker « daneitiK cia**, Th«- H ^^ ^^ p u T i, lg .... Ifet MMHj bMI 

Kimbtnattori of the rollege orrbesfra ^^ ^ ^^^ ,„,„,, \\,. |. gj ,.,, m 
I will I'irtii'h "HMbl wlrirh l' r " % "'^ '" ,.„, rm p| yad by the Harren Ormpant 
,...,.., iar last time. Uanelng fnor. , -*• |>( Sf , w Yl , rk ,,,.,,,,,1^,, „,,.,« „f MrversI 
i.. Hi;wi. Plenty ol girl* for all. 1 w#1 , known c beii,..»l gfolMcfl, 







i 



•A ">] 



1/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday. Feb. 12, 1918. 



ADDRESSES OF THE AGGIE 

MEN IN NATION'S SERVICE 

For some lime there has been felt a 
strong need for a complete list of the 
addresses of Aggie men in service. The 
following are the addresses as they 
have reached the President's of&Ofl <>r 
other sources on the campus. Several 
changes will be made in these columns 
as corrections are reported. Included 
in this great Aggie service list are 18 
men commissioned with a rank higher 
than lieutenant. Of these three are 
majors and 15 captains. The complete 
list, arranged by classes and corrected 
as nearly as possi ble to date is as follows : 



1878. 
Hall, Joseph H., Physician Capt., 
M. O. R, ('., at Forts and cantonments 
for U. 8. Army,, Denver, Col, 
1881. 
Chapln, Henry E., Capt. on reserve 
list for commissioned officers, Rich- 
mond Hill, X. V. 

188§. 

Barber, tieorge U., U. 8. Naval Hospi- 
tal, Fort Uyous, Col, 

Coldthwait, Dr. Joel E,, Major, Direc- 
tor of Military Orthopedics for the A. 
«,«. France. 

1891. 
Magill, Claude A., Senior Service 
Corpe, New Haven, Conn, 

18W. 

Seals, A, T., Photographer making 
■eries of rejected men at Navy Recruit- 
ing Station 34 K. 23d .Street. N. Y. 

Davidson, H. <>., ex-'»g. Mupt. Military 
and Normal Academy, Lake (ieneva, 
Wli. 

taerson, Henry B.. working on Got't 
orders. Recruited and drilled company 
of State Guards, Uwrence, Mass, 

Lyman, Richard P., Veterinary ex- 
aminer forO. K. ( ., Vet. He^erve, Stat 
Laming, if fob. 

1896, 

Drury, Ralph W., «-"M. Captain 
Nft Infantry A, K, F. Fraoce. 

I'-tier. Daalel C«, S'olunteer oh##rw 
on the ooaat, Fairhavcii, Maw. 

Stearns, Harold E., id Lieut. Vet, o. 
U, tt Remount Depot, Fort Royal, Va. 
1896. 

Cook, Allen B„ Capi. MMdlebnry Co. 
Conn, Home Quartl. 

Pool. Erford W.. 1st Lieut, serving 
ai Battalion Adjutant, 1st Battery, 17th 
Begt. Ma»*. State fluard, New Bedford, 



PenlecoBl, W. L., Bern, Salesbury 
third, Battalion C, Coon. Home Guards, 
Taconia, Conn. 

Eddy, John R„ 9 %4fi, Co. IS, Infan- 
try, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Howell, Arthur M„ m-97, Capialn, 
O, R. c, Quartermaater't Section, 
Honolulu, H. T. 

1SW, 
DaTl», J. Allen, Sergeant Co. M, 90th 
Beg. Mmi, State Guard. 
1800. 
Hull, Edward T., Physician E*efnp- 
t Ion Board Draft Army. 1M W, l»tb 
Streef, New York City. 

Monabin, Arthur C, Major Surgeon 
G«Mr»ri Wept, National Army. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1W§, 
Paal, AngmUun R., f 'apt, «f DefiiBK 
Unit of Belvid#r», known as Co, A, of 
j«t Corps of Caditflof If, J, 

190(8. 

Talt, William (),, l«t Ideal, (V,, D. 
(W)Taoneit f H*«. State Guard. 
MOT, 

Chaae, Wayland F,, Co. 11, R. n. T. 
U. Military Braaob,Chattanooga,Te««. 



Curtis, Jesse C, Application on file 
for service with 10th Reserve Forest En- 
gineers, U. 8. A. 

Peters, Fred C, Lieut. 320th Field 
Artillery, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga. 
1908. 

Barry, Thomas A., Capt. Field Ar- 
tillery, Ft, Meyers, Va, 

Hutchins, F, W., 2d Lieut. General 
Engineer Depot, U. S. Army, 1419 F. 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Sawyer, William F., 1st Class privts. 
3d Co. Officers training camp. 70th 
Division, Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass. 

Verbeck, Roland H.. 1st Lieut. U. 
8. I. Attached Officers, 153rd Depot 
Brigade, Camp Dix, N. J, 

1909. 

Call, Almon, E., Capt. 813th Engin- 
eers, Camp Dodge, Iowa. 

Neale, Harold J., 1st Lieut. Mass. 
State Guard, Co. 66. 

Noble, G. 11., Aviation, Texas. 

Noyes, John W., Corp. Co. I). 101st 
Regiment Engineers, A. E. F. France. 

Thomson, Jared B., 1st Class Private, 
Co. I. Camp Upton, Yaphank, L. I. 
1910. 

Brown, Lewis C, 1st Lieut. Engineers, 
U, S. R. Camp Lee, Petersburg, Va, 

French, Horace W.. 1st Lieut. 303rd 
Infantry, Camp Devens. Ayer, Mass. 

Mc.Viff, Owen A., ea-'lO, Signal Corp. 
University of Vt., Burlington, Vt. 

Stockwell, C. W., ex-'lO, Aviation 
Corp. Mineola, L. I. 

1911. 
Armstrong. Ralph H., ex -11, Corporal 
in 104th Inf., A. E. ¥., France. 

Howe. Harold H., Private Co. B. 26th 
Kng. A. E. F. via New York. 

I^rabee, Edward A., Training Camp, 
Yapbank, L. 1. 

Niekersou.George P., Major 166lh Field 
Artillery Brigade, 901 h Division Nal'I 
Army. Camp Travis, Texas. 

Parsons, Samuel R., Military research 
on problems connected with aeroplane 
engine*, Wational Bureau of Standard*. 
Washington, D. C, 

Pauh, Roland U„ District Board for 
Northern District W. Va., at Ctarks- 
burg, W. Va., for service, 

WlkkI, Alton P., 2nd Lieut. Infantry, 
O. R < 

1912, 

Been, Roland T., Lieut, Camp Der- 
en*, Ayer, Maw, 

Bent, William R.. 1st Lieut. Madison 
Barracks, N. Y. 

Bodnsh, Edward H., Engineer, Chil- 
lloothe, Ohio. 

< urran, Dante) T., Lieut, O, R, C. 

iKnlge, Albert W,, Ueni. Supply Ob, 
WWnd Infantry, Hamilton, Maw, 

Flsherdlek, Watreu F., Private Co. 4, 
lrtth Engineers E, K, A. E. P., France 
▼la. New Vork. 

Fowler, G, Seetl, aw't. chemist in 
Ordnance Dept. of Navy, Naval Ptot- 
lag Grounds. Indian Head, Md. 

U«Unat, Lottie E,. Lieut, F. A.B.C. 
818th F. A, Camp Jackson, Columbia, 

Gray, Frank L,, Army, N. M. C, A, 
fccr'y Fort R««dman, New Bedford, Mass. 

Hasay, Willard H., 1st Lieut, O. R. C. 
.1 1 Market Street, Campeilo, Mass. 

Heatley, DavM S„«17 Hanover Street, 
Fall River, Maw. 

Hills. Frank B., Lieut, Co, D. Train- 
ing Camp, Camp Stanley, Leon Springs, 
Texas, 

Hillpold. Dr. Warner 1st IJeul. Medi- 
cal Beserve Cwrps, 1 dark Sweat, East- 
Hampton, Mas*. 

Lamson, Robert, 1st IJent, Sanitary 
Corps, U.S. H, A., 81 Pleasant Street, 
Amherst, Mass. 

Lodge, Cbarles A., Com missioned, 
Mmwiit, Alberta, Canada. 

O Ftynn, cieorge, A viatkm Corps. 



College Candy Kitchen 

OPEN ALL THE TIME 



THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN MAKING 
HOME-MADE CANDIES 



Chocolates, Fudges, Caramels 

and a Large Line of 

Hard Candies 

ALSO SALTED NUTS 

At the Fountain are Hot Drinks, College 

Ices and a lot of other things 

to eat and drink 



OPPOSITE THE TOWN 




COLLEGE STORE 



North Dorm 



Special Sale— M.A.C. 



Station 



ss. 



Regular 40c grade 
at ..... . 



29c 



per 
bos 



SALE ENDS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 191S 



JBWBLBfia 

C. £. Mi llett Estate 



A f olUItt* of CMa*« iMrrin iiw*i» in Mock 
Broken L*mm reptaead while ran w»lt 

Lincoln Block, Amherst, Mass. 

£. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

William* BlOCk, Amhrr.i 

Hoori ttolta. s»„l-a0to&p, i 



A MIDNIGHT LURCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

Easy to care for and no danger of Are 

Alio a good line of 
STUDENT LAMPS AMI APPLIANCES 



& FAY, EJectricitt 



8ft Boxes if Choice Flowers 

will alwayi Hand an thr fineat 
itanof 



Gratitude; Congratulation,; 
Be*t WMMMi Love; 

Sympathy. 

Dept. of Floricu 1 1 u r e 



TO» "Nonotuck* 

Holyoke's Leading Hotel 



RATES, $1.50 PER MY ANI UP 

Banquet Hall— Smart Parties 
vt Specialty. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918. 



Pearson, Charles C, Co. C, 101st Ma- 
chine Gun Batt. A. E. F., France, care 
of New York 1'ostmaBter. 

Philhrick, William E., Battery No. 2, 
Reserve Officer's Training Camp, Fort 
duelling, Minnesota, 

Plerpont, John E., 7th Co. lB2n<l 
Depot Brigade, Camp Upton, Yaphank, 

L. I. 

Pratt, Marshall C„ l'rivau- <«>• A. 
101st Military Police, 26th Division A. 
E. F., France. 

Sanctuary, William, Signal Corps, 

Amherst, Mass. 

Shaw, Ezra, 1st Lieut. Engineers, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

Tupper. George W., 2d Lieut. Inf., R. 
C. 75 Artbertoii, Street, Jaiuai.a Plain, 

Mass. 

Wales, Robert W., Private, A. S. S. C, 
U. S. Army, 130 Wales Street. No. Ab- 
ington. Mass. 

Weaver, W. Jack, Inspector, Military 
Training Commission, State of New 
York. Highland, N. Y. 

Williams, Silas, 1st Lieut. Ordnance 
O. R. C. m tochrau Street, Chicopee 

Falls, Mats. 

1913. 
Brown, Herbert A.. 1st Lieut. Co. D. 
853rd Inf. Camp Funston, Kansas. 

Clark, Norman K., Capt. U. S. Army 
O. R. C. Millbury. Masa. 

Daniel, Edward S. C. lOlat U. 8. 
Eng. Boston, Mass. 

Dayton, James W., Aviation Section, 
Signal Officers Reserve Corpa, Park 
Field, Millington.Tenn. 

Dohaman, Seuekeriem M. ex-13. 
Aviation Corps, Aviation School. San 
Antonio, Texas. 

EUa, Gordon W„ Captain, Philippine 
CouHtabulary, L*. >' 8. Army, P. I. 

Forbusb, W. «'.. Third officers Train- 
ing Camp, < amp Upton, Yaphank. L. I. 
French, Jaraea D., M Uenl. Inf. B. 
( '., 12th Co.. 154th Depot Brigade, 
Camp Meade, Md. 

.MwdBottgh, U. E., aa-'li, A. 1. F„ 

France, 
trt.re, Harold M., 1st Ueut. Amherst, 



1914 



Beadle, Herbert W., Wrd Engineers, 
Camp Meads, Baltimore, Md. Imme- 
diate service In Franc*. 

Headle, Marshall, Afiation (*or|». A. 
E. F. Franca, now nylon. SpringlleWI. 



P. U. iEHAN 



Jorton,*. Miller, Urn Mochls. JMnola, 
Mexieo, naf»«*ta to gel in infantry or 
cavalry mmn. 

L»»co, Nils P.. 1st Lieut. M.C. IfWth 
l'. S. Inf., Camp WaAworta, Spartans- 

Burg, S. < 

Leswe. J.,hn W. T.. Third Offleen 
Training Cim P , Camp Upton, Yapbank, 

L.L 

Miller, H. H., Infantry. 

Meal, Ralph T., Third Officers Train- 
ing Camp, rpton, Yapbank, L.l. 

Nichols. Norman J„l«i Inf. to., Third 
Offi»ri Training Camp. Camp Upton, 
Yapbank. L. I. 

Hoalin, Herman T., 1st Lieut. Ord- 
nance.O. K. t\. IflB K. 17«thStr«t. n. « 

York City. 

Ruppel, Arthur U„ «**!»» 1»» ^»« Ht - 
mi Artillery, V, ft. Regular Army, Ft. 
Leavenworth, Kan. «..,«* 

Ryder, Harold W„ Serg't. Chief Me- 
chanic Co. F. Milt AmmoaUion Tram. 

Camp Gordon, G*. 
BtrMter.ch«rlesM.,HeadqBartew< ■ . 

llWiid Field Artill»ry,»th IHvi.ion 51rf 

Brigade, A. E. F. Franc* via New lork. 

Tapper, A >..Knalne«». A. K. »., 
France. K««sburj, M«». 

Turner. L. ltetmett. Drafted and wil- 
ed 4fl Dartmouth Street. Hclrnoni. Mas-. 

Whituei, Francis W..Li-..«. Otlrtfl 
Training Camp, Camp Lpt.'". Yaphank. . 
L. I. J 



Anderson, Leslie O. ex-14, Private, 
Medical Division St. Elizabeth's Hospi- 
tal, Washington, D. C. 

Bradley, J. W., Aviation Corps.Ground 
School, Princeton I'niv., Princeton, N.J. ] 

Brown, Harry D., 1st Lieut. Inf. U. 
C. A. E. F. France. 

Chapon, Robert H., ex-'14 Enlisted in 
French Army August, 1914, killed Jan- 
uary, 1916. 

Clark, Ernest S. Sergeant. 3rd Co. Offic- 
ers Training Camp. Camp Devens.Ayer. 

Demond, Hubert N. ex-14 Drafted and 
called for National Army (North 
Adams.) 

Earle, II. Weston. 1st Mass. Engineers 
Co. A serving on detached service at 
Pluttsburg, N. Y. 9th Co. N. N. E. 
Division, 

Kdgerton, Almon M., Camp Sheridan, 
Battalion C, 135th F. A., Montgomery, 

Ala. 

Ewards. Edward C, 2nd Lieut., ft. M. 
C. National Army, Barracks 342 ft. M 0. 
Camp Devens, Ayer. 
Kblri.lsic, Harold U (New York City.) 

Foster, Stuart ft., Scientilic Corps V. 
S. A., West field. 

Freeborn, Stanley B., 1st l.ieut. in 
Sanitary Corps, Medical Dept., U. S. 
Army, Berkley, Cal. 

Fuller, George, Naval Reserve, Deer- 

neld. 
Heffron, Frederick, Co I, 302nd Inf., 

Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Hutchinson. John (i., Naval Reserve, 
Arlington. 

Luces, H.D.. Sergeant, Gas liefense Ser- 
vice ol Sanitary Corps, Medical Corp*. 
Astoria, L. 1. 

Melloon, Ralph R-, ea.*14, Ueut I 

*s R 

Morse, Handd .L, Ensign, Assistant 
Paymaster. I*. S. N. ft. F. Pay Officer's 
School, Catholic Cnivenuty, Wasblag- 

D. C. 

Manroe, Donald W., Lieut., Head- 
quarters Supply Co., 20th Regt, Mass, 
state Guard, Springfield, 

s eolet. Tall W„ Aas't. Engineer, 
Div. i}. M < . Cantonment Div., Wash- 
ington. D I 

Palmer, John Philip, ex-*I4, OTdnance 
fcrg«ant, Ordnance Depot, Oaaip ftBeri- 
dan, Ohio. 

Presley, Fred Y., ex '14, Base H«pl- 
tal No.fl, A. ft, F„ Frmne*. 

ICmebrooks.Walter B.,TralnlngCa«p, 

Yapbank. L. 1 
Thayer, G. M. 
Tower. A. Leigh, A. K. F.. Fran«, 

(Mi»'th>t<l 
Tupper, Arthurs. Sergeant. 15th l*. 

s. Engineers A. E. F., Fraace via New 

York. 

Whippen, C W„ CorporaJ, ^Nd F. 
A., Battery C, Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Wheeler, Chester E,,lnd Inf., Reserve 
Corps, Both Aero Sqnadrun, Avian..*. 
Concentration Camp, Gardner City, 

V. Y 
W.mmI. Henry J„ TrmlBing Camp, 

Yaphsnk.L. 1. 

191 & 

Bartletl. Edward R.. Co. I, Ml«t, 
Camp Sherman, ( hiilicthe. Ohio. 

[tixhop. C he s ter A., Srd »)fficerii 
Traininii camp. Camp Upton, Yap- 
bank, L. L 

Bragg, R«lpn **•. Krd EngiBeew* 
Begt., U. ». A.. Milfonl). 

Biittrlrk. J. f., T, ft, N.. Wakefleld, 
(Mfir^rn). 

i ari.le, Ik.nald II.. Battery D, IWd 
F. A.. I'iCi.iof! 26, A. K. F., France. 

Chase, \le\ainler H.. Jr , Tr»< U Ve, 
5. Supply Train. TOh Division, Camp 

D^vees, a*»*f, 

Clevelaad, Waldo A., Cadet Pllot.S. 
M. A., Austin, Texas. 

[Conllntisd on paf t SI 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



i 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Scbillarc's Stu&io t£i 

142 rlSam St., 

flortbampton, flDass. 





CUTLER 



•DEALF.RR IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



REMEMBER 



. YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND 



The Best in Materials and Manufacture 



NO MATTER WHAT YOU NICEU 



IN THE LINE OF CLOTHES 



At the 



it Prices 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918. 



! 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



1'uhlisln'il every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD ()F EDITORS. 

MA.lt8HAI.LO. I.ANPHKAUMs.KMtor-in-Chlef 



Abhwiatk KlMTOHS. 
AltTHI'R N. BOWKN 'la 

Ei.itcr m. Burron m» 

ARTiirit i,. ( ham>m;k Mil 

MVKTON F. IMSS 19 

BUSINESS DKI'A UTMENT. 

HAMITKt, B. KKKKISS Mh. Kuslness Manager 
ft, M. ( A MI'KKI.I.JO. AaaUUnt Manager 

■IAMK8 ('. MAIM.I-.s '20, Advertising Manager 

G. ai.kk::i» smith •ao. t'trcuhwtea 

Subscription $2,<X1 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered aa aeeondtlaaa 
Post Office. 



the A inherit 



Vol. XXVIII. Tuesday, Feb. 12. No. 16 

Subscription, payable to the Massa- 
chusetts Collegian. $2.00. Charges in 
addresses should be sent to the cir- 
culation department of the Collegian 
if they are desired. 



It is with pleasure that the OOL- 
I. Kfti AM publishes a complete list of 
Aggie men in military service. These 
facts speak for themselves in showing 
that M. A. C. is doing her little bit well. 
A close scrutiny of the list also proves 
th:«t I be part our men play is an import, 
ant one. The percent of commissioned 
and Bon-commissioned olricers runs very 
high and Is rapidly increasing. It 
•hows that Aggie men are leaders. It 
is a reeord to be proud of. 

Such a list of addresses as this natu- 
rally contains many errors. It is just a 
starter collected here and there from re- 
ports received from the men or (heir 
friends. In Mine eases the names of 
men are down who have enlisted but are 
not yet called. Some have sent in nn 
reports and we know nothing of their 
whereabuQia, But it i« a fair beginning 
even so. It is our plan to puhlUh the 
corrected addresses juat as fast as Ihej 
are seo i in, This issue of ibeCoi.i «.i \s 
will be seat to every Aggie man In mili- 
tary service. Any errors in addr esses 
should be r eported to mi at unea. The 
ram pus War Barf-iee (Joamfttee has 
been endeavoring all ibi- year to get an 
acenraie and complete lint of M. A, C, 
enlisted men This hi posted as a sort 
of honor roll in the Social I*tilon rooms. 
To make this a credit tuthe college, en- 
operation Is needed on the part of every 
graduate or undergraduate, 

Mas in fervhse— when yon change 
your address or hear of someone b!m 
wbii baji.drojm postal H» the ('ui.i.m.ia.v 
office, notifying u« «»f the fact. t»r bat. 
ter siill, send a letter telling of your 
Wherealmuts. If each one of yon do 
this we ran awmre you ot a complete 
and up to date list of all yomi friends in 
camp. And incidentally your own cor- 
r#iir«»ndence will increaae as a raatili , 

Through the mediitm Hi this list as 
published today it tfeotild to* pumibla to 
start a corre»iM»ri<bu. .• campaign among 
Aggie Hen, Prnbablj no one MM read 
over (hex* column* Without finding the 
name* of several id bis «lo*e«t frieads, 
A friendly word el rbeet frttffl vmi may 

tl«t OiHcli to keep f beir BplrilS Up dttfing 

tiiesi' trying times, Each one of us 
ought to resolve to write to at least lour 



or five of these boys each week, select- 
ins; a different group every time. And 
further, when several men get together 
for a"bull fest, "after fraternity meeting 
Monday nights for those on the campus, 
why would it not be a wise stunt to get 
out a pad and drop a round robin letter 
to a few of the classmates in the 
trenches. It would take only a few 
moments, yet might afford hours of 
pleasant memories to the boys in ser- 
vice. True, the college is in a way 
broken up, t he men scattered here and 
there all over (he face of the globe, 
Hut if we all do our part in this cor- 
respondence campaign, the old Aggie 
Bpirit can still be kept alive in the 
hearts of the men — even those at the 
ends of the world And they will be 
the better for it. 



AGGIE LOSES TO DARTMOUTH 
IN FAST HOCKEY MATCH 

The M. A. (*. hockey team met its sec- 
ond defeat of the season Saturday after- 
noon at the hands of the siroag Dart- 
mouth seven in a score of 8-0. The 
game was slow ami poorly played by 
both teams. Dartmouth's defense 
allowed the Aggie players lew shots at 
the goal ami these w»re easily blocked 
by Gale. Karly in the game Murphy 
of the Ureas scored from a scrim- 
mage and later caged a long shot 
from the side of the rink. Dartmouth's 
rover also scored the third goal of the 
game at the beginning of the second 
period when he surprised the Aggie de- 
fense and obtained a clear shot at the 
net. The remainder of the game was 
scoreless nod much nmre exciting. 
Murphy whs easily the star of the game 
and repeatedly carried the puck the 
length of the rink, r'nxoii did good 
work for Aggie by making several 
ditlicult stops, which aiiled considerably 
in keeping the score low. 
The summary: 



DAKTMolTII. 

«ale, g 
Boss. J., cp 
I turn I. p 
Bom. F., rw 
Davis, Iw 

Bothsehild.c 
Murphy, ro 



M, A. l. 

g, Faxon 

c p. crafts 

p. Smith 

rw. McCarthy 

Iw, Uavitl 

c, Bedding 

ro, Chisholm 



Beferea— Needham oi M.A.C, Timer 
—Dickinson of MA, c. Time -10 mla- 

Ute halves 



INFORMAL SATURDAY 

(in account of the weather conditions 
which made car service uncertain, no 
Informal was held last Saturday as plan. 
tied. The dance will be held this week. 
Thus* men who invited girlsfor the last 
Informal and who Intend taking la the 
affair Saturday must pass in i heir names 
and receive the name of the new 
chaperone, Tickets whleb were sold 
for last week are good for the neat 
dance. The limit is again »el at fifty 
con jiies. a few ticket* remain which 
must be purchased by Wednesday night 
at ten o'clock. Men who do not care to 
go to an Informal on .Saturday and so 
desire, may return their tickets and 
receive the price paid for them. 



WFBSTER'S STUDIO 



Everything in 
Photography 



OROIIFM 

Nash Block 



HPBCIALTY Rood work speaks for itse'f. 

Amherst, Mass. 



P. W. DAVOL 

Instruction on Mandolin 

5 Fairview Ave. Tel. 285-M 

S. S. HYDE 

Jeweler imkI Optlolfin 

in I'leusunt St 1 1 it 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Kroken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repair- 
ing I'mnipi Ij and Skilfully Done. 
Hatisfactlmi tiuaranteed. 



I. Parhitt F. I,. PABriTT 

CROYSDALE INN 

SOUTH IlAlit.EY, MAH8. 

Luncheons, Afternoon Teas, Dinners 

ooon I HI Nil* TO 1*1. 
Tel.262H W 

LABROVITZ 

Cleaning and Pressing 

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE 

Gents' Furnishings Ticket — v - 1 . ,. . 

II AMITV STREET 




The PERFECT 

Pipe Tobacco 



°*. P ^ M ' ** mi,d ' fragrant slow lHii-nintr, 
and DOES NOT BITE THE TONGUE 

THAT'S WHY ITS PERFECT 



tan 

+■«*. * an 

IMtX. 4 an 

16-ob. i an 



25 « ents 
50 Cents 
90 1 snu 
$1.80 



h la ABSOLUTELY THE 
FINEST MIXTURE 
PRODUCED 



Manufactured bjr 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., Boston, U.S.A. 




mi ELECT! OFffGERS 

At the ei,MM« or chape) HfMay tfea 

clawi uf liftJl hclil an eleeliiin iff nfrini-. 
Julius Kroeck of liruuklyn wanelc.te.j 
class captain; K, A, Mellsn uf t am- 
Iiritisre. hiMt.irlan; J. [I. Hrk'ham of 
Sutton, »erBcaitl-«t*ariwii arid E. <*. 
r,„,tn i,b of |»e a i„Ml v , rifla team taanaffer. 
The olaaa voted to semi a committee 
(«» the president to present the re« 
quest that the hmmr syttent be estah* 
llshed it M. A, V, 



How to make 1 Bank Book 
look fat! 

"Sate by spending wisely". 

In clothei, the wisest economy 
U buying a good tort moderately 
priced. 

Quality that ataurca a full dol- 
lar's worth for every Hollar spent. 

•'Your money back'* hacks 
ours! 

Mslt. i.lll.KKS K1I I «H 

Roorhs P»»t Company 



st tath at. 

Hinsdway 

»t V?srr«n 



Cwtwfi" 

mew iimn cm 



nrosdwM 
aiMth St. 

rtrot avs 

at tltt st 



Tbe New 

DE LAVAL 

W11.1 Otrs Tot 

Better Service 
Longer Wear 

r <M)K wall to HKBVICK when you 
** buy a creain separator. It means 
Mora than anythinir else. It should 
include not only a good working and 
fallible machine, bm the right sort 
of attention mad interest on the part 
of the nailer, both at the time the 
machine is set up and as long as you 
continue to mm It, Ba iawal service 
Is well knows. You can dapend on It. 

You get more falua lor your int. nt-y 
wban you buy % Ot Laval, bManae— 
m the experience of IhouaaBda and 
tliousands of user* has provc-d— a De 
lAval will outwear aay otfcar wake; 
and it will give ye* better service 
than any oth«r separator. 



THE K UVAi SEPARATOR 



tSft Illto % f»W * V 



W B. M AniaoM ar. 
f'H W At JO 



Northampton Players 

"CHARLEY'S AUNT" 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

[Continued from psife 1-1 



14)0 to 3-15 l'. M. 
Floriculture 51, f, 11. C 
Pomology 51, V. H. K 
Chemistry til , Obem. i.ait. 

Kutomology 81, K. 15. K 

Sophomore Chemistry *2H, Cbem. Lab. 

Algebra, Prof. Duncan, ('. II. A 
l*rof. Osiiatuler, f, L. M 
3-25 to 5-40 f. at. 
Katin .Manauciuent 75, F. L. M 

Landscape 51, f. ll. K 
Botany Bt, C, 11. A 
Cbemlatry 77, Obem. Lab. 
Zoology 51, K. it. K 

Agricultural Economics 20, Drill Hall 
Fhitiay, Fiis. 22. 

7-30 toiMfi A. v. 
Animal llusl»andry 70, F. L. M 
Mat hematics 77, s. 11. m> 

English 55, S. H. Ill 
English 70, S. H. Ill 

Sermaa »i, f. 11. <; 
Kpaniab 51, F. II. E 

Agricultural Economics 52. 0. II. II 
Enloniolouy 20, E. H. I) 
Fresliman Plant Lite. Drill Hall 

0-55 to 1-2-1U 
Dairying 75, F. I.. K 
Entomulogy W, E. li. D 
Agricultural Education 77, S. II. 110 
Ft.ultry 52, ». II, 111 
Botany 96, C. U. A 
Freshman Agriculture Drill Hall 

Any examination not sclieiluletl aOove 
must be arranged (oi liy individual 
appointment with the instructor in 
charge of the nulijeei. 

In the event <>i una voidable conflict 
for students having repeat courses, the 
examination scheduled for the tower 
must take pit lence. 



Do You 

Want 

Help? 




This Week 



Send for our practical Corn 
Book. It will help you grow 
more to the acre. 

Order your supplies of 

E. Frank Coe's 

l Kaa. t? a. M. *ht ' 

Fertilizers 

now for immediate shipment. 
For over awrty year§ they have 
helped good fcrmers increase 
their corn profits, A§k for 
prlcet. 
We want more agents. 



tftIM 



The Coe-Mortaw Comptny, 

fjaMdiary of tb» AuniliSii Milt amid 
fleoitmt I'e. 

SI Charabert Street, New YorK City 



AGGIE MEN IN SERVICE 

K'onttnued from pa«s 8l 

Flebut, Alpha .l.,3rd Olricers" Train- 
ing ("amp, ("amp I'ptoti, Yaphauk, Ij. I. 

(iriirtts, Baym I 1?.. Eicnt,, 101*1 

Begt, Inf.. Co. M, A. E. F., Erance. 

Hall, George U„ <are of Burgeon 

Oeneral, l'.ase Hospital N*o. 1, A. E. F., 
Frame. 

Hall, lioderi.k D., l'ri\ate, Medi<al 
Depl , Baae Hospital, Camp Merrill, N •' • 

llatlield, William II., 3rd Olliceis' 

Training Camp, Camp Upton, Yap- 
hank l,. l. 

Hyde, Oeorge F., Captain. Inf. I*. 8. 
It., 37th Inf.. Fori Mclniosh, Laredo, 
Texas. 

Lewis, .1. K.. (New Haven. CottB.) 

Lovcjoy, John H., Private, (^, SI. C, 
CaaualCo., list DiVsioii, Camp Merritt, 
N. .1 

MucNeil. It. L., Hehool of Military 
Aeionauties, a.s. s. K. K. C, Cornell, 

Ithaca. N. Y. 

Mann, Buger II.. Medical DepL- «'«'• 
F, Fort Ethan Allen. \'t. 

McKeciinie, U. F.. L. S. Naval Hadlo 
Bcbool, Camluidge. 

M.Lain. Italph B., Captain. V. 8. »., 
A. E. F.. Fiance. 

Moniagtic. turn .L, 1st Lieut., Inf., 
I v |{.. Kelley Fiehl, Noiith San An- 
tonio, Texas. 

Parker, Edwin K., U»lst Estglneera, 
A. E. f„ Franca. 

Pstterstm, K. F., Aviation liround 
Sehool lOU Hurt M . D-irehester). 

Porter. Hennetl Allen, Lieut., IS. 

A. army. 

Sears. William It., 3rd O fficer s* Train- 
ing Camp, Camp I'ptoti, Yaphank, L. 1. 
Severn nee, Verne L., l*t Claws Private, 
Q. M. C, Remount 8iaib»n,Camp D.* 
hi*, Ayer, 

Simon, I»8ac H., 1st Lieut., Inf., V . 8. 
H., (20 A svauniback st., SexbatyK 

smith. Hydf, ItergasBL o. M, c,. 
Camp ^v«BB, Ayer. 

Tsrr, Lester W., 1st Lieut., Ordnance 
Corps, France, ( Bock port ). 

lower, Reginald, 1st Lieut,, C. S. It 
A. E. F., Franca. 
Vener, Beryiman, XaUooai Arwy. 
Wharf, Paul. 

William*, A. 1., Aviation flrottnd 
Sebool. M. I. T„ Cambridge. 

William*. IMnald, Bargeant-Msjor. 

31W1I1 Heavy Artillery, Camp Din, N .1. 

Zehrung, hsmuel H., Engineering 

Dept. (amp Devena, Ayer. (lomeville, 

Ohio.) 

1016. 
Balnster. Scth W„ Privsle, a4tb I ... 
8lh Bat., Itepot Brigade, Camp Denias, 
Ayer. 

Batnta.II.W.. Aviation Corps, Ground 
•school Cornell CniverKlfy, Ithaca, K. T. 
Barnes, Fred, Naval liewrve. Haw- 
|m»M, It. I iPlytnonth.) 

Illatipied. Nelson W.. Irtlh F. A, Bel- 
le ry C. Camp tircene, Charlotte, W. C. 

Carderelli, E, J . t& Lieut, o, It. C. 

Co. M, 3t«nd Inf. Cswp Devena, Ayer. 

Clapp, B, U, Norihlield. 

Coleman, Albert s .. Sergeant. Awbu- 

\ mwm% t„ N, Camp fireenlesf, F»n 

tlulellii.rpc. I.;i 

( oiirchene. A hide T., Co, A., 604th 
Engineers, North Adams. 

Gushing, Kayniond A , e*.*lfl, la 
trainlnK t»f Artillery CommiMtnn a* 
Fort I*avenw«nb, Kaa, 

Danforili. (iectrge K„ Third Officer's 
Training Camp, Camp t'pton. Yaphank, 

L, I. 

Dpdge, WiHet K.. (,enevs,Obi«. 
Eldridac. Haym»tid C., Co. M, KWnd 

jnf Camp Deven«. \yer. 

Fielding. LeeiM i .a:ird«.»„«tthltac. 
ifil*i Depot Brtfade, Camp Devins, 
Ayer, 



THE AIM 



After twenty-fi¥« years clot* business association with the best dtcssttl 

men in your college i 

To keep our lines of young men's togs so utterly smait and distinctive, 

And Priced for All Purses 

that it will be a pkasuie to l>uv luie, knowing that we're spet ialists of twenty- 
five years' expetience. 

Highland Heather, an unusually »mart "trench" overcoat, waterproof, 

$25.00, Less 10 Per Cent 

Headquarters for the 

Gordon, Ferguson Sheep-lined Ulsters, Short Coats, best coat made, 

Priced from $15.00, Less 10 Per Cent 
Our famous Reversible Collar Shirts, priced from $1.50 $6.00 

At the Young Men's Specialty Shop 

CamptOn'f Block, - ■ - Amherst 

SEE CAMPION FIRST 



" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Wafflea 

Oyf .H*eialtv-And citli^i gcrt thing* to tat. 

MKS. L. M. STliBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley. Maaa. 

Tel. 411 w 

The Highland Hotel 

I ,,rnet nf IIUIiiiiMt tttifj UMftie* Htreeln. It.s.e 
liWx'kN from On- I l»l«.ii |H|«»t. In ■ nuMlrm l«» 
leln nnn.e il»- KiiK!. in l'l;iu It l<* jn»i » »tep 

f r ,,, M \| Hirer!. i«:i> frmii the imlne nntl .liml . 

■ nil yet In the . BtttWI el Mm- bOSllMM *Wrk I. 
II. ro.tni»8rr*elt ftlttiUht , foilal.te. 

ii.niriii.t trlftiliotie »ml li»t ■no • "'•' ronnlM* 
«:iier In *ve»y rimn. rrl'e»al un.i up: itHtiim 
wt it li bath UiliilkTi ll.Se win! HI' 

It* e^.eltenl eiilnlne mid well \enMl;ile<l .tin 
Inn M.1.111 make* « nn>»l i i-i. m«ih '«> m,.«h 

evfrrytMnCtof the liiiiln -1 * ' '' 

»ml M-tM-il In ttie \» -i i«.«mli i 

Htnj Mt the IIIeIiI«ii.1 Hotel ,,im e .....I |M Witt 
iMitlrinat* utMrlntt liien- Uftlfl Miml« «' I ' «J 
evvntutf. 

D. H. Sie\rers, 

MUkU«nd H*««l. Sprtnin*ld. Nan. 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main Strett. MaSOON Building, 
S'nrthamptnn, Ma*s 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

(7,tt,,/ r-tih pom t A M. *• 4 4 U 

The Holyoke Vain I Hydrant Co. 

.t»ht*r« «f Wn.n*hl tr«n «<! I III >>■« III* 
V»lv«i und UtiiTns- f«t *'< »i- v* it. -i inn 
i,M 4.l««*i..» nti't M'. ' T* 

l-nvvtlni*. I1t"'''' 11 »■ " l "' •■ >,|U -"il't'tle* 
Knilniw* mnA e rmfi '•>' »«"J 

||. ,t Wain HMtflnB, V nf- hi. m> h|irlnk»r 
pf,iij.iii(i, iwtlivr mnA RaglM « i.iinrctttiaa. 

Hoiy*k#, Mass, 

PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Qiiiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY Dll 

Knro|H»»u I'luft 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING AND 
SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Ni-%1 t<i Cawplua'ti 

JOHN FOTOS, PROP. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Booka i <umi«in pea» 

A|t«nta for Re* Typewriter 

P. M.CURRAN C. F. DVEK 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

- K. I». M M: - M I - I \ I I — 

W»T«Blii»apn l«M 
StKIMIKN IjANK Fc>J.«JKK. Ibc. 

iae BRoaowAY. nhw yohk 
i I.I II AMI c-<> Lionel it 

l»IN'H A?*l» KINliN of 
(tout ntt.vNti *«rf> MHiii»r «»iui* 

DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

<»-t«-<>|Mltll 



7* Main Hi, 

IIS* |»t« >■ I. 



Johnson Book Go. 



A u:r i < ;u 1 tural Books 
-:- Filing Cases -- 



BABBITT '18, Manager 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 

Writing Paper 

With Mm Nmerili and College Sits 

All k tori- Of 

leaf Booki and FoonUin 
Nat, Banner* and 
Pennants 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Ncwedeelcr and Stationer 



i 



'/ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918. 



» 



THE DINING HALL 

is offering most attractive board 
to the student body. 

The get-together, songs and 
college life, and good times cen- 
ter about the dining hall. 

The calTeteria offers a-la-carte 
servire. 

The main dining room serves 
monthly board. 



Drop in at 

"YE AGGIE INN" 

Board by week or al-a-carte 
$5.50 



Candy, Tobacco 
Student Supplies 

Run for Aggie Men 

By Aggie Men 



H. E. SPAULOING 19, Manager 



HECK MAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



** HAMP »• 



COTTAGE CHEESE 

is richer in protein than most meals 
and is very nineh cheaper. 

Try a package and be convinced. 

Also try our fancy cheese: 



Neufchatel 
Olive 



Pimento 
Club 



All products made from pasteur- 

i/ed milk and cream. 



Dairy Department 

Mass, Agricultural College. 

Dr. L. O. Whitman 

9 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hour*: 1-3, 1-H p. m. Sunday ami 
other hours by appointment. 



Th«r« areSef-u i »id K<M*o*whay yo» should 
baf your 



COAL 



or 



C. RELDEK 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

19 Pleasant Street 

Walk down town Mtf rmM an a |t|*utr . 
Hi-m- In where j mi Hud r h>- i>|f» mot h«*r make*. 

Oood Service and Reasonable Prices 



School and College photographers . , . 



LOCALLY: 5* 





Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS AND POULTRY DRESSERS 

WIInl.KHAI.K MM 



, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Park, Hams, Bacon, 
Poultry, Dame, Butter, C heese , 



BlaekitlotHi, North sad North Outre street,, 
BOSTON, .... riASl, 



Russell, Burdsall & Ward Bolt and Nut Co. 

PORT CHESTER, NEW YORK 



EMPIRE b V v \s ni 




C&rp^n-ter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook 



Amherst, Mm. 



Fernald, Charles H., 2nd, U. N. It. F. 
Hospital Corps, Base Hospital, Newport, 
K. I. 

Uilmore, Benjamin A., Third Officer's 
Training (amp, Srd Co., 70th Division 
Camp Derails, Ayer. 

1 1 al 1 . St an ley W. , Third Officer's Train- 
ing Camp, Camp Upton, Yaphank, L. I. 

Mai links. Thomas 1.., Chief chemist, 
Inspeetion See, 1.8. Army, Aetna Ex- 
plosives Co., Emporium, Pa. 

Harris, William L., Jr., Drafted, Deer- 
tleld. 

Haskell, Frank K., 1st Lieut., U. 8, 
A. C. 15.. 13th M. C. Bat. 5th Div.. Fort 
8am Houston, Tex, 

Hathaway, Charles E., Jr., 1st Lieut., 
Co. li, jr.th Inf., Camp Zachary Taylor, 
Ky. 

Hemenway, Justin 8., 1st Lieui,, U. 
8. A., 3"th Inf., Lareko.Tex. 

Hendry, Arthur E., 1st Class Private, 
Co. C.,3(»7th Engineers, Camp Cordon, 
Atlanta (.a. 

Huntington, Charles A., Jr., 1st Lieut, 
of inf. (.8. R, Attached otheer, 153rd 
Depot Brigade, Camp Diss, X. J. 

Kill.on. Ralph Q , Co. B, 10th Uegt, 
Kiigiueers, H. B., C. E.F.France, care 
..t Ad jt. (Jen., Washington, D. C. 

Little. Harold <;., Naval Reserve, 
Chelsea. 

Nash, Clayton \\\, Lieut. U. 8. A., 
Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

Palmer, George B., Third Officer** 
Training Camp, Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Pin Med, Philip A., Naval Reserve, 
105 Pleasant St., Arlington. 

Potter. Davtd,2d Lieut. ,308 Mach.Cun 
Bat., Camp livens, Ayer. 

Prouty, Stanley M„ 2d Lieut.. Head- 
t|iiarteis Constabulary, Manila, I*. I. 

Uiebards*, Everett 8., P. 8. A. Con- 
•tabular Service. Philippine Inlands. 

Rogers, Poland W., nu,t Kngineers. 

Rogers, Tyler 8.. (Praminghnm), 

Howe, LoiiU V., Aviation Corps, 
(Melrose.) 

Henderson, Kvet eft 8., A. K. K., France, 
(Cenlervllle R. L) 

Seheufele, Frank J., V, 8. Navy. 8. P. 
fW<7, Provineetown. 

Sehlotierbeek, (.ewla E., (Roxbttry 
Station, Conn.) 

Slimme, Peres, Co. E, 4th Bai.aOth 
Engineer). Am. Pnlveftlty, Washing- 
Ion, D. c. 

Stoughlon. Ilichard, ex To. 14th Co., 
4th Ball,, Dc|mi[ Brigade, Camp Devenpi, 
Ayer. 

Ttipham. Mired, Camp Devetis, Ayer, 

Vcrlwik. Howard <»,, Aviation Section 
Signal Enlisted Reserve Corp*. Balloon 
Division, Furt Omaha, Net). 

Walkden. Herbert R„ Caselon Co. S, 
Ammunition Train, Camp Devenn, Ayer. 

Walker, Henry M., Sergeant , I7tb « ■• . 
Depot Brigade. Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Anderson, Frank A., Corporal, Co, B, 
Mai Light Artillery, Camp Devens. 
Ayer. 

1B17. 

Adams, Henry L„ ei-T7, Camp 
Deveos, Ayer. 

Alcitt, William J., Jr.. e*-*17, Co. E., 
14th Real . li. It. Engineers, A. E.F.care 
of Adjutant Henerat, Washington, D. C. 

Andrew*, Bolwrt M,, es-'M, U, «, B, 
Covington Navy Yard. Boston, Fireman 
I S, Navy. 

Babrork, Philip B., Aviation Sec, 

Signal Cairns, V. 8. A. K»p, Foree, 

France, via New York. 

Bell, Alfred W.. Jr., Troop L, Iflth 
Cavalry, San Benito, Tea, 

Boles, Hubert M., Ensign V, ft. N,, 
Annapolis, Mil. 

Phi,.. . Haloid P.. Heamaii* 2nd clan, 
8M Newbury St«, Boston, 

Hiiurirk. David IL. Q. M, C„ Fort 
Sloeum, N. Y. 

I hoate, Carlisle E., Headquarters 
Troop, 28 Div, U, 8. A. 



dough, Charles II., Training Camp, 
Yaphank, L. I. 

Cross, Walter L, Private 16th Co. 4th 

Bat., 141st Depot Brigade, Camp Devens, 

Ayer, 

Curtin, Charles W., Drafted not called. 
Newton. 

Davis, Monsell H., Orange, N. J. 
Dawson, Harry C, ex-'l7, drafted and 
accepted. 

Day, James IL, 2ml Lieut. U. 8. R., A. 
E. F. 

DeMolt, Harold E., ex-'17, Sergt., Co. 
F., 116th Iuf., U. 8. A. Camp Wada- 
worth.S. C. 

Dillon, T. S., Bakery, Co. 335, Fort 
Hamilton, N. Y. 

Dinsmore, Donald 8., 2nd Lieut., 103rd 
Field Artillery, A. E. F. France. 

Dudley, L. L., ex-T7, Lieut.. 21g 
Broadway, Long Branch, N. Y. 

Edwards. Frank O., Capt., 301st Head- 
quarters Police, Camp Devens, Ayer, 

Elliott, Ralph W., Co. 6, 302nd Inf.. 
Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Everheek. Ceorge (',, 2nd Lieut.. Inf. 
See. B. 31st Co. 8th Bat. Depot Brigade 
Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Farwell, Alfred A., ex-T7, 2nd Lieut. 
Field Artillery P. 8. R. 

Fearing, Ralph W., Training Camp, 
Yaphank, L. I. 

Fisher, George U., Sergt. 25th Co, 7th 
Bat., Depot Brigade, Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Graham, Leland J., N. 8. School of 
Aeronautics, M. I. T. Squadron 21, Cam- 
bridge, 

Grayson, Emory E. 

Groff, Howard C, ex-'17, Veternlary 
Corps, I S. A., Phiadelphia, Pa. 

Gurshin, Carl A.. I 8. N. K. F., Hos- 
pital Apprentice, 1st class, Newport, 
B. I. 

Uaaren, Paul J., ex-T7, Naval Avia- 
tion Student, Officer Naval Aviation De- 
tachment, M, 1. I ., Cambridge. 

Haaelstein, Charles U.,2d Lieut c 
V. c„ Ut Training Co . C. At. Train- 
ing Camp, Fort Mtiuroe, Vs. 

llains. Warren T„ Drafte.l, (Millbury), 

Hartford, Claude E., (Townsend), 

Hanek, Roland M„ (151 Capital Ave., 
Hartford, Conn.) 

I lett nlnger, Hone wel I W,, Balloon Corps, 
Fort Omaha, Nebr. 

Hetiderson, Elliott, ex-'17, earn of Mor- 
gan Uarjes Co., 81 Boulevard Hauasman, 
Paris, France. 

Hlgginlmtham, Uarry, ('snip Devens, 
Ayer, (»4 Washington m .. Taunton), 

Holt, Francis 8„ ex-'17, Seaman, P. 
S. M. F., U. S. S. Aeilre Patrol of N. E. 
Coast, 

Hyde, ftUnlsy, Medical Corps, A, 1, 
F., France. 

Irving, William K., 2.1 Lltnl..S04th 
Inf.. Camp Devens, Aytr. 

Lsneey, Clifford 8,, ei.*17, Ih-ieals, 
Medical Enlisted Service Reserve Corps, 
(Send mail to TownMnd.) 

Lamen, Frederic C, onl nance C«rps, 
Dartmouth (kjilege, Hanover, N. IL 

Latham, Paul W,, Training Camp, 
Yaphank, L. 1. 

I^awrence, Mllford R., Radio Station, 
Toysido Station, Newport, R, I. 

Light. Brooks, Naval Reserve, Bump- 
kin Island. 

Lydlard, Harry C, Balloon Pilot, (1« 
Barker St.. Hartford, Conn.) 

Mack, Walter A„ Captain, Bird Inf., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Mather, Fred, Pt. WI.7M, Canadian 
Forces, BostBgsloke, 

MHimre, R, T„ ex.*17, Naval Reserre, 
Newport, R, L 

McNamara, Micbast J., Training 
Camp, Yaphank, L. L 

Nash, Herman B., Officers* Training 
Camp, Yaphank, L. I 

Na«on, I^eonard H., ex. 1 17, Se rg e an t, 
Troop A, l*ib U. S. Cavalry, Fort 
Ethan Allen, Yt, 



THE WISE ONES 

read our advertise- 
ments. It pays. 
Every young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or he's a 
'•dead one." 

Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO., %££$£? 




THE 



United States Hotel 

Beacb. Lincoln and Kingston 8t» . 
BOSTON, nASS. 



Onlr two blocks from South Terminal Sta- 
tion, and euBilj reached from North ItBttoa 
br Elevated Railway, and convenient alike 
to the great retail ahona and buainew centre. 
also to the theatiea and places of interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table and aervice unaurpaased. 
Booklet and map sent upon application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



COLONIAL INN 

Southern Cooking Popu- 
lar ! Well, I should 
say so ! ! 

PLEASANT ST. 

Just before you enter the campus 



PLAZA 

on. M 

Where the Beat 

Photo-Play 

Features ... 

A,r» shown. 

CHASIOffO 



HENRY ADAMS & CO 

The 



Sodas 



Candy 



Kath, Motifs, ex-'17, Corporal, 801sl 
Inf., Camp Devon*. Ayer. 

Nelson, John H. 

Vims, Homer \\\. Aviation Section, 
r. s. a., (Montague, Mass.) 

N'oyes, Samuel V., <'. A. ('., Fort 
Wethsrall, R. i. 

Pierce, llarol.l U,.*2inl Lieut.. tT.S, A., 
Co. (i, 47th Inf., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Porter, Waylaml U., Corporal, Utli 
Co., 4ih Hat. Depot llrii,'rtil«, Camp 
Devens, Ayer. 

Priest, Softer, ex-'H, 317th Signal 
Hat., Camp Devens, Ayci. 

Uamlall, Earle M . l\ S. N. K. P., 0©, 
K, Marine ( SorpS, 

Hhoailes, Paul \\'., HJlst He«iment V . 

s. Kngtaeexa, S8th Division. 

Kieharuson, P. K., Co, P, 80W Inf., 
CaQBp Devens, A> t-r, 

rU)daer, Raymond M.. The American 
Aurieultural Chemical ('<>., Munt«om- 
ery, Ala. 

Rofers, Roland W., Engineer, l*. B, A., 

Co, K. Utlst Ihuiiiicnt, 1st Corps Cadets 
Aimory , Huston. 

Rorstrom, Hans A.. Training Camp, 
Yaphank, L. I. 

ROSS, Lout* X.,2il Lieut., Inf. I | 
l{., A. K. P., H. C. M., Paris, Frame. 

Kyan, William E., Jr., ex-17, Co. K, 
NM Regiment, Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Stater, John M.,Camp Devens, Ayer., 
(Turners Kails). 

Saville. Williiim, Jr., Ut Lieut., I >. 
P., atMth Inf., 7«Hh Division, Camp 
Devon*. Ayer. 

Schur, Arthur L., ex-*l7, ordnance 
Serneant, Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. 

Shumway, Paul K , ex- 17, Siudcnt 
Naval Aviator, V . S. N. Air station, 
Bldg. 54ft, Pensacola, Fla. 

smith, Uayden IL, ex-17, P. B B 
Denver, care of Pimtuiastei Hes Vork 
Clly, Ensign, P. S. Navy. 

Smith, Herbert D.. P. S. A. 

Spauldinjj, Alinon W., Section H5, P. 
g. Ambulance . Service. A. K. P., Kranee, 
Sqnlrea, Paul K.. Ut Lieut I - 

b. r. i 

Stiles, Allieri R.. Camp Devens. Ayer. 

StowelL Harold. 

Swett, F. »., ex-'H, Lieut. I 1 
\rtuy, (Randolph, Vt.l 

Thayer, William W..Ud Lieut, Co. H, 
auUt Int. Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Tucker, Arthur C, ex "17. Private, 
Till X. Y. Inf., (Mamamiieek, X. Y.) 

Tueker, l^e H.,ex-*l7. Enlisted Re- 
serve Corps, (111 West Maple St., I^afl- 
sing, Mo t. 

Tutbill, Samuel F., .Sergeant llead- 
iioarters Oo.,S^ Inf., Camp DOfWM, 

Ayer 

Ppnon. Everett I.., Sid Lieut., ffihl Inf., 
Camp Fremont, Falo Alt»>. Cal. 

Walbridge, Henry B., Private, Bat- 
tery 0, IMd W. A.. National Army. 
Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Warren, J. J.» Sorgeaai-Major. »ith 
( ., ,7th Bit., 16Ut iMpot Brigade,. (amp 
Devens, Ayer. 

Webster, Frank ft, es-17. Camp Dev- 
ens, Ayer. (Harvard.. 

Westmaa, Robert c., J sin as* Private, 
; tr ,| („. 3rd PlHt.M.n. dnlcers" Training 
f"amp, Taphank, L. I. 

Wheeler. Chester W., W ©«■ 1'"- 
vate, R. R. MachtBlit, t ... F, 14th En- 
giBeers R. V.. A. 1. F. 

Wbitaey, Joiieph K.. P. ft. Marines, 
HWCo.Pih K*gt., care of Postmaster 
New York City. 

WUber, t harle* R-, OfBeers' Train inir 
( -at,! P. Yaphank. L. I, 

William*. Arthur P., 2d Lieut . I 1 
A. t Co. M» Nth InL, Camp tirpese. 
Charlotte. N. ft 

Allen, Leland C, Medical f orps Hos- 
pital, Camp Deven*. Av«. 

Allen. Ralph ¥.., Mos.|ttft« Fleel U.S. 
Navy. 



Babbitt, Prank M., cx-lS. Se.-eant,' Saffron, Paul J. Co. F, 302nd Inf., 
Officers' Trainiii" Camp, Camp Devens. < amp Devens. Ayer. 
Kytn . llarwood, Ralph W., Lieut.. R. W • IL, 

Babbitt, Oeorgs K.,ffaialng Camp, Co. E, lOlad U»f„ 6Tst Brigade, 20th 
Yaphank, L. I. I Dlrtakm, A. i. P. 

Hainl.ridue, Prank H., Aviation See- | Il'mgins. L. C, Section 10, U. S»A, 

tloa, signal Corps P. s, A. Aviation [Ambulance service, A. K. F. via Nov, 
School, Texas. ^ "•'k^ 

Raker, Foster K., Private. 1st Class, 1 , Holmes, Ralph P., Lieut., Co. B, 



Signal Enlisted U. C, Fairhaven, Mass. 
Barbour, f. <'., m-'ih, Medical Dept., 

Co, Q, Port Ethan Allen. Yt, 

Sinks, Frank L, Private, Medical 



108rd liegimeut. 20th Division. A. K. F. 
Howard, Arthur M.. SOlfll Ammuni- 
tion Train. Motor Truck, Co. 3, Camp 
Devens, Aver. 



Dept., 5 K St. N. K , Washington, D. C. 

Rom, W. IL, 1st Lieut.. P. S. li.. Inf.. 
(amp Lee. Petersburg, Va. 

Bradley, W, J., Machine (iun Co., 
SOstfa Begt., Camp Devens. Ayer. 

Hlllleli. Chester 8., ex-'lH. Ciltllp Do\ 
eii>, Ayer. 

Capon, Howard !>., ex-TH. 

Cartel. Thomas E., Training Camp. 
Yaphank , L. I. 

Chambers, Roger J., Aviation School, 
San A utonio, 'Texas. 

Cbefferds, Louis D., cx-lH, Medical 
Supply Depot, Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Clapp, Hogor P., Convoy Autos, S. M. 
U. HI, par H. I . M.. Paris. Frame. 

Davis, Albert S. 

Dowd, William L.,Camp Devoid. Ayer. 

Kdcs. David <>. N,, Training Camp. 
Yaphank, L. 1. 

Kllis, Ralph c . Private, Headquarters 
to. sth Regiment, P. ft, M. C.,care oi 

Post master. New York. 

Panciif. Leo J.. Aviation Corps, San 

Antonio, Texas. 

Farrar. Delwin IL. Ellington Field, 
Texaa. 

Fellow*. Harold ft, litlh Oo., ^ih 
Training Bat L, 167th De|M»t Brigade. 
Camp tiordon, tia. 

Poster, II. K.. l-i Lieut., I I Dm . 
Rati. Adj. a«th Inf., A. E. F. via Sev> 
York. 

Francis, Ikmald s., ami Lieut., G«, K, 
101st Regiment, \ E. F. via New York. 

Frajter, Charles A., Lieut, U.S. l»t 
l«Mth Regiment, «... D, A. K. P.. can al 
V.ljl. (JciM-ral. Washlngloii, D. C, 

Hello k \fthur I... 2nd to. lot \ m 
niunltioii Train, 20th DUUIon, A. E. F, 
via New York. 

Fuller, C, B., 2nd Lieut. Aviation 
section ut Signal Corp.. 

lb ower. Thomas J.,»ergeanl. Offleers 
Training Camp. Yaphank, L I. 

(llfford, Flavel M., l»rivate, g. M. C. 
Caanal Ofc, 4Ut Division, Camp Merritl, 
N .1 

i.illetlee, Nathan W.,Co, S. P <» ' 
Bat., Fort Leavenwort h. Kansas. 

iMHMiridge, (Jeorge F., ind Weal.. 
llilut Itogimerit. 0», <*. A. K. F. via New 
York. 

«,.*Klwln, William L. Training Camp. 
Yaphank, L. I. 

liordon. Frederick U„ f ... D. lOUl 
Inf.. V ^ . \. K. F. 

tiray, Milton B, P. H. H. C. 214, care 
of PostniMUr New York. 

UraywiB, Forresi. 

Hanee, Forrest ft., Snd Lieut., gud 
Regiment. Fltd.l Artillery. 

Hawley, th.iwrt D., Training Camp, 
f^mp Oreenleaf, F».n f iKollharpe, CJs. 



Howe, A. E., Drawer 3t», P. S. N. R. 
F., Now Haven, Conn. 

Hunnewoll. Paul F., 'Training Camp 
Yaphank, L. L 

Huntooo, D. IL. supply Co., HOand 

Inf., Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Kennedy, Call P., Aviation Bel I. 

Koriug, William It., !5th Co., Fort 
Slocutn, N. Y. 

Maginnis John J., 2nd Lieut., 3t)lst 
Inf., Camp Devens, Ayer, 

Marshall, Max S.,2ml l.ieiil., t^. M.C.. 
N. A. A-2, 2d Student Co., Camp Joseph 
K. Johnston. Jacksonville. Fla. 

MeKcelmie. Donald, ex-'lH, Co. B, 
3tllst Kngineors. Camp Devens, Ayer. 

KcNaUght, Warren A., LlsUt. Field 
Artillery, Port Ethan Allen, Yt. 

Mitchell, Edward N., Lieut, xth Inf., 
A. K. P., France, 

Mitchell, Theodore B.. On, I, aoid 
Inf., Camp Devens, Vyer. 

\|..vuihan, P. L. Lieut. 

\, vvioii, Kdward H. 

Soreross, <;. C, Mil co.,«th BaL, 
Depot Brigade, Camp Devens, Ayer, 

(Mams, Lester N., 1st Lieut., to. A, 
303rd Machine (inn BaL, Camp Devena, 
\ | er. 

Neitel, August L. 

Patch, Lawrence IL. P. S. Naval Hue- 
plial. Xew|M»rt, U I. 

letn. Mthur Y., Training Camp, 
Yaphank, L. 1. 

Phipps, Clarence B., Training f 'amp, 
Yaphank, L. I. 

Powell, Jamea C, »nd Lieut., 2«th 
(n., 7t h Bat., Dejsit Brigade, Camp 
Devens. Ayer. 

Preble. John N,, V. H. Ambulanee 
Hervlee, CaettaJ Barraoka, AI!enlown,I*a, 

R aymond , C. R„ Corp li Co. SGth En- 
Bra, \. E. F. via New York. 

Reomana, Hi lore IL, Training 

Damp, Yaphank, L. I. 

Rlrbardwjn. Stephen M., Training 
Camp, Yaphank, L. I. 

Bt»e.piist; Birger 11., Training Camp, 
Yaphank. L. I. 

Sampson, Fred IL. Lieut. 4th Co., 1st 
Bat., Depot Brigade. 7rtth Div Camp 
Devens, Ayer. 

Banboni, Dean W., Private 7th f)o„ 
Ihwtoii c. A, f:., Fort Warwn. 

.Sawyer, William (. . \vlati«n Onmnrf 
Srbool. 

Seavey, Arthur J., ex-TB, Iril class 
pharmacistM mate, Naval School, Ports- 
nioiitii, n. li. 

ftpanldlng, r^wia W„ fcd Ueiit. A. 
K. F., FraBee. 

»tack|».le. Frank C, Flying Cadet, 
Hefstner Fold. I*ke Charles, 1^., H. 

D, ft 
Stone, Raymond t. t Ul class Private 




.VE 



A homelike atoppino* place for i, Aggie" men. 

A new, mndtrn house with every convenience 

AFTER-SUPPER PARTIES, BANQUETS, Sic. 



Mm J. li- W. Davenport, 



Pleasant it* 






I 



} 



l\ 



s 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918. 



Co. A.,:to:inl Machine mm Hat.. 158 Inf. 
Brigade, Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Swift, Hubbard, Corp, II ('<.., 802nd 
Inf., Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Swift, Raymond \V., 104th l\ S. A. 

Inf. Band, 8tb. Begt, 6Sad Brigade, Into 

Div.. A. K. K. via New York. 
Thompson, Wells V. Sergl., 1st Co. 

4th itai., Depot Brigade, Camp Devens, 

Ayer. 

Thorpe, Richard \V.. V . S. N. it., Har- 
vard Radio School, Cambridge. 

Weeks, Kojjer W.. Capt, N. A., Brd Co. 
4th liar., Depot Hrigade. ("amp Devens, 
Ayer. 

Wilbur, Laurence W., ex-' 18, Yeoman 
in I'. S. Navy, K.xeeiuive < (dicer's < >l)i<c. 
Naval Training .Station, Newport, U. I. 

Willoimhhy, Kayinoml I:. Candidate 
Co. 2, Brd Q, T. C, Military Branch, 
Chattanooga. Tenn. 

Woo.iworth, Brooke, Bergt.,Co. a, 

SOSrd Inf., Camp Devens, Ayer. 
Worth ley, Harlan V, 1st Lieut. 

lWl'.l. 

Ban let t., Samuel C, Battery V. :S»li„t 
Bag, Field Aitiiiery a. K. F., Prance. 

Baxter. Herbert H., Third OfUsera' 
Trainiug Camp, Camp Devens, Aver. 

Beadle, Herbert O., Sergeant Mailers 
Eg07 Field Artillery, Camp Di\, N. .1. 

liigelow, tjeorge s., 1114 Engineer* 
See. Dept,, Camp KcClellan, Aunbrfon, 
Oa. 

Blamhard, Htm. K., Flying Cadet 
fchool of Military Aeruuaatioa, < ornell 
I'niversity, Ithaca, N. ^ 

Holand, KelisS,, Hllsl IS. Engineers 
A. E. P., France, 

Boys ton, Raymond w.. Training 

Camp, Vaphank. I.. I. 
Burton, Bee W., Aviation (pawed 

exanij. 

Chapin, K. C. tamp Devens. Ayer, 

I bane, Chester I,.. Private 1st class 

\ vial I. .11 ,S,-e. Signal Unlisted licserre 

• ..rps. 

< lapp. A. Warren, Hrd class radio 
officer, Harvard University, Cambridge, 

i ooley, Edwin 1*., Officer* Training 
Camp, (amp Uptoa, X. Y. 

D.tvie*. James P. i Signal Corp* School 
oi Instruction rntverelty of Vermont. 
Burlington, ft, 

Day. Il.in.i.l K., Training Camp. \ ap- 
hank, B. 1. 

Desmond, Thomas W.. 1st l.icul., 
Plattsburg. 

Field,.). B..KC0. 8IUnd Int. (amp 
Devens, Aver. 

Jay, Ijwrence W., ex.'I9, Headquar- 
ters, to. lOltt Fleid Artillery, A, K, F„ 
France. 

tiillegan, Herald St., Private Q, M. C. 
Casual Co, 41st Div, Camp Merrill, N. .1. 
Overseas, 

Huff, Howard M., Harvard Radio 
School. 

Banter, Training tamp, Yaphmik, 
L. I. 

Kimball. W, T... U. 8. Xaval Academy. 
Annapolis, 

Knight, Frank C. Naval Reserve, 

l*ary. Prank D„ V, S, Naval Hospital 
Corps, Naval Hospital School, Newport, 
R. I. 

ladper, M, ii.. Drafted, 

Mason, John J,, Aviation Corps. 

Manse!!, Elton J„ Training Camp, 
Vaphank. D, I, 

ifcCJellan, Adams X .Training Camp, 

Yaphank, B, I. 

Montgomery, A. B.. (imp Devens, 
\ > er. 

Moore, John R„ 8« Inf. Co, c, Camp 
QoidoB, <■*, 

Morgan, Earle A,, Co, H. W V. 8. 
Iiifantry.Camp f.reone, Charlotte, N. C 

Morse, Lewi* It,, 

Morse, Maurice, Lieut. ( T ,S, A. Port 
Leavenworth. Kan. 

Newljold, Douglas, Training Camp, 
Yaphank. B. I. 



Newton, Edwin B. 

u'Haia, Joseph E., Training Camp, 

Yaphank , B. C 

Peek, Roger K.,87ih Aero .S.| uailrnii , 
Camp Kelley, San Antonio, Tex. 

Peterson, Beroy !>., Navy. 

Pond, Allan B., Corporal Headquar- 
ters Co, 14th Railway Engineer* A. £. 
P. , France. 

Poole, Harold W..A vial ion Corps Gov- 
ernment Aviation School at Cornell. 

Quitsby, Arthur K., Sergeant 801st 
Field Artillery Battery C Officers Train- 
ing Camp. Camp Devens, Ayer. 

Roberta, Mark A,, ted Officers Train- 
ing Camp, Camp Gordon, fja. 

Readio, Roger F., Aviation Corps, 
Princeton, N, J. 

Ki.s.s, Donalil, Aviation Corps Signal 
Corps. 

Howe, Clifford A., Training Camp, 
Yaphank, B. l. 

Sargent, Walter IB. (intends to enter 

Aero i orps). 

*-• lienkelberger. Frederic, Sergeant, 
Sanitary Dept.lG2nd Machine Gun Bate 

A. E. P., France. 

Neavey, Paul S., V. B. Navy. 

Sedgwick, Alfred, Flying Cadet, Avi- 
ation Section, 1st Provisional Squadron, 

Ellington Field, Houston, Texas. 

Sextou, Ernest f , Bieui., SSrd U.S. 

Infantry A. E. P., France. 

Skinuer, Everett II, Training Camp. 
Vaphank, I,. I. 

Efaattb, Jonathan IB, No. 7 Base Hos- 
pital I nit, Boston, 

Spencer, Arthur W., Depot Brigade, 
Camp Devens, A\. i. 

Spronl, Walton B„ ox-TW, I. S. Am- 
bulanee Corps, France, 

Woods, Frank A., Camp Deun-. Ami. 

Wright, Livingston, Private, Ameri- 
can Field Service s, s. C. 80, tw I. 0, s, 
v. a. >.. wiih French Army, Parle, 
Prance. 

1920. 

Bowmar, Ralph B,, Medical Dept. 1st 
i S, Engineers A. E. P, France via 
N. Y. 



Burnett. Paul B., Medical Training 
Corps, Co. I.. Cnit (), Fort Ethan Allen, 
Vt. 

Caode, Robert P., Third Officers Train- 
ing Camp, Camp I'pton, Vaphank, B. 1. 

Chase. Franeis ('., American Saw Mill 
Unit for Eng. No. 1 Bonar Bridge Suther- 
land, Scot. 

Davidson, Donald C, Training Camp, 
Yaphank, B. I, 

Douglass, Donald C, Aviation Corps 
Balloon Sect, Signal Corps. 

Hathaway, Warren Ii., Training Camp, 
Yaphank, B. 1. 

Crawford, Alexander G,, U.S. Base 
Hospital No. 5, care of British General 
Hospital No. 11, France, 

Hathaway, Uichiuoud IB, l\ s. Navy. 

Heruenway, Carl M., Co I 104th Int. 

I*. S. A. E, F., France. 

lorio. Carlo A., Engineering Corps, 
Camp Dew I,... Ayer. 

King, Starr M., Corporal (Acting Ser- 
geant) 32ud Co, 8th Bat. Depot lirigade, 
Camp Devens. 

Bind(|uist, Harry <i.,H»th('o. :>th,Batt. 
Depot Brigade, Ayer. 

Mangiuii, Andrew B., Ex-'SW, Sergeant 
Medical Corps l. S. A. Base Hospital, 
t amp Devens, Ayer. 

M. Donald, Milton C., U.S. A. A. C. 
Sec. 89 Ambulance Unit, A. E. P., Prance. 

Mallou, Charles H., Able Seaman, U. 
S. Navy. 

Munroe, ltaymond P., Headquarters, 
Co. :iU2 Kegt. Inf.. Camp Devens, Ayer, 

Murray, Harry A., Jr., Private Baae 
Hospital Medical Dept., Camp Merrill, 
N. J. 

Phillips, S. A., 2nd Class Pharmacist's 

Mala. 

Richards, George IB, Aviation Corp* 
Balloon Sec. Signal Corps. 

Roberts, Ivaa a., Royal Plying Corps, 

( lamp Borden, Tex. 

Robertson, W. P., Aviation. 

Snow, John D., Balloon See. Signal 
Corps. 

Ware, Mason, Cbarlestowa Navy Yard, 

CbarhMtown, S. C. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Tstsphoas 

Associate Alumni, C. A. Peters, Secretary— 454 W 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, P. A .McLaughlin, Secretary — 432-R 



M, A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athtetic Association, 

"Phe College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Football Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M, A. C. Christian Association, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Inteiclass Athletic Committee, 



C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403-M 

H K. Robbins, Manager — res. 62 W 

H. L. Russell, President— 416 

C. CJ. Mattoon, Manager- 833S-W 

R. H Colitns, Acting Manager— S336 

J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 

S. P. Batcheidar, Manager— 8364 

F. H. Canlett, President— 8338-W 

M» F. Evans, Manager— 8347 

E. M, Buffura, Manager — S33S-VV 

R. I* Boyd, PreatdeoT— 41 6 

H. L. Russell, PresifJcnt — 1 19-R 

JcAn Yesair, Secret! ry— 8346 



Amherst Co-op Laundry 




HiRh-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, - 
Cnffs, 

Plain Wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



• 2! -2c 
Sl-Sc 

per do«. 48c 
per dos. 



Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

steam Pressing 4ic, S suits (or $1.00 
Dry t'leaninR and Pressing, $LM a Salt 



All Mill imynlile St ( «iilrg«- Btoru SB<t r*,rc#li 
l#tl lh#re will r»c#tv« prompt attention. 



G. K. BAiBrrr'i^, Alpha Si na Phi House ; F. E. ColkJr.'zo,! 



Waugh, Frederick V., V. S. A. Ainlui- 
lancc Service, See, 610, s. s. c. ti7 A. E. 

P., France. 

Wright, Kcnnui h Y., 1st Lieut., Carnp 
Devens, Aver. 



CIGARS 
CIGARETTE 

CANDIES 



M. A. C. BANNERS 



— AT— 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 



CARS 



M. A. C. for Hoiyoke ?-« and hourly 
until n-ao p. m. 

M, A. C. for Amherst 6-10, 6-45, 7-fo, 7 50, 
8-0$. 0-so, then 30 min, snd 35 mm. 
after the hour until 10-20 P. M. Other 
can st 1 1-50 A. »,. 350, % §©, 7-50, 9.50, 
10-50 p. St., and a lat>i car at 1 1-20 p. M 

Amherst for M. A C. 6-05. 6-30, then 
half-hourly untrl ^00 A. M,, 8-15, o-i>, 
then 15 min. and 30 min. after the hour 
until 11-30 p. M. Other rarg at 12-00 
noon and 4-00,600,800,1000 p. m. and 
a last car at 12 30 P. M. 

SysctsJ Cars st Reasonable Rates 



AIHERST I SUNDERLAND SI. RY. DO 



jIMl'OklbDHUSILKYi 



I 



Far Golf, 1 tub and Sptrt Wear 

IN \ I l '< \ HI I >l - X . N , K)|< 
■UN A\D V»u»IK,N 




ILMipuli mm <*•«, Io«<*rt mn4 ap e r* iMFfMHI. m 
Stewart Spiting Sales Co. J 
425 MFTH AVF... ..i 3Sth St 9 






FEB 21 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 19, 1918. 



if 

3a 



New York City 



M. A. C. DEFEATS AMHERST 
BASKETBALL TEAM 22-12 

First Basketball Game Between Two 

Colleges. M. A. C. Shows 

Consistent Game. 

M. A. <\ 22, Amlu-rst 12. wan tBi 

reading of t ha scora iiuaniKrUiay nlfthl Ii 

I In- Drill Hall. Tin- gaOM was ih«' liisi 
fv«<r played between the twn Insiiui- 
ttona, aad resulted in a dectaiofl thai 

fm partieulurly yialitjinii la the lnrye 

inriiiu i ..I Aggie Mpporters that ware 
present. This was i he lirsi «f a aeries 
of two game* which Is t<> he played ; the 
return game will l»e played in I'rait 
gymnasium at a future date, aud a line 
euntesl is <\ pcited !<> take plaee when 
the MarcKin and White ei»nihinaii<ni 
tacklm the purple oa it* own Hour. 

The flrnt period was rather loosely 
played, neither qninttt exhibiting a 
gnat deal of team-work. Captain Me- 
Carthy put hi* team lathe lead, after 
the flrat two rnlnutes <d play. I.v oaglag 
a goal from the toul line, followed vet > 
soon by another imtn the fifteen foot 
mark, Kennedy evened up the team* 
by luealng twogoali from foul, aud at 
two all the lives battled for some few 
minutes, after wbleb the Purple wa* 
put In the lead by a pretty baaket from 
the floor, raged by Zlak. McCarthy 
again tossed a free one through tbe 
hoop, followed by two bankets from the 
floor which Parkhnrst suc ceede d In 
ringing just before time was called. 
At the end »f the peri«»d M. A. 0, had 
■cored seven tallies while ber opponent 
had tour to their credit. 

In the second half the Maroon and 
White combination started off with a 
spurt lhat seemed to lift tbe Amherst 
team from Its feel, and before the ■en 
from "the hill" realised what was 
happening Whittle bad tuak twu 
through the eirHe and McCarthy had 
l.tund the hoop for another double 
tally. With thhmlne point lead held 
by the wearers of the Marooa awl 
White Amherst tightened and from tb*s 
time on the two team* fought fairly 
evenly lor the rest of the period , Park- 
hurst again scored from the floor a* did 
Kennedy a few seconds later. In this 
second frame of the game Kennedy 
seemed to be the one man for Amherst 
thai could ooMeet with the basket, al- 
though most of bis lallies were scored 
from the l§-foot mark, he eoorihg tour 
from Ibis distance in as many trie*. 
The U, A. C <l*e excelled In its floor 
work, and as a result scored nine bas- 
kets f rout the floor, while the Ambers* 
quintet could connect with the circle 
only three time*. 

The feature of the game was the con- 
sistent work of ihe Aggie team, with 
Whittle standing out as the most con- 
spicuous, when It cauie to acotlBg, 
being aided greatlug In this respect by 
the floe floor work of McCarthy, The 



AGGIE TEAMS WIN FOUR VICTOR IES IN TWO DAYS 

Harvard, Dartmouth, Amherst, and Worcester Polytech fell before 
the athletic prowess of M. A. C. teams during the past week end. 

Friday night, in tbe Drill Hall, the basketball five sent Amherst 
down to defeat by a score of 22-12. The next evening the basketball 
team showed the way for the Worcester aggregation, 34-20. 

At Hanover, Saturday, the hockey team took Dartmouth into camp 
to tbe tune of 5 goals to 2; and the R. 0. T. C. relay team journeyed 
to the Army and Navy meet at Boston and distanced the Harvard 
runners by a good 25 yards. 



HARVARD R. 0. T. C. LOSES 
TO M. A. C. RELAY TEAM 



PROF. HUMPHREY OF TRINITY 
TO TALK ON THE BALKANS 



Aggies Take Race by Twenty-yard 

Lead. Two Races to Be Run 

With Amherst. 

Due to the failure of I he M. 1. T. K. 
<». T, <', relay team to put In an appear- 
:l me at I lie Ninth Iteyimeni Armory in 
Boetea Saturday algbl i he M. \. C. K. 
() I. C. team ran against the Harvard 
soldier*, The raee was close during the 
first two relays after which the Maroon 
and While added to the lead created by 
Dewing, aaeh man adding several yards 
so that I hey llnlsto-d ahead of the Har* 
t artl men with ttft yards to spare. 

I lie lir»t men were Chapman and 
Paige, the latter holding the pole p»«i 
I Ion andlinlshlng his two lap* twoyanb 
ahead of Chapman. I tewing passed 
Douglas on the second hank and opened 
up a five yard lead which Newell in- 
creased to ten over Churchill, Vessair 
had no difficulty hi adding fifteen yards 
(o I he lead he received tr.im S'ewell and 
broke the tape tweoly-flve yards la ad* 
vanee of Baldwin, 

M. A. c. was well represe nted in the 
mo yard run. Carpenter and « arlelon 
both making pretty ights for p«»itfon«, 
the former finishing fourth, while Carle- 
teuauceeedml in land.nu M\th place. 

Two races have been arranged for the 
varsity relay tea™ with the .piattei 
representing Amherst. Tbe first «f the 
raees is to be run Baturtay, Feb. m, 
while the second race will eoree a week 
Inter, It is piauued to have one n^ on 
each »d the college i rack*, but final ar- 
raBgenieBis have not yet been made 
with regard to this ■alter, 

1920 WINS RELAY 

The .Hoph-oiiore-Krethmaa relay raee 
Monday afteraooi resulted In a pretty 
battle, the 1WHI men Jinally wlnntug In 
i min, 17 *ec, Ca«cio and Newell got 
away together and until tale In the sen- 
„nd lap raced abreast when Cas«o 
handed a lead of one yard to Alger who 
beti, ted hi« man by another ihree feet, 
carMon gained on Pratt and «uoeeede4 
in wresting a «ta yard lead from tbe 
Vresbnian, Ifeie being increased to lea 
yawls by Gray, 



Flrat of Series of Talks oa European 

Countries and Their Influence 

in the War. 

Professor Humphry of Trinity College 
Is la he the speaker for the llrst assem- 
bly of the third lerui. He Is to take 
for bin Milijeii "The HalkauM ami their 
part in the World War." This Is to be 
part of a plan to ronaider wimi of ibe 
Kuropean countries and their intluenee 
In the war, which will be taken up at 
suhsfHiueni aaaeiuhlicn. I'mt HumphiN 
has traveled ekteiiHividy in all of t